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Full-Text Articles in Law

Revisiting Dura Pharmaceuticals: Loss Causation & Criminal Securities Fraud Sentencing, Todd W. Barnet Dec 2019

Revisiting Dura Pharmaceuticals: Loss Causation & Criminal Securities Fraud Sentencing, Todd W. Barnet

University of Denver Criminal Law Review

No abstract provided.


Securities Law Research, Adeen Postar Aug 2019

Securities Law Research, Adeen Postar

Adeen Postar

This research guide provides an overview of resources and search strategies for researching Securities Law: primary and secondary materials, specialized databases, and government websites. It also identifies sources for researching case law.


Securities Laws As Foreign Policy, Karen E. Woody Jul 2019

Securities Laws As Foreign Policy, Karen E. Woody

Karen Woody

No abstract provided.


Tangled Up In Blue: Adapting Securities Laws To Initial Coin Offerings, Ethan D. Trotz Jul 2019

Tangled Up In Blue: Adapting Securities Laws To Initial Coin Offerings, Ethan D. Trotz

Northern Illinois University Law Review

Issuers of blockchain-based projects have increasingly turned to Initial Coin Offerings to raise capital. Many of these offerings have similar characteristics to securities offerings, yet are often not registered or exempt from securities laws. Initial Coin Offerings present numerous risks to investors, including fraud, inadequate disclosures, and a lack of remedies. The Securities & Exchange Commission must step in to protect investors and limit losses. One way to do so is through regulation. The Securities & Exchange Commission should use existing regulations for Initial Public Offerings and securities offerings as a guideline. However, blockchain-based offerings present unique issues never before …


De Facto Shareholder Primacy, Jeff Schwartz Jun 2019

De Facto Shareholder Primacy, Jeff Schwartz

Utah Law Faculty Scholarship

For generations, scholars have debated the purpose of corporations. Should they maximize shareholder value or balance shareholder interests against the corporation’s broader social and economic impact? A longstanding and fundamental premise of this debate is that, ultimately, it is up to corporations to decide. But this understanding is obsolete. Securities law robs corporations of this choice. Once corporations go public, the securities laws effectively require that they maximize share price at the expense of all other goals. This Article is the first to identify the profound impact that the securities laws have on the purpose of public firms — a …


Reflections On Dual Regulation Of Securities: A Case For Reallocation Of Regulatory Responsibilities, Manning Gilbert Warren Iii Apr 2019

Reflections On Dual Regulation Of Securities: A Case For Reallocation Of Regulatory Responsibilities, Manning Gilbert Warren Iii

Manning G. Warren III

I address the scope of state regulatory power that remains given the National Securities Markets Improvement Act of 1996's dictates and prerogatives. I then suggest for consideration significant alterations to the regulatory role traditionally performed by the states.


When Congress Acts: Judicial Procedural Innovation And The Pslra, Briana L. Rosenbaum Apr 2019

When Congress Acts: Judicial Procedural Innovation And The Pslra, Briana L. Rosenbaum

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


The Problem Of Sunsets, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon Jan 2019

The Problem Of Sunsets, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon

All Faculty Scholarship

An increasing percentage of corporations are going public with dual class stock in which the shares owned by the founders or other corporate insiders have greater voting rights than the shares sold to public investors. Some commentators have criticized the dual class structure as unfair to public investors by reducing the accountability of insiders; others have defended the value of dual class in encouraging innovation by providing founders with insulation from market pressure that enables them to pursue their idiosyncratic vision.

The debate over whether dual class structures increase or decrease corporate value is, to date, unresolved. Empirical studies have …


Undoing A Deal With The Devil: Some Challenges For Congress's Proposed Reform Of Insider Trading Plans, John P. Anderson Jan 2019

Undoing A Deal With The Devil: Some Challenges For Congress's Proposed Reform Of Insider Trading Plans, John P. Anderson

Journal Articles

The adoption of Rule 10b5-1 was, in a manner of speaking, a deal with the devil that the SEC and some lawmakers now appear to regret having made. The problem is that, as is often the case with such a deal, it cannot be easily undone. I identify challenges presented by the restrictions on Trading Plan use that Congress has proposed in the Corporate Insiders Act. In light of these challenges, I argue that effective Trading Plan reform cannot be accomplished by simply restricting the use of Trading Plans while leaving Rule 10b5-1(b)'s awareness test in place. If there is …


Collaborative Approaches To Blockchain Regulation: The Brooklyn Project Example, Patrick Berarducci Jan 2019

Collaborative Approaches To Blockchain Regulation: The Brooklyn Project Example, Patrick Berarducci

Cleveland State Law Review

Today, I am going to discuss, at a high level, blockchain technology—what it is, what are its unique features that could revolutionize markets and economies, and how it could impact law and regulation. That is a lot to cover—far too much in the time allotted. So I will keep things at a very high level and hopefully pique some interest in everyone to dig deeper on their own.


Mootness Fees, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon, Randall Thomas Jan 2019

Mootness Fees, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon, Randall Thomas

All Faculty Scholarship

In response to a sharp increase in litigation challenging mergers, the Delaware Chancery Court issued the 2016 Trulia decision, which substantively reduced the attractiveness of Delaware as a forum for these suits. In this Article, we empirically assess the response of plaintiffs’ attorneys to these developments. Specifically, we document a troubling trend—the flight of merger litigation to federal court where these cases are overwhelmingly resolved through voluntary dismissals that provide no benefit to the plaintiff class but generate a payment to plaintiffs’ counsel in the form of a mootness fee. In 2018, for example, 77% of deals with litigation were …


Institutional Investors As Short Sellers?, Peter Molk, Frank Partnoy Jan 2019

Institutional Investors As Short Sellers?, Peter Molk, Frank Partnoy

UF Law Faculty Publications

Short selling has the potential to improve the efficiency and fairness of equity markets. Yet institutional investors face both private and regulatory constraints to short selling. We document these obstacles and consider the potential benefits of removing them. We advocate that institutional investors engage in more short selling as part of overall net-long equity strategies, such as a leveraged passive equity index combined with an actively managed short position of a size comparable to the amount of leverage.


The New Titans Of Wall Street: A Theoretical Framework For Passive Investors, Jill E. Fisch, Asaf Hamdani, Steven Davidoff Solomon Jan 2019

The New Titans Of Wall Street: A Theoretical Framework For Passive Investors, Jill E. Fisch, Asaf Hamdani, Steven Davidoff Solomon

All Faculty Scholarship

Passive investors — ETFs and index funds — are the most important development in modern day capital markets, dictating trillions of dollars in capital flows and increasingly owning much of corporate America. Neither the business model of passive funds, nor the way that they engage with their portfolio companies, however, is well understood, and misperceptions of both have led some commentators to call for passive investors to be subject to increased regulation and even disenfranchisement. Specifically, this literature takes a narrow view both of the market in which passive investors compete to manage customer funds and of passive investors’ participation …


Mootness Fees, Randall S. Thomas, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven D. Solomon Jan 2019

Mootness Fees, Randall S. Thomas, Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven D. Solomon

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

In response to a sharp increase in litigation challenging mergers, the Delaware Chancery Court issued the 2016 Trulia decision, which substantively reduced the attractiveness of Delaware as a forum for these suits. In this Article, we empirically assess the response of plaintiffs'attorneys to these developments. Specifically, we document a troubling trend-the flight of merger litigation to federal court where these cases are overwhelmingly resolved through voluntary dismissals that provide no benefit to the plaintiff class but generate a payment to plaintiffs'counsel in the form of a mootness fee. In 2018, for example, 77% of deals with litigation were challenged in …