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Full-Text Articles in Law

Flaws In The Justice System: Examining The Angel Cordero Case, Rose C. Itzcovitz Dec 2015

Flaws In The Justice System: Examining The Angel Cordero Case, Rose C. Itzcovitz

Capstones

This article examines a case in criminal law that started 17 years ago and has yet to be resolved. Despite a plethora of mounting evidence, including a confession, more than a dozen witnesses, a proven false alibi, impeaching evidence against police and DNA evidence, Bronx-born Angel Cordero's conviction has yet to be overturned. The article breaks down what went wrong in the initial trial, discusses Cordero's multiple appeals and takes a broader look at what needs to change in today's judicial system.


Police Misconduct As A Cause Of Wrongful Convictions, Russell Covey Nov 2015

Police Misconduct As A Cause Of Wrongful Convictions, Russell Covey

Russell D. Covey

This study gathers data from two mass exonerations resulting from major police scandals, one involving the Rampart division of the L.A.P.D., and the other occurring in Tulia, Texas. To date, these cases have received little systematic attention by wrongful convictions scholars. Study of these cases, however, reveals important differences among subgroups of wrongful convictions. Whereas eyewitness misidentification, faulty forensic evidence, jailhouse informants, and false confessions have been identified as the main contributing factors leading to many wrongful convictions, the Rampart and Tulia exonerees were wrongfully convicted almost exclusively as a result of police perjury. In addition, unlike other exonerated persons, …


Wrongful Convictions And Upstream Reform In The Criminal Justice System, Kate Kruse Jan 2015

Wrongful Convictions And Upstream Reform In The Criminal Justice System, Kate Kruse

Faculty Scholarship

This Article explores the viability of upstream criminal justice reforms within the context of an adversary and procedural system of criminal justice, focusing on reforms in eyewitness identification procedures. Mistaken eyewitness identification evidence is often cited as the leading cause of wrongful convictions in the United States. Eyewitness identification reforms have also been the most developed upstream efforts to grow out of the innocence movement. The success and limitation of upstream reform in eyewitness identification shed light on the efficacy of upstream criminal justice system reform more generally, as well as in areas that are less developed, such as the …


The Michael Morton Act: Minimizing Prosecutorial Misconduct., Cynthia E. Hujar Orr, Robert G. Rodery Jan 2015

The Michael Morton Act: Minimizing Prosecutorial Misconduct., Cynthia E. Hujar Orr, Robert G. Rodery

St. Mary's Law Journal

Twenty-five years ago, Texas prosecutors significantly limited the pre-trial discovery it disclosed to criminal defendants. As a result of this policy, innocent individuals accused of murder, like Michael Morton, were denied their right to due process. Michael Morton was incarcerated for twenty-five years following a wrongful murder conviction. He was denied access to crucial evidence, which included a bandana with the victim’s blood and the killer’s hair, and eyewitness accounts describing the killer at or near the time of the murder. The prosecutor purposely withheld this evidence from Michael Morton; but thanks to the efforts of the Innocence Project, he …


After The Hurricane: The Legacy Of The Rubin Carter Case, Judith Ritter Dec 2014

After The Hurricane: The Legacy Of The Rubin Carter Case, Judith Ritter

Judith L Ritter

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter died in the spring of 2014 at the age of seventy-six. He was a top middleweight boxing contender in the early 1960s, twice convicted of a triple homicide, but then freed by a federal court in 1985 after he served nineteen years in prison. This article recalls his life, the homicide trials and the constitutional issues that led to his release. The article makes the point that had Rubin Carter’s federal habeas corpus petition been adjudicated under current law, he would have remained behind bars. Congress enacted the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act in 1996. The …