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Full-Text Articles in Law

Consumer Law’S Equity Gap, Vijay Raghavan Aug 2022

Consumer Law’S Equity Gap, Vijay Raghavan

Utah Law Review

This Article is about the views that shape and constrain the development of consumer law. Consider the market for short-term, highcost loans. Policymakers tend to justify intervening in these markets on inefficiency grounds (consumers exhibit present bias) and rarely on equitable grounds (these loans cost too much). Why? One recent explanation suggests that policymakers may focus on inefficiency because they believe access to credit is essential for social and economic development. In this Article, I offer an alternative explanation. The lack of equity in consumer law is not just a function of narrow conceptions internal to consumer law but the …


Grounding Land Reform: Toward A Market-Compatible Approach To Land Reform, Shelley Cavalieri Nov 2015

Grounding Land Reform: Toward A Market-Compatible Approach To Land Reform, Shelley Cavalieri

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

This Article begins the project of constructing a unified account of land reform. This model consists of two central aspects. First, it articulates a set of goals, both practical and expressive, that redistributive land reform efforts can forward. Second, it offers a pragmatic theory of land reform, one that simultaneously achieves the progressive, poverty-eradication goals of land reform proponents and satisfies neoliberal demand for stable land markets. In this regard, the project offers a fresh way of thinking of the intractable conflict in land reform policy: how to redistribute land without destabilizing the nation. In addressing this problem, the …


Look Away Dixieland: The South And The Federal Income Tax, Robin L. Einhorn Jan 2015

Look Away Dixieland: The South And The Federal Income Tax, Robin L. Einhorn

Northwestern University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Normative Underpinnings Of Taxation, Sagit Leviner Oct 2012

The Normative Underpinnings Of Taxation, Sagit Leviner

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Who's Afraid Of Redistribution - An Analysis Of The Earned Income Tax Credit, Jennifer Bird-Pollan Apr 2009

Who's Afraid Of Redistribution - An Analysis Of The Earned Income Tax Credit, Jennifer Bird-Pollan

Missouri Law Review

One central element of the American version of redistribution comes in the form of the Earned Income Tax Credit (the "EITC"). In his campaign platform, Barack Obama vowed to expand the EITC, making it available to more taxpayers than ever before. Given the outcome of the 2008 election, and President Obama's seeming commitment to the tenets of redistribution (despite his disavowal of the word) and his express promise to expand the reach of the EITC, as well as the recent changes to the EITC introduced by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the "ARRA"), it seems a perfect …


South Africa's Land Reform Programme., Andre J. Groenewald Mar 2003

South Africa's Land Reform Programme., Andre J. Groenewald

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

South Africa is committed to land reform.  Because land is what shapes our national identity, the land dispossession of black people by the hand of white colonizers shapes the importance of land reform in South Africa. After the Natives’ Land Act of 1913, rights to own, rent, or even sharecrop land in South Africa depended upon a person’s racial classification. This was furthered by the Native Trust and Land Act of 1936. In 1994, however, the new government passed a Land Restitution Act. The land reform policy, Reconstruction and Development Programme, aimed to redress the injustices of apartheid, foster national …


Caste, Class, And Equal Citizenship, William E. Forbath Jan 1999

Caste, Class, And Equal Citizenship, William E. Forbath

Michigan Law Review

There is a familiar egalitarian constitutional tradition and another we have largely forgotten. The familiar one springs from Brown v. Board of Education; its roots lie in the Reconstruction era. Court-centered and countermajoritarian, it takes aim at caste and racial subordination. The forgotten one also originated with Reconstruction, but it was a majoritarian tradition, addressing its arguments to lawmakers and citizens, not to courts. Aimed against harsh class inequalities, it centered on decent work and livelihoods, social provision, and a measure of economic independence and democracy. Borrowing a phrase from its Progressive Era proponents, I will call it the social …


Lochner In Cyberspace: The New Economic Orthodoxy Of "Rights Management", Julie E. Cohen Nov 1998

Lochner In Cyberspace: The New Economic Orthodoxy Of "Rights Management", Julie E. Cohen

Michigan Law Review

Ninety-three years ago, in Lochner v. New York, the Supreme Court struck down a maximum-working-hours law for bakers as an impermissible invasion of employer-employee liberty of contract and, by implication, of the employer's property rights in his business. Lochner came to symbolize, and was vilified for, a vision of state power as rigidly circumscribed by the operation of judicially-determined laws of social ordering. By the late 1930s, the Court had changed course and accepted that the states' police power - or, in the case of Congress, the commerce power - encompassed even protective regulation of the parameters of the private …


The Elusive Quest For Global Justice, Edward B. Foley Jan 1997

The Elusive Quest For Global Justice, Edward B. Foley

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Zero-Sum Madison, Thomas W. Merrill May 1992

Zero-Sum Madison, Thomas W. Merrill

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Private Property and the Limits of American Constitutionalism by Jennifer Nedelsky


Criminal Redistribution Of Stolen Property: The Need For Law Reform, G. Robert Blakey, Michael Goldsmith Aug 1976

Criminal Redistribution Of Stolen Property: The Need For Law Reform, G. Robert Blakey, Michael Goldsmith

Michigan Law Review

Section I of this article describes various theft and fencing operations. As will be evident from that discussion, the most sophisticated fences are far removed from those receivers who are owners of seedy pawnshops or who indiscriminately select potential customers on the street, and thus they pose peculiar problems for law enforcement. Section II then identifies inadequacies in existing investigative techniques and in the substantive laws of receiving in light of modern theft and fencing operations. It proposes changes in the law and suggests appropriate law enforcement strategies to facilitate the detection and conviction of alleged fences. Needed changes in …


A Pilgrimage: Reflections On A Career In Administrative Law, Louis L. Jaffee Jan 1970

A Pilgrimage: Reflections On A Career In Administrative Law, Louis L. Jaffee

Indiana Law Journal

Adapted from a speech delivered at the annual banquet of the INDIANA LAW JOURNAL, April 25, 1969.


Latin-American Land Reform: The Uses Of Confiscation, Kenneth L. Karst Dec 1964

Latin-American Land Reform: The Uses Of Confiscation, Kenneth L. Karst

Michigan Law Review

This article examines the legislative techniques for taking land, showing their confiscatory operation. For many lawyers, the analysis would then be easily completed: confiscation is wrongful and must be condemned. Rejecting the implicit absolutism of that conclusion, this article inquires into the justifications that can be pleaded on behalf of selective confiscation as an aid in solving some of Latin America's economic and social ills.