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Full-Text Articles in Law

Rehnquist And Federalism: An Empirical Perspective, Ruth Colker, Kevin Scott May 2005

Rehnquist And Federalism: An Empirical Perspective, Ruth Colker, Kevin Scott

The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law Working Paper Series

We attempt to articulate a vision of federalism, particularly the Rehnquist version of federalism. We find that there is little consistent thought on the role of the judiciary in protecting federalism. This lack of consensus makes it difficult to predict the decisions federalists might make, but we attempt to outline Chief Justice Rehnquist's contributions to understanding the role courts should play in protecting federalism. We then attempt to assess if Rehnquist adheres to his own vision of federalism. Using his votes since his elevation to Chief Justice in 1986, we test several hypotheses designed to determine if Chief Justice Rehnquist …


Straw Polls, Daniel B. Rodriguez Jan 2002

Straw Polls, Daniel B. Rodriguez

University of San Diego Public Law and Legal Theory Research Paper Series

A key measure of the democratic quality of a political community is how its members vote. The design and implementation of voting arrangements can illuminate the nature, purposes, and even potential of a community of citizens. Voting is, at the very least, used to sort out and implement preferences. Voting processes help in sorting out winners from losers and thereby provide a presumptively fair method for the implementation of public policy. At the same time, voting in a democratic policy is a coercive act. Voters are not merely expressing preferences; they are acting in order to transform their preferences into …


Personal Liability Of State Officials Under State And Federal Law, Charles R. Mcmanis Jul 1975

Personal Liability Of State Officials Under State And Federal Law, Charles R. Mcmanis

Scholarly Works

The common law rule of governmental immunity made governments immune from suit and held public officials personally liable for the torts they committed in the performance of their duties. In recent years, however, the law of tort liability has moved toward the increased immunity of governmental officials and employees and the increased liability of governmental units. In this Article Professor McManis first outlines the notion of sovereign immunity, following with an analysis of the nature and the scope of the immunity afforded governmental official sunder federal and state law, with a particular emphasis on the law of Georgia. The author …