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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law Library Blog (September 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Sep 2021

Law Library Blog (September 2021): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Lawyering Paradoxes: Making Meaning Of The Contradictions, Susan P. Sturm Jan 2019

Lawyering Paradoxes: Making Meaning Of The Contradictions, Susan P. Sturm

Faculty Scholarship

Effective lawyering requires the ability to manage contradictory yet interdependent practices. In their role as traditionally understood, lawyers must fight, judge, debate, minimize risk, and advance clients’ interests. Yet increasingly, lawyers must ALSO collaborate, build trust, innovate, enable effective risk-taking, and hold clients accountable for adhering to societal values. Law students and lawyers alike struggle, often unproductively, to reconcile these tensions. Law schools often address them as a dilemma requiring a choice or overlook the contradictions that interfere with their integration.

This Article argues instead that these seemingly contradictory practices can be brought together through the theory and action of ...


Navigating Scholarship Discovery, Research Impact, And Open Access, Carol A. Watson, Jean-Gabriel Bankier, Gregg Gordon Nov 2018

Navigating Scholarship Discovery, Research Impact, And Open Access, Carol A. Watson, Jean-Gabriel Bankier, Gregg Gordon

Presentations

The leadership teams of bepress and SSRN will present the findings of an integration pilot conducted in partnership with Columbia Law School’s Arthur W. Diamond Law Library, the University of Georgia School of Law’s Alexander Campbell King Law Library, and Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business. Expanding the reach of open access scholarship is central to the mission of both bepress and SSRN. However for many institutions, the separation of the two platforms had created barriers to faculty engagement and the building of successful open access initiatives. With both companies now part of the Elsevier portfolio ...


Bepress & Ssrn Pilot Presentation, Carol A. Watson, Thomas J. Striepe Jul 2018

Bepress & Ssrn Pilot Presentation, Carol A. Watson, Thomas J. Striepe

Presentations

A panel discussion announcing and sharing information about the joint pilot project exploring the integration between bepress and SSRN platforms launched in March 2018.


Rethinking Digital Repositories And The Future Of Open Access, Margaret Schilt, Karen Shephard, Carol A. Watson Jan 2018

Rethinking Digital Repositories And The Future Of Open Access, Margaret Schilt, Karen Shephard, Carol A. Watson

Scholarly Works

Over the last two years, changes in the legal publishing arena involving digital repository platforms have raised concerns about the future of open access. This article reviews the current status of the various repository platforms and how they impact legal scholarship. The article goes on to analyze the areas that law libraries should focus on in platform selection.


Measuring Scholarly Impact: A Guide For Law School Administrators And Legal Scholars, Gary M. Lucas Jr May 2017

Measuring Scholarly Impact: A Guide For Law School Administrators And Legal Scholars, Gary M. Lucas Jr

Gary M. Lucas Jr.

The author intends for this Essay to serve as a guide for law deans and legal scholars interested in measuring the impact of legal scholarship. In addition, university administrators should find it helpful for comparing the impact of their own law faculty’s scholarship with the scholarship of law faculties at other universities. The primary obstacle to such comparisons is a dearth of publicly available information. To that end, the Essay recommends that each law school create a Google Scholar profile for its faculty and explains the procedures for doing so. By acting on this recommendation, administrators would dramatically improve ...


Measuring Scholarly Impact: A Guide For Law School Administrators And Legal Scholars, Gary M. Lucas Jr Apr 2017

Measuring Scholarly Impact: A Guide For Law School Administrators And Legal Scholars, Gary M. Lucas Jr

Faculty Scholarship

The author intends for this Essay to serve as a guide for law deans and legal scholars interested in measuring the impact of legal scholarship. In addition, university administrators should find it helpful for comparing the impact of their own law faculty’s scholarship with the scholarship of law faculties at other universities. The primary obstacle to such comparisons is a dearth of publicly available information. To that end, the Essay recommends that each law school create a Google Scholar profile for its faculty and explains the procedures for doing so. By acting on this recommendation, administrators would dramatically improve ...


Measuring Law School Clinics, Colleen F. Shanahan, Jeffrey Selbin, Alyx Mark, Anna E. Carpenter Jan 2017

Measuring Law School Clinics, Colleen F. Shanahan, Jeffrey Selbin, Alyx Mark, Anna E. Carpenter

Faculty Scholarship

Legal education reformers have long argued that law school clinics address two related needs: first, clinics teach students to be lawyers; and second, clinics serve low-income clients. In clinics, so the argument goes, law students working under the close supervision of faculty members learn the requisite skills to be good practitioners and professionals. In turn, clinical law students serve clients with civil and criminal justice needs that would otherwise go unmet.

Though we have these laudable teaching and service goals – and a vast literature describing the role of clinics in both the teaching and service dimensions – we have scant empirical ...


