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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Law

Watershed Based Policy Tools For Reducing Nutrient Flows To Surface Waters: Addressing Nutrient Enrichment And Harmful Algal Blooms In The United States, John A. Hoornbeek, Joshua Filla, Soumya Yalamanchili Dec 2017

Watershed Based Policy Tools For Reducing Nutrient Flows To Surface Waters: Addressing Nutrient Enrichment And Harmful Algal Blooms In The United States, John A. Hoornbeek, Joshua Filla, Soumya Yalamanchili

Fordham Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


Legal Analysis Of Barriers To Adaption For California’S Water Sector, Michael Hanemann, Deborah Lambe, Daniel Farber Nov 2017

Legal Analysis Of Barriers To Adaption For California’S Water Sector, Michael Hanemann, Deborah Lambe, Daniel Farber

Daniel A Farber

No abstract provided.


Energy-Water Nexus, The Clean Power Plan, And Integration Of Water Resource Concerns Into Energy Decision-Making, Sarah Ladin Nov 2017

Energy-Water Nexus, The Clean Power Plan, And Integration Of Water Resource Concerns Into Energy Decision-Making, Sarah Ladin

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

Energy regulation in the United States is now at a crossroads. The EPA has begun the process to officially repeal the Clean Power Plan and currently has no plan to replace it with new rulemaking to regulate carbon emissions from the U.S. energy sector. Even though the Clean Power Plan is more or less at its end, its regulatory structure stands as a model of the way decision-makers in the United States regulate the energy sector and the environment. Since the beginning of the modern environmental legal system, decision-makers have chosen to silo the system. Statutes and agencies focus on …


Designing Effective Groundwater Sustainability Agencies: Criteria For Evaluation Of Local Governance Options, Michael Kiparsky, Dave Owen, Nell Green Nylen, Holly Doremus, Juliet Christian-Smith, Barbara Cosens, Andrew Fisher, Anita Milman Oct 2017

Designing Effective Groundwater Sustainability Agencies: Criteria For Evaluation Of Local Governance Options, Michael Kiparsky, Dave Owen, Nell Green Nylen, Holly Doremus, Juliet Christian-Smith, Barbara Cosens, Andrew Fisher, Anita Milman

Holly Doremus

No abstract provided.


Citizen Enforcement And Sanitary Sewer Overflows In California, Nell Green Nylen, Luke Sherman, Michael Kiparsky, Holly Doremus Oct 2017

Citizen Enforcement And Sanitary Sewer Overflows In California, Nell Green Nylen, Luke Sherman, Michael Kiparsky, Holly Doremus

Holly Doremus

No abstract provided.


Whatcom County V. Hirst, Et Al, Stephanie A. George Sep 2017

Whatcom County V. Hirst, Et Al, Stephanie A. George

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Upending decades of common practice in water management and building in the state of Washington, the Washington Supreme Court found Whatcom County violated the state’s Growth Management Act. Whatcom County used the Department of Ecology’s Nooksack Rule in evaluating permits for buildings and subdivisions that rely on permit-exempt wells. This decision affects families across the state of Washington.


Agriculture, Water Pollution, And The Future Of Epa’S Regulatory Authority In A Post-American Farm Bureau Federation V. U.S. Epa America, Henry Brudney Aug 2017

Agriculture, Water Pollution, And The Future Of Epa’S Regulatory Authority In A Post-American Farm Bureau Federation V. U.S. Epa America, Henry Brudney

Seattle Journal of Environmental Law

Until the recent decision of American Farm Bureau Federation v. U.S. EPA, the EPA’s total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulation under the Clean Water Act contained no substantive standard for water quality. However, in this decision, the Third Circuit added such substantive criteria to the TMDL, which should have a monumental effect on the improvement of water quality standards in the United States.


United States V. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., Jonah P. Brown Apr 2017

United States V. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., Jonah P. Brown

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Application of water to a beneficial use is the decisive element of a perfected water right in Montana. The BLM claimed rights to five reservoirs and one natural pothole under Montana law. The agency did not own livestock, but instead made the water available to grazing permittees. In United States v. Barthelmess Ranch Corp., the Montana Supreme Court affirmed the Montana Water Court’s holding that the BLM’s practice of making water available to others constituted a beneficial use and a perfected water right.


Law Library Blog (March 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Mar 2017

Law Library Blog (March 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Standing Rock Sioux Tribe V. U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers, Jody D. Lowenstein Feb 2017

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe V. U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers, Jody D. Lowenstein

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Standing Rock Sioux’s effort to enjoin the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ permitting of an oil pipeline was stifled by the United States District Court of the District of Columbia. In denying the preliminary injunction, the court held that the Tribe failed to show that the Corps violated the National Historic Preservation Act, and that the Tribe’s belated effort to litigate was futile after failing to participate in the consultation process.


The Clark Fork Coalition V. Tubbs, Jonah P. Brown Feb 2017

The Clark Fork Coalition V. Tubbs, Jonah P. Brown

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Before landowners may appropriate groundwater in Montana, they must first apply for a DNRC permit pursuant to the Montana Water Use Act. Landowners may qualify for an exemption from the arduous permitting process if their appropriation meets certain criteria. However, the Act provides an exception to the exemption when a “combined appropriation” from the same source is in excess of ten acre-feet per year. The Clark Fork Coalition v. Tubbs affirmed the district court’s invalidation of the DNRC rule defining “combined appropriation” to only include physically connected groundwater wells.


Water Valuation And Utility Rates, Amy Hardberger Jan 2017

Water Valuation And Utility Rates, Amy Hardberger

Texas A&M Journal of Property Law

As I’ve worked on this topic, it really has evolved. I was thrown into land use, but land use opened my eyes to new water tools. Nationwide there is a shift towards conservation of water and water sustainability. Land use might be the “ace-in-the-hole,” not the simple act of turning the water off when you brush your teeth—even though I want you to do that.

What’s important when talking about how we are going to survive, is “where are we going?” Because cities are so overpopulated, we are moving out of rural areas and into cities. This has caught the …


Incomplete Integration: Water, Drought, And Electricity Planning In The West, Lincoln L. Davies, Victoria Luman Jan 2017

Incomplete Integration: Water, Drought, And Electricity Planning In The West, Lincoln L. Davies, Victoria Luman

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

The water-energy nexus is increasingly important as climate change alters social, policy, and economic tradeoffs and choices. This is particularly true in the arid western United States. This article provides an original empirical assessment of 33 integrated resource plans (IRPs) of electric utilities in that region. The analysis shows that only a minority of utilities address the risk of drought in their IRPs. Even fewer use their IRPs to develop concrete plans to address drought risk. Consequently, we suggest four different strategies for utilities to better integrate water and electricity planning. Importantly, our analysis reveals that legal and policy changes …


Owning Groundwater: The Example Of Mississippi V. Tennessee, Christine A. Klein Jan 2017

Owning Groundwater: The Example Of Mississippi V. Tennessee, Christine A. Klein

UF Law Faculty Publications

In Mississippi v. Tennessee, a case currently on the U.S. Supreme Court’s docket, Mississippi claims that it owns all groundwater stored underneath its borders that does not cross into Tennessee under “natural predevelopment” conditions—before the advent of modern well technology. Mississippi seeks more than six hundred million dollars for pumping by Tennessee wells that tap into a geologic formation that underlies both states. This is a remarkable claim that departs from the almost uniformly established proposition that the states do not “own” the water within their borders, but instead are authorized to manage that water for the “use” of …