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State succession

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Succession By Estoppel: Hong Kong's Succession To The Iccpr, Peter K. Yu Jul 2015

Succession By Estoppel: Hong Kong's Succession To The Iccpr, Peter K. Yu

Peter K. Yu

No abstract provided.


Challenges To The Territorial Integrity Of Guyana: A Legal Analysis, Thomas W. Donovan Sep 2014

Challenges To The Territorial Integrity Of Guyana: A Legal Analysis, Thomas W. Donovan

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


State Succession To Territorial Obligations: The Case Of South Sudan And The 1959 Nile Waters Agreement, Mohamed S. Helal Dec 2012

State Succession To Territorial Obligations: The Case Of South Sudan And The 1959 Nile Waters Agreement, Mohamed S. Helal

Mohamed S. Helal

South Sudan’s independence has increased the number of Nile riparian States to eleven. Unfortunately, the Nile remains without an all-inclusive legal regime to regulate its use and to ensure that this indispensible natural resource is conserved for future generations. What, therefore, are the legal obligations of the newborn Republic of South Sudan regarding the Nile River? Specifically, this paper asks whether the Egyptian-Sudanese Nile Waters Agreement of 1959 has devolved onto South Sudan. This paper looks to the law of State succession to treaties to answer to this question. This is a field of international law that is beset with …


Succession By Estoppel: Hong Kong's Succession To The Iccpr, Peter K. Yu Oct 2012

Succession By Estoppel: Hong Kong's Succession To The Iccpr, Peter K. Yu

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Unjustifiable Expectations: Laying To Rest The Ghosts Of Allotment-Era Settlers, Ann E. Tweedy Feb 2012

Unjustifiable Expectations: Laying To Rest The Ghosts Of Allotment-Era Settlers, Ann E. Tweedy

Ann E. Tweedy

When the Supreme Court decides whether a tribe has jurisdiction over non-members on its reservation or addresses the related issue of reservation diminishment, it often refers implicitly or explicitly to the non-Indians’ justifiable expectations. The non-Indians’ assumed expectations arise from the fact that, when Congress opened up reservations to non-Indians during the allotment era, its assumption, and presumably that of non-Indians who purchased lands on reservations during that period, was that the reservations would disappear due to the federal government’s assimilationist policies, along with the tribes who governed them. To refute the idea that such non-Indian expectations were justifiable, I …


Succession, The Obligation To Repair And Human Rights; The European Court Of Human Rights Judgment In The Case Of Bijelic V. Montenegro And Serbia, Benjamin E. Brockman-Hawe Jan 2010

Succession, The Obligation To Repair And Human Rights; The European Court Of Human Rights Judgment In The Case Of Bijelic V. Montenegro And Serbia, Benjamin E. Brockman-Hawe

Benjamin E. Brockman-Hawe

What happens when a state breaches its international obligations and then ceases to exist? Does its obligation to repair the harm caused by the breach devolve to a new state that occupies part of the territory of an old state? Can a new state be held accountable for violations that took place before the entry into force of the treaty with respect that state? This comment examines the European Court of Human Rights’ (hereinafter 'the Court' or 'the ECHR') encounter with the law of state succession, specifically succession to treaty obligations and succession to responsibility for wrongful acts of a …


The Kosovar Declaration Of Independence: "Botching The Balkans" Or Respecting International Law?, Milena Sterio Jan 2009

The Kosovar Declaration Of Independence: "Botching The Balkans" Or Respecting International Law?, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article will examine in Part II the historic and political relationship between Kosovo and Serbia. This Article will, in Part III, focus on the international legal issues at stake, including state secession, statehood, and state recognition. Part IV will then apply the theories of secession, statehood, and state recognition to the Kosovar situation. Part V will discuss, and debunk, the relevant legal theories purporting to justify the Kosovar independence. Part V will also discuss some important political and legal issues that plague Kosovo in its near future as a new state. Finally, Part VI will conclude that other solutions …


