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Problem-solving courts

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Articles 1 - 30 of 32

Full-Text Articles in Law

Mandatory, Fast, And Fair: Case Outcomes And Procedural Justice In A Family Drug Court, Melanie Fessinger, Katherine Hazen, Jamie Bahm, Jennie Cole-Mossman, Roger Heideman, Eve Brank Jan 2020

Mandatory, Fast, And Fair: Case Outcomes And Procedural Justice In A Family Drug Court, Melanie Fessinger, Katherine Hazen, Jamie Bahm, Jennie Cole-Mossman, Roger Heideman, Eve Brank

Faculty Publications of the Center on Children, Families, and the Law

Objectives: Problem-solving courts are traditionally voluntary in nature to promote procedural justice and to advance therapeutic jurisprudence. The Family Treatment Drug Court (FTDC) in Lancaster County, Nebraska, is a mandatory dependency court for families with allegations of child abuse or neglect related to substance use. We conducted a program evaluation examining parents’ case outcomes and perceptions of procedural justice to examine whether a mandatory problem-solving court could replicate the positive outcomes of problem-solving courts. Methods: We employed a quasi-experimental design that compared FTDC parents to traditional dependency court parents (control parents). We examined court records to gather court orders, compliance ...


Arrests As Guilt, Anna Roberts Jan 2019

Arrests As Guilt, Anna Roberts

Faculty Scholarship

An arrest puts a halt to one’s free life and may act as prelude to a new process. That new process—prosecution—may culminate in a finding of guilt. But arrest and guilt—concepts that are factually and legally distinct—frequently seem to be fused together. This fusion appears in many of the consequences of arrest, including the use of arrest in assessing “risk,” in calculating “recidivism,” and in identifying “offenders.” An examination of this fusion elucidates obstacles to key aspects of criminal justice reform. Efforts at reform, whether focused on prosecution or defense, police or bail, require a ...


Mental Health Courts And Sentencing Disparities, E. Lea Johnston, Conor P. Flynn Jan 2017

Mental Health Courts And Sentencing Disparities, E. Lea Johnston, Conor P. Flynn

UF Law Faculty Publications

Despite the proliferation of mental health courts across the United States, virtually no attention has been paid to the criminal justice effects these courts carry for participants. This article provides the first empirical analysis of differential sentencing practices in mental health and traditional criminal courts. Using a case study approach, the article compares how Pennsylvania’s Erie County Mental Health Court and county criminal courts sentenced individuals who committed the same offenses and held the same average criminal history score. Information on the mental health court—including eligibility criteria, plea bargaining and sentencing procedure, sentencing policies, program length, graduation rates ...


Status Courts, Erin R. Collins Jan 2017

Status Courts, Erin R. Collins

Law Faculty Publications

This Article identifies and analyzes a new type of specialized "problemsolving" court: status courts. Status courts are criminal or quasicriminal courts dedicated to defendants who are members of particular status groups, such as veterans or girls. They differ from other problemsolving courts, such as drug or domestic violence courts, in that nothing about the status court offender or the offense he or she committed presents a systemic "problem" to be "solved." In fact, status courts aim to honor the offender's experience and strengthen the offender's association with the characteristic used to sort him or her into court.

This ...


People With Secrets: Contesting, Constructing, And Resisting Women’S Claims About Sexualized Victimization, Rose Corrigan, Corey S. Shdaimah Jun 2016

People With Secrets: Contesting, Constructing, And Resisting Women’S Claims About Sexualized Victimization, Rose Corrigan, Corey S. Shdaimah

Catholic University Law Review

What do sexual assault victims and women charged with prostitution have in common? Both are processed through a criminal justice system where legal actors assess their claims of victimization and either provide or deny resources and recognition in response to those claims. Ideal victim theory posits that not all victims’ claims are treated equally due to static factors such as personal characteristics or case facts. Professor Corrigan and Professor Shdaimah present the Arena of Intelligibility, an original analytical tool developed from their empirical data, to more effectively explain case outcomes for women affected by sexual crimes.

The Arena explains criminal ...


Problem-Solving Courts: From Innovation To Institutionalization, Michael C. Dorf, Jeffrey A. Fagan Feb 2015

Problem-Solving Courts: From Innovation To Institutionalization, Michael C. Dorf, Jeffrey A. Fagan

Michael C. Dorf

No abstract provided.