The Paperless Chase, Steven J. Mulroy Jan 2016

The Paperless Chase, Steven J. Mulroy

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Future Of Law Review Platforms, Andrea Charlow Jan 2016

The Future Of Law Review Platforms, Andrea Charlow

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Associate Dean For Research In The Age Of The Internet, B. Jessie Hill Mar 2015

The Associate Dean For Research In The Age Of The Internet, B. Jessie Hill

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Jerry Mashaw And The Public Law Curriculum, Peter L. Strauss Jan 2015

Jerry Mashaw And The Public Law Curriculum, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

Written for a Yale Festschrift celebrating Professor Jerry Mashaw’s extraordinary life of scholarship, this essay takes his first published teaching materials as the jumping off place for an essay on the impact of early choices about the teaching of public law courses on the materials and issues our students see, and the changes that might be in the wind as new materials on Legislation and the Regulatory State emerge. With Richard Merrill, Jerry 40 years ago designed “The American Public Law System” for the first year of law school, treating legislation and administrative action as subjects worthy of serious ...


A Crib Sheet For Contracts Profs, Victor P. Goldberg Jan 2015

A Crib Sheet For Contracts Profs, Victor P. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

Over the last two decades I have been digging into the facts on a number of contracts cases, many of them featured in casebooks. I have collected the material in two books; one appeared in 2006 and the other is hot off the presses. This brief paper provides a roadmap for professors who might want more depth on the cases than is provided in the decisions or the casebooks. A recurring theme in the two books is that parties designing their contractual relationships must deal with change. This shows up in the manner in which they price the option to ...


Teaching The Newly Essential Knowledge, Skills, And Values In A Changing World, Eliza Vorenberg, Cynthia F. Adcock, Eden E. Harrington, Elizabeth Kane, Lisa Bliss, Robin Boyle, Conrad Johnson, Susan Schechter, David Udell Jan 2015

Teaching The Newly Essential Knowledge, Skills, And Values In A Changing World, Eliza Vorenberg, Cynthia F. Adcock, Eden E. Harrington, Elizabeth Kane, Lisa Bliss, Robin Boyle, Conrad Johnson, Susan Schechter, David Udell

Faculty Scholarship

This chapter of Building on Best Practices: Transforming Legal Education in a Changing World has contributions from many authors:

  • Section A, Professional Identity Formation, includes:
    • Teaching Knowledge, Skills, and Values of Professional Identity Formation, by Larry O. Natt Gantt, II & Benjamin V. Madison III,
    • Integrating Professionalism into Doctrinally-Focused Courses, by Paula Schaefer,
    • Learning Professional Responsibility, by Clark D. Cunningham, and
    • Teaching Leadership, by Deborah L. Rhode.
  • Section B, Pro Bono as a Professional Value, is by Cynthia F. Adcock, Eden E. Harrington, Elizabeth Kane, Susan Schechter, David S. Udell & Eliza Vorenberg.
  • Section C, The Relational Skills of the Law, includes ...


Robert Katzmann's "Judging Statutes", Peter L. Strauss Jan 2015

Robert Katzmann's "Judging Statutes", Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

Chief Judge Robert Katzmann has written a compelling short book about statutory interpretation, stressing the importance to sensible interpretation of knowing Congress as an institution (as few judges do). Both as a resource for teaching, and as a useful compendium of the current literature, it is a very welcome addition to the genre. Though he is careful and fair to both, readers will not be surprised to find his views on the purposive rather than the textualist side of the current disputes. The book could set the framework for a two or three hour legislation class supplemented by cases and ...


Reaching Backward And Stretching Forward: Teaching For Transfer In Law School Clinics, Shaun Archer, James Parry Eyster, James J. Kelly Jr., Tonya Kowalski, Colleen F. Shanahan Jan 2014

Reaching Backward And Stretching Forward: Teaching For Transfer In Law School Clinics, Shaun Archer, James Parry Eyster, James J. Kelly Jr., Tonya Kowalski, Colleen F. Shanahan

Faculty Scholarship

In thinking about education, teachers may spend more time considering what to teach than how to teach. Unfortunately, traditional teaching techniques have limited effectiveness in their ability to help students retain and apply the knowledge either in later classes or in their professional work. What, then, is the value of our teaching efforts if students are unable to transfer the ideas and skills they have learned to later situations?

Teaching for transfer is important to the authors of this article, four clinical professors and one psychologist. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to some of the ...


Educating The Invincibles: Strategies For Teaching The Millennial Generation In Law School, Emily A. Benfer, Colleen F. Shanahan Jan 2013

Educating The Invincibles: Strategies For Teaching The Millennial Generation In Law School, Emily A. Benfer, Colleen F. Shanahan

Faculty Scholarship

Each new generation of law students presents its own set of challenges for law teachers seeking to develop competent and committed members of the legal profession. This article aims to train legal educators to recognize their students’ generational learning style and to deliver a tailored education that supports the development of skilled attorneys. To help legal educators better understand the newest generation of law students, this article explores the traits associated with the Millennial Generation of law students, including their perspective on themselves and others, on education and on work. It then provides detailed and specific strategies for teaching millennial ...


