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Full-Text Articles in Law

A 6-3 Supreme Court Could Allow The Government To Openly Discriminate In Its Policies, Katherine A. Shaw, Leah Litman Oct 2020

A 6-3 Supreme Court Could Allow The Government To Openly Discriminate In Its Policies, Katherine A. Shaw, Leah Litman

Faculty Online Publications

Over the past few days, the Supreme Court has agreed to hear challenges to hot-button Trump administration policies involving the border wall, an attempt to exclude noncitizens from the census breakdown used for allocating seats in Congress and limits on who can apply for asylum from Mexico.


Back To The Future: Creating A Bipartisan Environmental Movement For The 21st Century, David M. Uhlmann Oct 2020

Back To The Future: Creating A Bipartisan Environmental Movement For The 21st Century, David M. Uhlmann

Articles

With a contentious presidential election looming amidst a pandemic, economic worries, and historic protests against systemic racism, climate action may seem less pressing than other challenges. Nothing could be further from the truth. To prevent greater public health threats and economic dislocation from climate disruption, which will disproportionately harm Black Americans, people of color, and indigenous people, this Comment argues that we need to restore the bipartisanship that fueled the environmental movement and that the fate of the planet—and our children and grandchildren—depends upon our collective action.


The Science Of Administrative Change, Barry Sullivan, Christine Chabot Jan 2020

The Science Of Administrative Change, Barry Sullivan, Christine Chabot

Faculty Publications & Other Works

Donald Trump repeatedly vowed to reduce regulation during the 2016 presidential campaign. Indeed, one of his key advisors promised to "deconstruct" the administrative state. Since taking office, President Trump has attempted to make good on his promises, spurring federal agencies to brush aside countless regulations that previous administrations had promulgated based on scientific, technological, or economic evidence. Those efforts, which have been dubbed a "war on science," implicate a long-contested question in administrative law: to what extent should a change in presidential administrations excuse agencies from an obligation to justify changes in policy with expert, reasoned analysis of relevant data? …


The Science Of Administrative Change, Christine Chabot, Barry Sullivan Jan 2020

The Science Of Administrative Change, Christine Chabot, Barry Sullivan

Faculty Publications & Other Works

Donald Trump repeatedly vowed to reduce regulation during the 2016 presidential campaign. Indeed, one of his key advisors promised to "deconstruct" the administrative state. Since taking office, President Trump has attempted to make good on his promises, spurring federal agencies to brush aside countless regulations that previous administrations had promulgated based on scientific, technological, or economic evidence. Those efforts, which have been dubbed a "war on science," implicate a long-contested question in administrative law: to what extent should a change in presidential administrations excuse agencies from an obligation to justify changes in policy with expert, reasoned analysis of relevant data? …


Lessons From The Coronavirus Pandemic For Environmental Governance, Erin Ryan Jan 2020

Lessons From The Coronavirus Pandemic For Environmental Governance, Erin Ryan

Scholarly Publications

This very short essay distills lessons from the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic for leaders everywhere about how—and how not—to manage complex interjurisdictional challenges, like the environment, which unfold without regard for political boundaries. In a matter of months, COVID-19 has laid bare the interdependence of the world on every front imaginable: global public health, economic growth and development, social and professional networks, transportation and migration, and of course, ecological and environmental systems. No single nation has the coronavirus. No one state is economically disrupted. There is no single ethnic group, occupation, or corner of the world that has …


‘Warming Up’ To Sustainable Procurement, Steven L. Schooner, Markus Speidel Jan 2020

‘Warming Up’ To Sustainable Procurement, Steven L. Schooner, Markus Speidel

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Procurement professionals will play a critical role in the belated but necessary effort to slow the pace of climate change. That critical, evolved role will lie in sustainable procurement, which, if effectively implemented, will dramatically alter markets and fundamentally change purchasing behaviors. To be effective, procurement professionals will need to rethink how we define our profession, assess our outcomes, and bring value to our government customers. Successfully establishing a sustainable procurement regime will require dramatic change, including, among other things, overcoming the persistent tyranny of low price, understanding and adopting lifecycle costing, considering externalities in the value proposition, and, of …


New Environmental Crimes Project Data Shows That Pollution Prosecutions Plummeted During The First Two Years Of The Trump Administration, David M. Uhlmann Jan 2020

New Environmental Crimes Project Data Shows That Pollution Prosecutions Plummeted During The First Two Years Of The Trump Administration, David M. Uhlmann

Other Publications

The latest data from the Environmental Crimes Project at the University of Michigan Law School shows a dramatic drop in pollution prosecutions during the first two years under President Donald J. Trump. The data, which now includes 14 years of cases from 2005–2018, shows a 70 percent decrease in Clean Water Act prosecutions under President Trump, as well as a more than 50 percent decrease in Clean Air Act prosecutions. The data again shows that most defendants charged with pollution crime commit misconduct involving one or more of the aggravating factors identified in my previous scholarship, so prosecutors continue to …


Emerging Policy And Practice Issues (2019), Steven L. Schooner Jan 2020

Emerging Policy And Practice Issues (2019), Steven L. Schooner

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

This paper/chapter, presented at the Thomson Reuters Government Contracts Year in Review Conference (covering 2019), attempts to identify the key evolving trends and issues in U.S. federal procurement for 2019-2020 and beyond. Consistent with prior practice, this chapter offers extensive coverage of the federal procurement and defense spending trends and attempts to predict what lies ahead, particularly with regard to legislative and executive activity. This year's paper discusses, among other things, the high degree of uncertainty currently being experienced in the public procurement sphere, dramatic increases to the micro-purchase and simplified acquisition thresholds, the work of the Congressionally-mandated Section 809 …


Why Should We Care About International Law?, Monica Hakimi Jan 2020

Why Should We Care About International Law?, Monica Hakimi

Faculty Scholarship

International lawyers are used to having their discipline dismissed. A conspicuous strand of thought in U.S. foreign policy circles — known as realist — posits that international law does not matter. Realists of course recognize that states and other global actors speak the language of international law. But they view this discourse as cheap talk or epiphenomenal. They contend that state decisions on the international plane are animated not by the dictates of international law but by material interests and power. States act consistently with international law insofar as they have independent reasons for acting that way. If those reasons …