Procedural Due Process In Modern Problem-Solving Courts: An Application Of The Asymmetric Immune Knowledge Hypothesis, Leah C. Georges May 2014

Procedural Due Process In Modern Problem-Solving Courts: An Application Of The Asymmetric Immune Knowledge Hypothesis, Leah C. Georges

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research: Department of Psychology

Problem-solving courts, such as drug and mental health courts, function under the model of therapeutic jurisprudence—the idea that legal policies and procedures should help and not harm clients, within the confines of the law (Winick & Wexler, 2002). Although it would seem that the lack of procedural due process in most problem-solving courts is in direct opposition to the best interests of a client, it is possible that observers find this more of a problem than do the court clients themselves. This two-experiment study applied Igou’s (2008) AIK hypothesis to problem-solving courts’ practice of sanctioning in the absence of due process. Specifically, it is possible that observers find problem-solving courts’ lack of procedural due process more of a problem than do the clients themselves because of differences in perspective and discordant knowledge of the coping strategies that problem-solving court clients utilize. This research sought to test these ideas. Experiment 1 manipulated the perspective from which participants considered a drug or mental health court sanction proceeding, with or without due process present. Experiment 1 also explored the moderating and mediating effects of participants’ coping knowledge and perceived similarity as it related to their anticipated affect and well-being as a result of the sanction. Experiment 2 manipulated coping directly to determine whether a discordant coping knowledge would explain the perspective effects identified in Experiment 1. Taken together, the findings of these experiments provided mixed support for traditional self-other effects in affective forecasting (Gilbert, Pinel, Wilson, Blumberg, & Wheatley, 1998; Hsee & Hastie, 2006; Igou, 2004; 2008; Van Boven & Lowenstein, 2003; Wiener, Gervais, Allen, & Marquez, 2013) and even less support for Igou’s asymmetric immune knowledge hypothesis (2008). However, several important, legally relevant findings provide an opportunity to inform future psycholegal research in the area of procedural fairness, due process, and the inherent differences between drug and mental health courts and their clients.

Adviser: Richard L. Wiener


Flawed Coalitions And The Politics Of Crime, David Jaros May 2014

Flawed Coalitions And The Politics Of Crime, David Jaros

All Faculty Scholarship

Bipartisanship can be dangerous. In the late 1970s, liberal and conservative forces united to discard two centuries of federal sentencing practice and usher in an era of fixed guidelines that would reshape the criminal justice landscape. In the decades that followed, liberals would come to bitterly regret their alliance with conservative sentencing reformers. The guideline regime established by the Sentencing Reform Act ultimately advanced hardline conservative criminal justice goals that were antithetical to the objectives of many of the Act’s former liberal supporters.

Researchers have shown that a particular cognitive bias — cultural cognition — can explain why intense partisan conflicts ...


The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts: Inside The Courts And Beyond, Stacy Lee Burns Dec 2013

The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts: Inside The Courts And Beyond, Stacy Lee Burns

Stacy Lee Burns

No abstract provided.


John Brown Went Off To War: Considering Veterans’ Courts As Problem-Solving Courts, Michael L. Perlin Jan 2013

John Brown Went Off To War: Considering Veterans’ Courts As Problem-Solving Courts, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

In this paper, I seek to contextualize veterans courts in light of the therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) movement, the turn to problem-solving courts of all sorts (especially focusing on mental health courts), and the societal ambivalence that we have shown to veterans in the four decades since the Vietnam war.

I argue that TJ’s focuses on how law actually impacts people’s lives, on the law’s influence on emotional life and psychological well-being and on the need for law to value psychological health and avoid the imposition of anti-therapeutic consequences whenever possible can serve as a template for a ...


The Judge, He Cast His Robe Aside: Mental Health Courts, Dignity And Due Process, Michael L. Perlin Jan 2013

The Judge, He Cast His Robe Aside: Mental Health Courts, Dignity And Due Process, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

One of the most important developments in the past two decades in the way that criminal defendants with mental disabilities are treated in the criminal process has been the creation and the expansion of mental health courts, one kind of “problem-solving court.” There are now over 300 such courts in operation in States, some dealing solely with misdemeanors, some solely with non-violent offenders, and some with no such restrictions. There is a wide range of dispositional alternatives available to judges in these cases, and an even wider range of judicial attitudes. And the entire concept of “mental health courts” is ...


