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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Age Of Impunity: Using The Duty To Extradite Or Prosecute And Universal Jurisdiction To End Impunity For Acts Of Terrorism Once And For All, Sarah Mazzochi Nov 2011

The Age Of Impunity: Using The Duty To Extradite Or Prosecute And Universal Jurisdiction To End Impunity For Acts Of Terrorism Once And For All, Sarah Mazzochi

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Impunity remains one of the greatest challenges facing international peace and security today. This article seeks to lay out possible changes to current international law that are necessary to combat impunity, particularly regarding the international crime of terrorism. Part II will lay out what terrorism is and the obstacles the international community faces in achieving a singular definition for the word. Part II will also discuss the different approaches various conventions have taken in defining terrorism and will propose a concise definition the international community may want to adopt. Part II will end with calling for terrorism to be included …


Keynote Address To The 20th Annual Fulbright Symposium – International Law In A Time Of Change, Michael Alsuel Ntumy Sep 2011

Keynote Address To The 20th Annual Fulbright Symposium – International Law In A Time Of Change, Michael Alsuel Ntumy

Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law

The theme of this symposium is International Law in a Time of Change. Considering the events that have engulfed international law in recent times, it is hard to imagine a more important or timely topic than this one. Whether one focuses on the rules, principles and concepts, or the institutions of international law, there is no escape from the fact that these things all bear the indelible imprint of change. This fitting theme has undoubtedly been influenced, I believe, by the "Change" campaign of President Barrack Obama, the “new Prince of Change.” For this reason, I am inclined to …


Xviii Concluding Remarks: Loac And Attempts To Abuse Or Subvert It, Yoram Dinstein Aug 2011

Xviii Concluding Remarks: Loac And Attempts To Abuse Or Subvert It, Yoram Dinstein

International Law Studies

No abstract provided.


Standing Our Ground: A Study Of Southeast Asian Counterterrorism Conventions Contributing To A Peaceful Existence, Major Dennis Hager Jul 2011

Standing Our Ground: A Study Of Southeast Asian Counterterrorism Conventions Contributing To A Peaceful Existence, Major Dennis Hager

University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review

Less than a year after the September 11th attacks on New York and Washington D.C., terrorist groups in Southeast Asia carried out a number of high profile attacks in the region. In an area ripe for global terrorism the effects of counter‐terrorism conventions can be measured and the possibility of progress in the global war observed. The regional cooperation inherent in these conventions has been crucial to the success of peace for this region, and is especially significant considering the immense cultural and political differences among these nations.

With fourteen official languages and over 500 million people living in an …


The Material Support Prosecution And Foreign Policy, Wadie E. Said Apr 2011

The Material Support Prosecution And Foreign Policy, Wadie E. Said

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Guantanamo And Beyond: Reflections On The Past, Present, And Future Of Preventive Detention, Kristine A. Huskey Mar 2011

Guantanamo And Beyond: Reflections On The Past, Present, And Future Of Preventive Detention, Kristine A. Huskey

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “January 11, 2011 began the tenth year of existence of the detention center at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (“Guantanamo” or “GTMO”). In human-being terms, what this means is that large numbers of men have been detained by the U.S. military for almost a decade, in prison-like conditions, without trial. In a pre-9/11 world, a “Guantanamo” and the idea of “detention without trial” would have been seen as decidedly un-American and a violation of our democratic values. Over the last decade, however, Guantanamo” and the practice of long-term detention without trial for terrorism suspects (or, “preventive …


Procedural Justice Post-9/11: The Effects Of Procedurally Unfair Treatment Of Detainees On Perceptions Of Global Legitimacy, David Welsh Mar 2011

Procedural Justice Post-9/11: The Effects Of Procedurally Unfair Treatment Of Detainees On Perceptions Of Global Legitimacy, David Welsh

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] “The Global War on Terror has been ideologically framed as a struggle between the principles of freedom and democracy on the one hand and tyranny and extremism on the other. Although this war has arguably led to a short-term disruption of terrorist threats such as al-Qaeda, it has also damaged America’s image both at home and abroad. Throughout the world, there is a growing consensus that America has “a lack of credibility as a fair and just world leader.” The perceived legitimacy of the United States in the War on Terror is critical because terrorism is not a conventional …


On The Contemporary Meaning Of Korematsu: Liberty Lies In The Hearts Of Men And Women, David A. Harris Jan 2011

On The Contemporary Meaning Of Korematsu: Liberty Lies In The Hearts Of Men And Women, David A. Harris

Missouri Law Review

In just a few years, seven decades will have passed since the United States Supreme Court's decision in Korematsu v. United States, one of the most reviled of all of the Court's cases. However, similarities between the World War II era and our own have instigated a re-evaluation of Korematsu. When the Court decided Korenatsu in 1944, the United States was at war with the Japanese empire, which created considerable suspicion of anyone who shared the ethnicity of these foreign enemies. Since September 11, 2001, America has faced another external threat - from the al Qaeda terrorists - and there …


International Law In Crisis: Challenges Posed By The New Terrorism And The Changing Nature Of War, John F. Murphy Jan 2011

International Law In Crisis: Challenges Posed By The New Terrorism And The Changing Nature Of War, John F. Murphy

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


The Surprising Lessons From Plea Bargaining In The Shadow Of Terror, Lucien E. Dervan Jan 2011

The Surprising Lessons From Plea Bargaining In The Shadow Of Terror, Lucien E. Dervan

Georgia State University Law Review

Since September 11, 2001, several hundred individuals have been convicted of terrorism related charges. Of these convictions, over 80% resulted from a plea of guilty. It is surprising and counterintuitive that such a large percentage of these cases are resolved in this manner, yet, even when prosecuting suspected terrorists caught attempting suicide attacks, the power of the plea bargaining machine exerts a striking influence. As a result, a close examination of these extraordinary cases offers important insights into the forces that drive the plea bargaining system. Utilizing these insights, this article critiques two divergent and dominant theories of plea bargaining …


Terrorism And Universal Jurisdiction: Opening A Pandora's Box?, Luz E. Nagle Jan 2011

Terrorism And Universal Jurisdiction: Opening A Pandora's Box?, Luz E. Nagle

Georgia State University Law Review

The relationship between terrorism and international criminal law has provoked a good deal of discussion in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 in New York City and at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. A particularly challenging issue pertains to whether terrorism is an international crime or a transnational crime, and if and in what context offenders and offenses, to which we affix the label of terrorist and terrorism, should or can be subject to the limited jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and other international and national criminal tribunals.


After Osama Bin Laden: Assassination, Terrorism, War, And International Law, Louis Rene Beres Jan 2011

After Osama Bin Laden: Assassination, Terrorism, War, And International Law, Louis Rene Beres

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


An Unintended Casualty Of The War On Terror, Aya Gruber Jan 2011

An Unintended Casualty Of The War On Terror, Aya Gruber

Georgia State University Law Review

As the dust of the Bush administration’s war on terror settles, casualties are starting to appear on the legal battlefield. The United States’ human rights reputation and the Supreme Court’s international influence lay wounded in the wake of U.S. policies that flouted international law by advocating torture, suborning indefinite detention, and erecting irregular tribunals. Through declining citation, the courts of the world are telling the Supreme Court that if it does not respect international and foreign law, international and foreign courts will not respect it. Some might object that the Supreme Court should not be lumped with the Bush administration …