The Odious Debt Doctrine After Iraq, Jai Damle Oct 2007

The Odious Debt Doctrine After Iraq, Jai Damle

Law and Contemporary Problems

The odious debt doctrine has experienced renewed popularity in the past few years; it has been heralded by academics, political commentators, economists, and politicians as a mechanism to alleviate burdens imposed by illegitimate rulers. In its classic formulation, the doctrine provides that a regime's debt is odious, and thus unenforceable, if the state's people did not consent to the debt, the proceeds from the debt were not used for the benefit of the people, and the regime's creditors had knowledge of the first two conditions. In 2003, the newly instated Iraqi regime began negotiations to restructure that country's debt, much …


Odious Debt Wears Two Faces: Systemic Illegitimacy, Problems, And Opportunities In Traditional Odious Debt Conceptions In Globalized Economic Regimes, Larry Catá Backer Oct 2007

Odious Debt Wears Two Faces: Systemic Illegitimacy, Problems, And Opportunities In Traditional Odious Debt Conceptions In Globalized Economic Regimes, Larry Catá Backer

Law and Contemporary Problems

Backer examines how the traditional notion of odious debt as a method of repudiating sovereign debt may undergo a conceptual revolution as it changes focus from the illegitimacy of governments obtaining loans to the illegitimacy of the systems through which such loans are made and enforced generally. He focus his analysis on the conceptual framework Fidel Castro sought to introduce into the debate about the legitimacy of sovereign debt and the extent to which this reframing might influence international institutional approaches.


Odious Debts Or Odious Regimes, Patrick Bolton, David Skeel Oct 2007

Odious Debts Or Odious Regimes, Patrick Bolton, David Skeel

Law and Contemporary Problems

Odious regimes have always been there. That there is no silver-bullet solution that will prevent odious regimes from arising, or stymie them once they do, is evident from the plethora of responses employed by the international community once a regime's odiousness becomes clear. Current odious debt doctrine dates back to a 1927 treatise by a wandering Russian academic named Alexander Sack. The Sack definition contemplates a debt-by-debt approach to questionable borrowing. If a loan is used to benefit the population--to build a highway or water-treatment plant, for instance--the obligation would be fully enforceable, no matter how pernicious the borrower regime. …


Odious Debt, Old And New: The Legal Intellectual History Of An Idea, James V. Feinerman Oct 2007

Odious Debt, Old And New: The Legal Intellectual History Of An Idea, James V. Feinerman

Law and Contemporary Problems

In a sense, all debts are odious; that is, to use dictionary definitions, "hateful; disgusting; offensive." Yet insofar as international economic law today is concerned, only a certain few debts can be considered "odious debts" in order to contest and perhaps eventually to repudiate them. Here, Feinerman examines the concepts of odious debt and related international legal phenomena, in both historical and contemporary context, with a view of determining the role that denomination of certain debts as odious may play in the overall process of sovereign debt rescheduling.


Partially Odious Debts?, Omri Ben-Shahar, Mitu Gulati Oct 2007

Partially Odious Debts?, Omri Ben-Shahar, Mitu Gulati

Law and Contemporary Problems

Ben-Shahar borrows from a rich private-law tradition to explore the treatment of odious debt as a problem analogous to allocation of liability in private law. Drawing on the economic analysis of private law, it develops insights as to the structure of an optimal liability scheme. Under this approach, liability is imposed not on the basis of some intrinsic judgment as to the parties' relative blameworthiness, but rather in a forward-looking fashion, on parties who are best suited to take actions to prevent the loss. In addition, liability is imposed on a magnitude tailored to induce an optimal level of precautionary …


Devilry, Complicity, And Greed: Transitional Justice And Odious Debt, David C. Gray Jul 2007

Devilry, Complicity, And Greed: Transitional Justice And Odious Debt, David C. Gray