Theorizing Mental Health Courts, Lea Johnston Feb 2011

Theorizing Mental Health Courts, Lea Johnston

E. Lea Johnston

To date, no scholarly article has analyzed the theoretical basis of mental health courts, which currently exist in forty-three states. This Article examines the two utilitarian justifications proposed by mental health court advocates—therapeutic jurisprudence and therapeutic rehabilitation—and finds both insufficient. Therapeutic jurisprudence is inadequate to justify mental health courts because of its inability, by definition, to resolve significant normative conflict. In essence, mental health courts express values fundamentally at odds with those underlying the traditional criminal justice system. Furthermore, the sufficiency of rehabilitation, as this concept appears to be defined by mental health court advocates, depends on the ...


The Future Of Problem-Solving Justice: An International Perspective, Greg Berman, Aubrey Fox Jan 2010

The Future Of Problem-Solving Justice: An International Perspective, Greg Berman, Aubrey Fox

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Community Voice And Justice: An Essay On Problem-Solving Courts As A Proxy For Change, Brenda Bratton Blom, Julie Galbo-Moyes, Robin Jacobs Jan 2010

Community Voice And Justice: An Essay On Problem-Solving Courts As A Proxy For Change, Brenda Bratton Blom, Julie Galbo-Moyes, Robin Jacobs

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts: Inside The Courts And Beyond, Stacy Lee Burns Jan 2010

The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts: Inside The Courts And Beyond, Stacy Lee Burns

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


A Conversation About Problem-Solving Courts: Take 2, Jane M. Spinak Jan 2010

A Conversation About Problem-Solving Courts: Take 2, Jane M. Spinak

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


A Conversation With The Experts: The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts Jan 2010

A Conversation With The Experts: The Future Of Problem-Solving Courts

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Taking A Stand In A Not-So-Perfect World: What’S A Critical Supporter Of Problem-Solving Courts To Do?, Corey Shdaimah Jan 2010

Taking A Stand In A Not-So-Perfect World: What’S A Critical Supporter Of Problem-Solving Courts To Do?, Corey Shdaimah

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Romancing The Court, Jane M. Spinak Jan 2008

Romancing The Court, Jane M. Spinak

Faculty Scholarship

Problem-solving courts, created at the end of the 20th century, make court-based solutions central to addressing significant societal problems, such as substance abuse and its impact on criminal activity and family functioning. Yet, lessons gleaned from over 100 years of family court history suggest that court-based solutions to intractable social problems have rarely been effective. This article asks three questions of the problem-solving court movement: What problem are we trying to solve? Is the court the best place to solve the problem? What are the consequences of giving authority to a court for solving the problem? Answering those questions through ...


Problem-Solving Courts: From Innovation To Institutionalization, Michael C. Dorf, Jeffrey A. Fagan Sep 2003

Problem-Solving Courts: From Innovation To Institutionalization, Michael C. Dorf, Jeffrey A. Fagan

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Specialized Courts: Not A Cure-All, Phylis Skloot Bamberger Jan 2003

Specialized Courts: Not A Cure-All, Phylis Skloot Bamberger

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article argues that while specialized courts, such as drug courts, dealing with defendants charged with crimes are of critical importance, sole or primary reliance on specialized courts are not sufficient. Instead, centralized resources should be available as necessary to all courts in a county or city in which alternatives to incarceration are possible, although not automatic because not all defendants are serviced by specialized court.


Just The (Unweildy, Hard To Gether, But Nonetheless Essential) Facts, Ma'am: What We Know And Don't Know About Problem-Solving Courts, Greg Berman, Anne Gulick Jan 2003

Just The (Unweildy, Hard To Gether, But Nonetheless Essential) Facts, Ma'am: What We Know And Don't Know About Problem-Solving Courts, Greg Berman, Anne Gulick

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article asses what is known and what remains to be understood about problem-solving courts. Specifically, the article asserts that drug courts serve a needy population, court mandated treatment programs have higher retention rates, those who participate longer have better outcomes, those in drug courts had lower rates of recidivism, drug use, and that graduated sanctions have statistically significant impact on offenders behavior, sanctions are crucial to the model's effectiveness, post-program studies are sparse, drug courts are less costly than traditional adjudication, but cost savings for jail and prison beds are less clear. The article also addresses questions that ...


Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Problem Solving Courts, Bruce J. Winick Jan 2003

Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Problem Solving Courts, Bruce J. Winick

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article offers a number of suggestions concerning how judges should act in problem solving court contexts to spark the motivation of the individual to achieve rehabilitation and increase compliance with treatment. The proposals are derived from psychological literature in other contexts but further analysis and empirical research is needed. The article finds that therapeutic jurisprudence can contribute to the functioning of problem solving courts which can refine therapeutic jurisprudence approaches.


