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Reproductive technologies

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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Welcome To The New Dignity, Donna M. Hughes Feb 2021

Welcome To The New Dignity, Donna M. Hughes

Dignity: A Journal of Analysis of Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


Artavia Murillo V. Costa Rica: The Inter-American Court On Human Rights’ Promotion Of Non-Existent Human Rights Obligations To Authorize Artificial Reproductive Technologies, Ligia M. De Jesus Jan 2014

Artavia Murillo V. Costa Rica: The Inter-American Court On Human Rights’ Promotion Of Non-Existent Human Rights Obligations To Authorize Artificial Reproductive Technologies, Ligia M. De Jesus

Ligia M. De Jesus

In Artavia Murillo v. Costa Rica, the Inter-American Court on Human Rights examined the question of whether Costa Rica may, under the American Convention on Human Rights, protect human embryos from destruction by banning in vitro fertilization (IVF) in its jurisdiction. The case provoked the Inter-American Court of Human Rights' first debate on the existence of international human rights obligations to authorize and fund artificial reproductive technologies as well as its first interpretation on the right to life from conception, established in Article 4(1) of the American Convention. In the judgment, issued over one year ago, the Inter-American court ...


Cloning And The Lgbti Family: Cautious Optimism, Erez Aloni Dec 2010

Cloning And The Lgbti Family: Cautious Optimism, Erez Aloni

Erez Aloni

While fertile, opposite-sex couples can have children who carry a mix of their genes without involving third parties in the reproductive process, this option is not available to the majority of the LGBTI community. If this were simply a biological fact, it would not raise any equal protection or other constitutional issues. However, emerging technologies in the field of reproductive cloning may offer the LGBTI community the chance to have genetically related children—possibly even with a mix of both partners’ genes. As such, bans on federally funding research that would help to refine and ensure the safety and efficacy ...


Regulating Sperm Donation: Why Requiring Exposed Donation Is Not The Answer, Vanessa L. Pi Aug 2009

Regulating Sperm Donation: Why Requiring Exposed Donation Is Not The Answer, Vanessa L. Pi

Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy

[...] the risk of incest and consanguinity11 are prevalent with anonymous donation12 since there is no monitoring of the number of live births per donor. [...] the number of children born from sperm donation has doubled in recent years.30 Although sperm may be donated by a relative or close friend of the couple or individual, often the sperm is donated anonymously through a sperm bank or clinic.


Gender And The Value Of Bodily Goods: Commodification In Egg And Sperm Donation, Rene Almeling Jul 2009

Gender And The Value Of Bodily Goods: Commodification In Egg And Sperm Donation, Rene Almeling

Law and Contemporary Problems

Listing a child for sale in the local paper's classified section is unthinkable, and it is illegal for donors to sell organs in the US. Yet fertility programs routinely recruit young women and men to "donate" eggs and sperm in return for financial compensation. Payments to women vary substantially, both within particular agencies and in different regions of the US, but the national average is around $4,200. Here, Almeling constructs a theoretical framework analyzing the social process of assigning value to the human body. He further describes the historical emergence of the market in eggs and sperm before ...


Sunny Samaritans And Egomaniacs: Price-Fixing In The Gamete Market, Kimberly D. Krawiec Jul 2009

Sunny Samaritans And Egomaniacs: Price-Fixing In The Gamete Market, Kimberly D. Krawiec

Law and Contemporary Problems

Krawiec compares the egg market to sperm market to illustrate the extent to which public-interest rhetoric enables private wealth transfers in the egg market. She also illuminates why such rhetoric is so effective, playing on deeply held societal norms. In addition, she provides an overview of the oocyte business, highlighting issues relating to recruitment, compensation, controversy, retrieval, and risk. She does the same for the sperm business. Furthermore, she discusses the anticompetitive behavior in the egg market and argues that the horizontal price-fixing embodied in the American Society for Reproductive Medicine's pricing guidelines violates the Sherman Act. Lastly, she ...


The Curing Law: On The Evolution Of Baby-Making Markets, Noa Ben-Asher Jan 2009

The Curing Law: On The Evolution Of Baby-Making Markets, Noa Ben-Asher

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The article offers a new paradigm to examine the legal regulation of reproductive technologies. The main argument is that a cure paradigm has shaped historical and current legal baby-making markets. Namely, reproductive technologies that have historically been understood as a cure for infertility (such as sperm donations and egg donations) have developed into market commodities, while others (such as full surrogacy) which have not been understood as a cure, have not. The article examines and critiques the cure paradigm. Specifically, the article challenges one current manifestation of the cure paradigm: the legal distinction between 'full surrogacy" (where a surrogate is ...


A Right To Choose?: Sex Selection In The International Context, Ashley Bumgarner May 2007

A Right To Choose?: Sex Selection In The International Context, Ashley Bumgarner

Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy

While there is some debate among doctors, ethicists, and the general public about the level of medical necessity that should justify a sex-selection procedure, most accept that sex selection for medical reasons is beyond ethical reproach, and in some situations, should even be encouraged.9 However, elective, non-medical sex-selection, which is often performed for social or financial reasons, is the subject greater scrutiny and impassioned ethical debate.10 Currently, doctors and geneticists are able to diagnose more than five hundred separate medical conditions in a developing fetus.11 Among these conditions are devastating genetic diseases such as hemophilia, Down syndrome ...


Accessing Reproductive Technologies: Invisible Barriers, Indelible Harms, Judith F. Daar Feb 2007

Accessing Reproductive Technologies: Invisible Barriers, Indelible Harms, Judith F. Daar

ExpressO

The use and success of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) over the past decade has contributed perceptibly to family formation nationwide. Today, 3 of every 100 children born owe their existence to some form of assisted conception. Despite, or perhaps because of, its technical successes, a growing body of evidence suggests that barriers to ART are being constructed to prevent procreation among select populations. The article’s theme is one of harm, specifically the harm that befalls patients, physicians, offspring and society when fertility treatments are denied on the basis of personal characteristics, including race, marital status and sexual orientation. While ...


Choice, Conscience, And Context, Mary Crossley Jan 1996

Choice, Conscience, And Context, Mary Crossley

Articles

Building on Professor Michael H. Shapiro's critique of arguments that some uses of new reproductive technologies devalue and use persons inappropriately (which is part of a Symposium on New Reproductive Technologies), this work considers two specific practices that increasingly are becoming part of the new reproductive landscape: selective reduction of multiple pregnancy and prenatal genetic testing to enable selective abortion. Professor Shapiro does not directly address either practice, but each may raise troubling questions that sound suspiciously like the arguments that Professor Shapiro sought to discredit. The concerns that selective reduction and prenatal genetic screening raise, however, relate not ...


Is Care Enough? Proceed With Care: Final Report Of The Royal Commission On New Reproductive Technologies, Diana Majury Apr 1994

Is Care Enough? Proceed With Care: Final Report Of The Royal Commission On New Reproductive Technologies, Diana Majury

Dalhousie Law Journal

Having just finished reading Proceed with Care: Final Report of the Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies, I find that the questions I am left with pertain less to the technologies themselves, although I certainly do have those, and more to the role and effectiveness of royal commissions generally, and this Royal Commission specifically. I am left wondering, Was it worth it? What really was the point of it all? How could we expect any group of seven-or was it nine? well, ultimately five people-to respond with depth and substance to a mandate that required them to "inquire into and ...