Law and Contemporary Problems

Several issues relating to odious debt and contemporary efforts to expand the odious debt doctrine to cover all debts of odious regimes are maddeningly complex, implicating difficult issues in areas ranging from the international law of state succession to the law of commercial paper--itself a source of biannual trauma for thousands of bar aspirants. However, the scope of the debate as it has been developed in the literature is too narrow and, therefore, the questions posed too simple. In particular, any analysis of odious debt must account for issues that inhere to transitions and transitional justice. Here, Gray make some …


Renegotiating The Odious Debt Doctrine, Tai-Heng Cheng Jul 2007

Renegotiating The Odious Debt Doctrine, Tai-Heng Cheng

Law and Contemporary Problems

Following the United States' invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq,' the US government argued that the successor government in Iraq was not responsible for Iraq's Saddam-era debt under the purported doctrine of odious-regime debt. This purported doctrine apparently excused--by operation of law--all successor regimes from repaying debts that were incurred by oppressive predecessor regimes. Here, Cheng presents three-part response regarding the purported rule that oppressive debts of a predecessor government do not bind its successor.


A Critique Of The Odious Debt Doctrine, Albert H. Choi, Eric A. Posner Jul 2007

A Critique Of The Odious Debt Doctrine, Albert H. Choi, Eric A. Posner

Law and Contemporary Problems

Choi and Posner indicate that it is unclear whether the doctrine will improve the welfare of the population that might be subject to a dictatorship in terms of the odious debt doctrine. The traditional backward-looking defense of the odious debt doctrine, which suggests that the doctrine is costless because it releases a suffering population from an unjust debt, is seriously incomplete. Although in specific cases the benefits of loan sanctions may exceed the costs, the defenders of the doctrine have not made the empirical case that the net benefits are sufficiently high in the aggregate as to warrant routine application …


Odious, Not Debt, Anna Gelpern Jul 2007

Odious, Not Debt, Anna Gelpern

Law and Contemporary Problems

The US invasion of Iraq in 2003 revived public and academic debate about a wobbly old doctrine of international law: the Doctrine of Odious Debt. This doctrine allows governments to disavow debts incurred by their predecessors without the consent of or benefit for the people, provided creditors knew of the taint. It has roots in nineteenth century jostles over colonial possessions. However, for the past eighty years, Odious Debt's rhetorical appeal has vastly outstripped its "legal vitality." Here, Gelpern argues that the Doctrine of Odious Debt frames the problem of odious debt in a way that excludes a large number, …


Sovereigns, Trustees, Guardians: Private-Law Concepts And The Limits Of Legitimate State Power, Jedediah Purdy, Kimberly Fielding Jul 2007

Sovereigns, Trustees, Guardians: Private-Law Concepts And The Limits Of Legitimate State Power, Jedediah Purdy, Kimberly Fielding

Law and Contemporary Problems

One major tradition of understanding the powers and duties of sovereigns has particular relevance to arguments for revival and refurbishment of the odious debt doctrine. Here, Purdy and Fielding survey the critical role of private-law concepts in the development of this tradition. In this account, the state is a constructed and purposive legal actor, composed of a set of powers assigned by its subjects for the pursuit of certain human interests and bound by the obligation to secure and respect those interests. Moreover, they narrate that if there are inherent powers in a sovereign, they are only those that are …


The Policies Of State Succession: Harmonizing Self-Determination And Global Order In The Twenty-First Century, Robert D. Sloane Jan 2007

The Policies Of State Succession: Harmonizing Self-Determination And Global Order In The Twenty-First Century, Robert D. Sloane

Faculty Scholarship

In State Succession and Commercial Obligations (2006), Tai-Heng Cheng applies the New Haven School methodology to an opaque and unsettled body of international law: that governing the commercial rights and duties of states, creditors, and other participants in the unruly process of state succession. Rather than work within inherited conceptual and doctrinal frameworks, which have seldom proved either helpful or descriptively accurate, Cheng provides a fresh perspective on the issues. He argues that a policy-oriented perspective on state succession ameliorates the "descriptive inaccuracy" and "normative deficit" of inherited theories. Part I of this review considers the former claim; Part II …


The Application Of The International Law Of State Succession To The United States: A Reassessment Of The Treaty Between The Republic Of Texas And The Cherokee Indians, Jason C. Nelson Oct 2006

The Application Of The International Law Of State Succession To The United States: A Reassessment Of The Treaty Between The Republic Of Texas And The Cherokee Indians, Jason C. Nelson

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

No abstract provided.