Theorizing Community Justice Through Community Courts, Jeffrey Fagan, Victoria Malkin Jan 2003

Theorizing Community Justice Through Community Courts, Jeffrey Fagan, Victoria Malkin

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article reports on research conducted on the Red Hook Community Justice Center in Brooklyn, New York. It theorizes the structure and process of community justice, focusing on the model offered by community courts and examining how the Red Hook Community Justice Center's development and implementation are products of its immersion in the intersection of societal, spatial, and political dynamic within the Red Hook neighborhood. The article begins by reviewing the sociological perspectives that converge in the historical development of "community justice." It continues by setting forth a framework of social regulation and control that shapes the internal workings ...


Theorizing Community Justice Through Community Courts, Jeffrey Fagan, Victoria Malkin Jan 2003

Theorizing Community Justice Through Community Courts, Jeffrey Fagan, Victoria Malkin

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article reports on research conducted on the Red Hook Community Justice Center in Brooklyn, New York. It theorizes the structure and process of community justice, focusing on the model offered by community courts and examining how the Red Hook Community Justice Center's development and implementation are products of its immersion in the intersection of societal, spatial, and political dynamic within the Red Hook neighborhood. The article begins by reviewing the sociological perspectives that converge in the historical development of "community justice." It continues by setting forth a framework of social regulation and control that shapes the internal workings ...


Just The (Unweildy, Hard To Gether, But Nonetheless Essential) Facts, Ma'am: What We Know And Don't Know About Problem-Solving Courts, Greg Berman, Anne Gulick Jan 2003

Just The (Unweildy, Hard To Gether, But Nonetheless Essential) Facts, Ma'am: What We Know And Don't Know About Problem-Solving Courts, Greg Berman, Anne Gulick

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article asses what is known and what remains to be understood about problem-solving courts. Specifically, the article asserts that drug courts serve a needy population, court mandated treatment programs have higher retention rates, those who participate longer have better outcomes, those in drug courts had lower rates of recidivism, drug use, and that graduated sanctions have statistically significant impact on offenders behavior, sanctions are crucial to the model's effectiveness, post-program studies are sparse, drug courts are less costly than traditional adjudication, but cost savings for jail and prison beds are less clear. The article also addresses questions that ...


Due Process And Problem Solving Courts, Eric Lane Jan 2003

Due Process And Problem Solving Courts, Eric Lane

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article addresses the model of the problem-solving courts, beginning with the 1989 Dade County, Florida drug court and the role of the pro-active problem solving judge as presented by Judge Lederman of the Dade County drug court. The article reviews the role of the pro-active problem-solving judge in light of the defendants due process rights. After reviewing several case studies, transcripts, and literature on the issue, the article concludes that problem-solving judging and lawyering need not be in conflict with due process standards.


Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Problem Solving Courts, Bruce J. Winick Jan 2003

Therapeutic Jurisprudence And Problem Solving Courts, Bruce J. Winick

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article offers a number of suggestions concerning how judges should act in problem solving court contexts to spark the motivation of the individual to achieve rehabilitation and increase compliance with treatment. The proposals are derived from psychological literature in other contexts but further analysis and empirical research is needed. The article finds that therapeutic jurisprudence can contribute to the functioning of problem solving courts which can refine therapeutic jurisprudence approaches.


Specialized Courts: Not A Cure-All, Phylis Skloot Bamberger Jan 2003

Specialized Courts: Not A Cure-All, Phylis Skloot Bamberger

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article argues that while specialized courts, such as drug courts, dealing with defendants charged with crimes are of critical importance, sole or primary reliance on specialized courts are not sufficient. Instead, centralized resources should be available as necessary to all courts in a county or city in which alternatives to incarceration are possible, although not automatic because not all defendants are serviced by specialized court.


Due Process And Problem Solving Courts, Eric Lane Jan 2003

Due Process And Problem Solving Courts, Eric Lane

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article addresses the model of the problem-solving courts, beginning with the 1989 Dade County, Florida drug court and the role of the pro-active problem solving judge as presented by Judge Lederman of the Dade County drug court. The article reviews the role of the pro-active problem-solving judge in light of the defendants due process rights. After reviewing several case studies, transcripts, and literature on the issue, the article concludes that problem-solving judging and lawyering need not be in conflict with due process standards.