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Michigan Law Review

First Amendment

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Revenue Bonds And Religious Education: The Constitutionality Of Conduit Financing Involving Pervasively Sectarian Institutions, Trent Collier Mar 2002

Revenue Bonds And Religious Education: The Constitutionality Of Conduit Financing Involving Pervasively Sectarian Institutions, Trent Collier

Michigan Law Review

The Establishment Clause - and particularly the issue of government funding of religious education - is one of the murkiest areas of Supreme Court jurisprudence. The Supreme Court has acknowledged as much, and the sharp divide in the Court's most recent forays into Establishment Clause territory illustrates the point that the current jurisprudential standards allow for a broad range of interpretation. There is some hope that the Supreme court will provide further clarification of its Establishment Clause standard in the near future. For now, however, it appears that the dominant mode of the Establishment Clause analysis is the examination of …


The Warren Court: Religious Liberty And Church-State Relations, Paul G. Kauper Dec 1968

The Warren Court: Religious Liberty And Church-State Relations, Paul G. Kauper

Michigan Law Review

The purpose of this Article is to analyze the holdings of the Warren Court under these two clauses in an attempt to assess their significance by reference both to earlier interpretations and to the direction they may give to future development.


Constitutional Law - Separation Of Church And State - Bible Reading In The Public Schools, Frederic F. Brace Jr. Mar 1957

Constitutional Law - Separation Of Church And State - Bible Reading In The Public Schools, Frederic F. Brace Jr.

Michigan Law Review

The plaintiff, as a citizen, taxpayer, and parent of school children, sought an injunction to restrain the defendant school board from allowing school teachers to read the Bible aloud to students as required by a Tennessee statute. The plaintiff contended that this practice was offensive to him and in violation of the Tennessee and United States Constitutions. The trial court sustained defendant's demurrer. On appeal, held, affirmed. The statute violates neither constitution because it is not an interference with students' or parents' religious beliefs. Carden v. Bland, (Tenn. 1956) 288 S. W. (2d) 718.