Implications Of The Altmann Decision On Former Yugoslav States, Milena Sterio Oct 2004

Implications Of The Altmann Decision On Former Yugoslav States, Milena Sterio

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The law of state succession is one of the most complicated areas of law. Scholars and politicians have seldom reached a consensus on the exact public international law rules in this area. The recent breakup of former Yugoslavia exemplifies some of the difficulties relating to, inter alia, the distinction between dissolution and secession, the allocation of debt and assets among successor states, and more particularly, the resolution of individual disputes among citizens of former Yugoslav republics. The latter issue has been particularly important, as numerous individuals have lost their life savings and immovable property during the internal war that ravaged …


Les Successions D'Etats : Pratiques Françaises, Evelyne Lagrange Aug 2003

Les Successions D'Etats : Pratiques Françaises, Evelyne Lagrange

Louisiana Law Review

No abstract provided.


State Succession, Then And Now, With Special Reference To The Louisiana Purchase (1803), C. Emanuelli Aug 2003

State Succession, Then And Now, With Special Reference To The Louisiana Purchase (1803), C. Emanuelli

Louisiana Law Review

No abstract provided.


Successions Of States: The French Approach, Evelyne Lagrange Aug 2003

Successions Of States: The French Approach, Evelyne Lagrange

Louisiana Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Pedagogical Code, Michael Mcauley Aug 2003

The Pedagogical Code, Michael Mcauley

Louisiana Law Review

No abstract provided.


Some Legal Problems With Trusteeship, Ruth E. Gordon Apr 1995

Some Legal Problems With Trusteeship, Ruth E. Gordon

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Musical Chairs: The Dissolution Of States And Membership In The United Nations, Michael P. Scharf Jan 1995

Musical Chairs: The Dissolution Of States And Membership In The United Nations, Michael P. Scharf

Cornell International Law Journal

No abstract provided.


State Succession To Debts And Assets: The Modern Law And Policy, Paul Williams, Jennifer Harris Jan 1994

State Succession To Debts And Assets: The Modern Law And Policy, Paul Williams, Jennifer Harris

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

When a state dissolves, or when territorial entities of a state break away and become independent states, those states and other members of the international community are faced with a host of legal questions concerning the continuation of the predecessor state’s treaty obligations, succession to the predecessor state’s membership in various international organizations, an the allocation of its debts and assets. This article addresses the legal rules governing the allocation of debts and assets among successor states, and in particular the role of the creditor states in formulating that allocation.


State Succession To Debts And Assets: The Modern Law And Policy, Paul R. Williams, Jennifer Harris Dec 1993

State Succession To Debts And Assets: The Modern Law And Policy, Paul R. Williams, Jennifer Harris

Paul Williams

When a state dissolves, or when territorial entities of a state break away and become independent states, those states and other members of the international community are faced with a host of legal questions concerning the continuation of the predecessor state’s treaty obligations, succession to the predecessor state’s membership in various international organizations, an the allocation of its debts and assets. This article addresses the legal rules governing the allocation of debts and assets among successor states, and in particular the role of the creditor states in formulating that allocation.


Consensual Merger As A Means Of State Succession And Its Relation To Treaty Obligations, Ronald J. Klein Jan 1981

Consensual Merger As A Means Of State Succession And Its Relation To Treaty Obligations, Ronald J. Klein

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


Consensual Merger As A Means Of State Succession And Its Relation To Treaty Obligations, Ronald J. Klein Jan 1981

Consensual Merger As A Means Of State Succession And Its Relation To Treaty Obligations, Ronald J. Klein

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.