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Full-Text Articles in Law

Sacrificial Attorney: Assignment Of Legal Malpractice Claims, The, John M. Limbaugh Jan 2000

Sacrificial Attorney: Assignment Of Legal Malpractice Claims, The, John M. Limbaugh

Missouri Law Review

The Missouri Court of Appeals for the Western District of Missouri ruled, in a case of first impression, that causes of action for legal malpractice are nonassignable. The court found that permitting assignments would be contrary to public policy because assignments would create a marketplace for legal malpractice claims, jeopardize the attorney's duties of loyalty and confidentiality to the client, and restrict access to competent legal services. This Note agrees with the court's result but will explore and challenge the public policy arguments against assignment of legal malpractice claims.


The Attorney As Duelist's Friend: Lessons From The Code Duello, Douglas H. Yarn Jan 2000

The Attorney As Duelist's Friend: Lessons From The Code Duello, Douglas H. Yarn

Case Western Reserve Law Review

No abstract provided.


Antitrust Immunity, The First Amendment & Settlements: Defining The Boundaries Of The Right To Petition, Raymond Shih Ray Ku Jan 2000

Antitrust Immunity, The First Amendment & Settlements: Defining The Boundaries Of The Right To Petition, Raymond Shih Ray Ku

Faculty Publications

Specifically, this Article examines whether settlement agreements and consent decrees resulting from what would otherwise be immunized litigation are protected from antitrust scrutiny and liability under Noerr. In order to conduct this analysis, this Article develops a methodology for determining immunity by focusing the immunity examination upon the means used to petition government and the source of the alleged injuries. Ultimately, private conduct is immune from antitrust scrutiny when it represents a valid attempt to persuade an independent governmental decision-maker in an effort to solicit government action, and the alleged injuries result from that persuasive effort. The validity of any ...


Governments, Citizens, And Injurious Industries, Hanoch Dagan, James J. White Jan 2000

Governments, Citizens, And Injurious Industries, Hanoch Dagan, James J. White

Articles

In this Article, Professors Hanoch Dagan and James White study the most recent challenge raised by mass torts litigation: the interference of governments with the bilateral relationship between citizens and injurious industries. Using the tobacco settlement as their case study, Dagan and White explore the important benefits and the grave dangers of recognizing governments' entitlement to reimbursement for costs they have incurred in preventing or ameliorating their citizens' injuries. They further demonstrate that the current law can help capture these benefits and guard against the entailing risks, showing how subrogation law can serve as the legal foundation of the governments ...