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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Blue Devil's In The Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work, David A. Grenardo Apr 2019

The Blue Devil's In The Details: How A Free Market Approach To Compensating College Athletes Would Work, David A. Grenardo

Pepperdine Law Review

Everyone involved in the business of major college athletics, except the athletes, receives compensation based on a free market system. The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (NCAA) cap on athlete compensation violates antitrust law, and athletes should be allowed to earn their free market value as everyone else does in this country. This Article provides a detailed approach to compensating college athletes under a free market model, which includes a salary cap, the terms of a proposed standard player’s contract, a discussion of who can represent players, and payment simulations for football and basketball teams. A free market approach would not …


Efficiency-Wage Theory And Law Firm Pay, Dongyu "Eddie" Wang Jan 2012

Efficiency-Wage Theory And Law Firm Pay, Dongyu "Eddie" Wang

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform Caveat

Every first-year law student knows that Big Law pays $160,000 a year. In fact, this number is likely the biggest incentive for applying in the minds of most law-school hopefuls. Taking New York City as an example, a quick look at Vault’s salary data reveals that, indeed, the large majority of New York firms with available salary data pay first-year associates exactly $160,000.


Is U.S. Ceo Compensation Inefficient Pay Without Performance?, John E. Core, Wayne R. Guay, Randall S. Thompson May 2005

Is U.S. Ceo Compensation Inefficient Pay Without Performance?, John E. Core, Wayne R. Guay, Randall S. Thompson

Michigan Law Review

In Pay Without Performance, Professors Lucian Bebchuk and Jesse Fried develop and summarize the leading critiques of current executive compensation practices in the United States. This book, and their highly influential earlier article, Managerial Power and Rent Extraction in the Design of Executive Compensation, with David Walker offer a negative, if mainstream, assessment of the state of U.S. executive compensation: U.S. executive compensation practices are failing in a widespread manner, and much systemic reform is needed. The purpose of our Review is to summarize the book and to offer some counterarguments to try to balance what is becoming …


Constitutional Law-Due Process-Validity Of State Statute Requiring Public Employees To Take Loyalty Oath, James W. Callison, S.Ed. May 1953

Constitutional Law-Due Process-Validity Of State Statute Requiring Public Employees To Take Loyalty Oath, James W. Callison, S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

A statute of Oklahoma required public employees to take an oath that, among other things, they were not, for five years previous had not been, and would not become, affiliated with an organization which advocated the overthrow of the Government of the United States or of the State of Oklahoma by force or violence or other unlawful means or which had been determined by the United States Attorney General to be a Communist front or subversive organization. A citizen and taxpayer sought to enjoin payment of salaries to teachers at Oklahoma A. & M. College who had not taken the …