The Law School Matrix: Reforming Legal Education In A Culture Of Competition And Conformity, Susan P. Sturm, Lani Guinier Jan 2007

The Law School Matrix: Reforming Legal Education In A Culture Of Competition And Conformity, Susan P. Sturm, Lani Guinier

Faculty Scholarship

The recent energy for reforming legal education focuses on curricular changes that expand students' understanding of what law is, move beyond adjudication and the courtroom, introduce broader forms of knowledge, and develop a wider range of skills. These well-intentioned and carefully analyzed programmatic initiatives may nevertheless founder because of the cultural mismatch between these proposals and the institutions they seek to change.

In this essay we argue that successful reform requires taking account of the culture of competition and conformity that permeates law schools. By culture we mean the incentive structures and peer pressure, dominant rituals and unspoken habits of ...


Crafting A Scholarly Persona: A Panel Discussion, Ian Ayres, Paul H. Robinson, Carol Sanger, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan Jan 2007

Crafting A Scholarly Persona: A Panel Discussion, Ian Ayres, Paul H. Robinson, Carol Sanger, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan

Faculty Scholarship

This is an edited transcript of Crafting a Scholarly Persona, the Scholarship Section's program from the AALS Annual Meeting in 2007. During this program, three established scholars, Ian Ayres, Paul Robinson, and Carol Sanger, discussed their individual career paths – How they chose their article topics, what the goals of their scholarship are, how they view their research agendas, etc. The discussion was intended roughly to mirror Bravo's Inside the Actor's Studio.


Assessing The Ssrn-Based Law School Rankings, Theodore Eisenberg Jan 2006

Assessing The Ssrn-Based Law School Rankings, Theodore Eisenberg

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

One noteworthy feature of the SSRN-based rankings is the high correlation between them and other rankings. Black and Caron report correlation coefficients between their two Social Science Research Network (SSRN) school rankings (one based on downloads from SSRN and one based on the number of papers posted on SSRN) and six other published rankings. The correlations provide a useful and creative measure of consistency across studies. If ranking studies are highly correlated, then the least expensive and most efficient study to conduct can be used without incurring the expense and delay of the more labor-intensive ranking methods. SSRN has a ...


Assessing The Ssrn-Based Law School Rankings, Theodore Eisenberg Jan 2006

Assessing The Ssrn-Based Law School Rankings, Theodore Eisenberg

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: The Next Generation of Law School Rankings held April 15, 2005 at Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington.


Ranking Law Schools: Using Ssrn To Measure Scholarly Performance, Bernard S. Black, Paul L. Caron Jan 2006

Ranking Law Schools: Using Ssrn To Measure Scholarly Performance, Bernard S. Black, Paul L. Caron

Indiana Law Journal

There are several methods for ranking the scholarly performance of law faculties, including reputation surveys (U.S. News, Leiter); publication counts (Lindgren and Seltzer, Leiter); and citation counts (Eisenberg and Wells, Leiter). Each offers a useful but partial picture offaculty performance. We explore here whether the new "beta" SSRN-based measures (number of downloads and number ofposted papers) can offer a different, also useful, albeit also partial, picture. Our modest claim is that SSRNbased measures can address some of the deficiencies in these other measures and thus play a valuable role in the rankings tapestry. For example, SSRN offers real-time data ...


Transsystemia – Are We Approaching A New Langdellian Moment? Is Mcgill Leading The Way?, Peter L. Strauss Jan 2006

Transsystemia – Are We Approaching A New Langdellian Moment? Is Mcgill Leading The Way?, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

Late in the 19th century, as our economy was transformed into a truly national one, legal education was transformed by the adoption of a teaching technique – Langdell's Socratic Method – that succeeded in creating law graduates confident of their capacity to be professionals in ANY American common law jurisdiction – national lawyers even in the absence of a national common law. Today, as the economy is once again transforming, now internationally, lawyers have an equivalent need to be confident of their capacity to perform across national boundaries. The paper briefly describes the way in which McGill University's Faculty of Law ...


Editing, Carol Sanger Jan 1993

Editing, Carol Sanger

Faculty Scholarship

We are all familiar with the process. At its best, law review editing, like editing elsewhere in the academic and literary worlds, results in a piece improved in style, structure, and content. Too often, however, law review articles are not so much improved as simply changed, sometimes hundreds of times within a single manuscript.

My purpose here is not to complain line by line about various dissatisfactions with the editing of my little review. I accept that authors, like teenagers convinced the world is focused on their every imperfection, are more aware of perceived deficiencies in an article than any ...