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Twentieth-Century Virginia Legal Periodicals: A Bibliography And Commentary, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1994

Twentieth-Century Virginia Legal Periodicals: A Bibliography And Commentary, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

Periodicals have played an important role in the Virginia legal community, serving as a medium for scholarly legal commentary and debate, for keeping practitioners abreast of developments in the law, and for providing information on current events and activities in the legal community. Although the fundamental purposes of the legal periodical have remained somewhat constant, the number and circulation of Virginia legal periodicals have expanded greatly and, as a result, so has their role in the Virginia legal community. A chronological examination of legal periodicals in twentieth-century Virginia reveals that the role of the legal periodical has significantly increased from …


The Virginia Bar, 1870-1900, William Hamilton Bryson Jan 1984

The Virginia Bar, 1870-1900, William Hamilton Bryson

Law Faculty Publications

An essay on the Virginia bar from 1870 to 1900 rnust begin with a definition of a Virginia attorney-at-law. In 1870 and for the next twenty-five years, a Virginia lawyer was "any person" over the age of twenty-one of "honest demeanor" who had been examined for fitness and licensed to practice law by any two judges of Virginia courts of record. Having been licensed, each attorney must have then "qualified" to practice in each court in which he wished to appear. This was done by swearing in that court to demean himself honestly in the practice of law and to …


William Taylor Muse- "The Dean", John W. Edmonds Iii Jan 1972

William Taylor Muse- "The Dean", John W. Edmonds Iii

University of Richmond Law Review

It is hard to discuss William Taylor Muse, or The Dean as he was known to most of us, without using superlatives in what would appear to the uninitiated a super abundance. William T. Muse was many things-a devoted husband and father, an ardent Baptist, an enthusiastic and constant fan of athletics at the University of Richmond, a recognized scholar and legal author, a teacher of law for forty years, secre- tary and president of the Virginia State Bar Association, and a Sunday School teacher for most of his adult life. To most of us, he was pri- marily two …