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Punishment

Journal

University of Missouri School of Law

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

Does The Punishment Fit The Crime?: A Comparative Note On Sentencing Laws For Murder In England And Wales Vs. The United States Of America, Megan Elizabeth Tongue Nov 2015

Does The Punishment Fit The Crime?: A Comparative Note On Sentencing Laws For Murder In England And Wales Vs. The United States Of America, Megan Elizabeth Tongue

Missouri Law Review

This Note explores the differences between the American legal system’s sentencing procedures for murder with the procedures of England and Wales. This Note attempts to determine how this divide occurred and whether the two countries chose the appropriate way to sentence their murderers. In particular, this Note focuses on England’s and Wales’s lack of degrees of murder and the United States’ practice of plea bargaining. Part II discusses the history of American and English criminal law and how these countries similarly evolved from their origins to the late nineteenth century. Part III explores modern criminal law theory progressing from the …


Supreme Court Decision On Juvenile Sentencing Results In Cruel And Unusual Difficulties For Missouri, Andrew Peebles Nov 2014

Supreme Court Decision On Juvenile Sentencing Results In Cruel And Unusual Difficulties For Missouri, Andrew Peebles

Missouri Law Review

Part II gives a brief background of the facts and circumstances surrounding the Hart decision. Part III discusses the history of the Eighth Amendment and explores the U.S. Supreme Court’s trend toward leniency in the imposition of punishments, culminating with a discussion of the Miller decision. Part IV delves into the Supreme Court of Missouri’s reasoning behind its decision in Hart and the temporary sentencing procedures the court provided. Finally, Part V comments on the many problems currently facing Missouri’s criminal justice system since the implementation of the Miller decision and the actions that will be required by the legislature …


Seconds Anyone: Using The Missouri Svp Law To Punish After Time Served, Rachel Woodell Hill Nov 2009

Seconds Anyone: Using The Missouri Svp Law To Punish After Time Served, Rachel Woodell Hill

Missouri Law Review

In 2006, amendments to the Missouri SVP Law took effect, lowering the state's burden of proof and changing the status under which rehabilitated individuals were permitted to rejoin society. These seemingly minor changes had enormous consequences, causing the constitutionality of the entire Missouri SVP scheme to be called into question. In the recent case, In re Care and Treatment of Van Orden, the Missouri Supreme Court addressed these concerns and found the amended scheme constitutional. However, in doing so, Missouri's highest court has effectively transformed what was once a remedial measure into a punitive sanction, under the veil of the …


Victimhood, Jessie K. Liu Jan 2006

Victimhood, Jessie K. Liu

Missouri Law Review

Part I of this paper examines the theoretical tension between using the total harm caused by a convicted defendant to determine the proper punishment and limiting the categories of harm for which punishment can be imposed. This is the equivalent in the criminal context of the problem discussed in the classic tort case of Palsgraf v Long Island Railroad. How should a legal regime limit the universe of victims? Part II provides a brief overview of pre-Guidelines decisions defining the term "victim" for sentencing purposes, focusing in particular on constitutional decisions about victim participation. Although the Sentencing Guidelines have made …


Justifying Restorative Justice: A Theoretical Justification For The Use Of Restorative Justice Practices, Zvi D. Gabbay Jul 2005

Justifying Restorative Justice: A Theoretical Justification For The Use Of Restorative Justice Practices, Zvi D. Gabbay

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This paper analyzes the premises of the two main theories of punishment that influence sentencing policies in most Western countries-retributivism and utilitarianism-and compares them to the basic values that structure the restorative justice theory. It then makes clear distinctions between restorative justice and the rehabilitative ideal and addresses the criticism that, like rehabilitation, restorative justice results in different punishments to equally culpable offenders. The paper concludes that restorative justice does not contradict retribution and utility as theoretical justifications for penal sanctioning. Moreover, it suggests that restorative practices rehabilitate the basic notions of retribution and deterrence that have been neglected in …


Michigan's Binding Summary Jury Trial: Reward Or Punishment - Farleigh V. Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 1251, Thomas G. Glick Jan 1994

Michigan's Binding Summary Jury Trial: Reward Or Punishment - Farleigh V. Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 1251, Thomas G. Glick

Journal of Dispute Resolution

In 1988, the Michigan Supreme Court added the summary jury trial to its arsenal of settlement devices available to trial judges.' Unfortunately, the summary jury trial employed in Farleigh v. Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 1251 failed to meet its goal, and no settlement was reached by the parties.6 Nevertheless, the Michigan Court of Appeals chose to enforce the summary jury verdict,7 thereby drawing into question not only the ability of the summary jury trial to meet the preliminary goal of promoting settlement, but also the larger goal of the accomplishment of justice