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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Constitutional Infirmity Of Warrantless Nsa Surveillance: The Abuse Of Presidential Power And The Injury To The Fourth Amendment, Robert M. Bloom, William J. Dunn Oct 2011

The Constitutional Infirmity Of Warrantless Nsa Surveillance: The Abuse Of Presidential Power And The Injury To The Fourth Amendment, Robert M. Bloom, William J. Dunn

Robert M. Bloom

In recent months, there have been many revelations about the tactics used by the Bush Administration to prosecute their war on terrorism. These stories involve the exploitation of technologies that allow the government, with the cooperation of phone companies and financial institutions, to access phone and financial records. This paper focuses on the revelation and widespread criticism of the Bush Administration’s operation of a warrantless electronic surveillance program to monitor international phone calls and emails that originate or terminate with a United States party. The powerful and secret National Security Agency heads the program and leverages its significant intelligence collection …


A Missed Chance For Justice In Court, Tamar R. Birckhead May 2011

A Missed Chance For Justice In Court, Tamar R. Birckhead

Tamar R Birckhead

This op-ed argues that Osama bin Laden should have been captured and tried in a court of law, rather than assassinated under circumstances suggesting he was unarmed and posed no immediate threat.


Book Review Of Counter-Terrorism: The Culture Of Law And Justice After 9/11, Matthew S. R. Palmer Jan 2011

Book Review Of Counter-Terrorism: The Culture Of Law And Justice After 9/11, Matthew S. R. Palmer

The Hon Justice Matthew Palmer

This is a largely complimentary book review focussing on the theme of law and culture in the context of counter-terrorism law.


The Surprising Lessons From Plea Bargaining In The Shadow Of Terror, Lucian Dervan Dec 2010

The Surprising Lessons From Plea Bargaining In The Shadow Of Terror, Lucian Dervan

Lucian E Dervan

Since September 11, 2001, several hundred individuals have been convicted of terrorism related charges. Of these convictions, over 80% resulted from a plea of guilty. It is surprising and counterintuitive that such a large percentage of these cases are resolved in this manner, yet, even when prosecuting suspected terrorists caught attempting suicide attacks, the power of the plea bargaining machine exerts a striking influence. As a result, a close examination of these extraordinary cases offers important insights into the forces that drive the plea bargaining system. Utilizing these insights, this article critiques two divergent and dominant theories of plea bargaining …