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Full-Text Articles in Law

A Partial History Of Umkc School Of Law: The 'Minority Report', Robert C. Downs, Harry D. Pener, Steven D. Gilley Jul 2000

A Partial History Of Umkc School Of Law: The 'Minority Report', Robert C. Downs, Harry D. Pener, Steven D. Gilley

Faculty Works

In the modern era efforts at recruitment, selection, admission and retention of minorities to law school, while not always consistent, began and now continue to emphasize not only the manner in which a truly diverse student body enhances and enriches the learning experience of all students, but also the need to remedy the inequities and indignities visited by past discrimination. Any perspective on this law school's experience in minority recruitment, admissions and retention, necessitates at least an acknowledgment of the historical context in which the law school began and the social-political climate in which it developed. The announcement of the …


Race And The Right To Vote After Rice V. Cayetano, Ellen D. Katz Jan 2000

Race And The Right To Vote After Rice V. Cayetano, Ellen D. Katz

Articles

Last Term, the Supreme Court relied on Gomillion [v. Lightfoot] to hold that Hawaii, like Alabama before it, had segregated voters by race in violation of the Fifteenth Amendment. The state law at issue in Rice v. Cayetano provided that only "Hawaiians" could vote for the trustees of the state's Office of Hawaiian Affairs ("OHA"), a public agency that oversees programs designed to benefit the State's native people. Rice holds that restricting the OHA electorate to descendants of the 1778 inhabitants of the Hawaiian Islands embodied a racial classification that effectively "fenc[ed] out whole classes of ...ci tizens from decisionmaking …


Now You See It, Now You Don't: Why Do Real Estate Agents Withhold Available Houses From Black Customers?, Jan Ondrich, John Yinger, Stephen Ross Jan 2000

Now You See It, Now You Don't: Why Do Real Estate Agents Withhold Available Houses From Black Customers?, Jan Ondrich, John Yinger, Stephen Ross

Center for Policy Research

This paper develops a new approach to testing hypotheses about the causes of discrimination in housing sales. We follow previous research by using data from fair housing audits, a matched-pair technique for comparing the treatment of equally qualified black and white home buyers. Our contribution is to shift the focus from differences in the treatment of teammates during an audit to agent decisions concerning an individual housing unit. Our sample consists of all units seen by either a black of a white auditor in the 1989 national Housing Discrimination Study. We estimate a multinomial logit model to explain a real …


An Essay On Texas V. Lesage, Christina B. Whitman Jan 2000

An Essay On Texas V. Lesage, Christina B. Whitman

Articles

When I was invited to participate in this symposium, I was asked to discuss whether the causation defense developed in Mt. Healthy City School District Board of Education v. Doyle applied to cases challenging state action under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. As I argue below, it seems clear that Mt. Healthy does apply to equal protection cases. The Supreme Court explicitly so held last November in Texas v. Lesage. But the implications of Lesage go beyond questions of causation. The opinion suggests that the Court may be rethinking (or ignoring) its promise in Carey v. Piphus …


Still Unfair, Still Arbitrary - But Do We Care?, Samuel R. Gross Jan 2000

Still Unfair, Still Arbitrary - But Do We Care?, Samuel R. Gross

Other Publications

Welcome. It is a pleasure to see everybody at this bright and cheery hour of the morning. My assignment is to try to give an overview of the status of the death penalty in America at the beginning of the twenty-first century. I will try to put that in the context of how the death penalty was viewed thirty years ago, or more, and maybe that will tell us something about how the death penalty will be viewed thirty or forty years from now.