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2008

Vanderbilt University Law School

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Fair Use Doctrine And Trackjacking: Beautiful Animal Or Destroyer Of Worlds?, S. Wayne Clemons, Jr. Jan 2008

The Fair Use Doctrine And Trackjacking: Beautiful Animal Or Destroyer Of Worlds?, S. Wayne Clemons, Jr.

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

"Trackjacking" is the unauthorized replacement of the original soundtrack of an audiovisual recording, such as a movie or television show, with another that is designed to alter substantially the plot and/or characters of the original work. While trackjacking is a creative and entertaining form of art, it may also constitute copyright infringement if the original work is one that is copyrighted. However, if certain criteria are met, the "fair use" doctrine provides a mechanism for courts to excuse what otherwise would be considered copyright infringement. Because the unique nature of trackjacking allows the new work to be distributed in such …


Six Clicks Of Separation: The Legal Ramifications Of Employers Using Social Networking Sites To Research Applicants, Ian Byrnside Jan 2008

Six Clicks Of Separation: The Legal Ramifications Of Employers Using Social Networking Sites To Research Applicants, Ian Byrnside

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

As social networking sites like Facebook.com and MySpace.com continue to grow in popularity, college students and other job applicants voluntarily divulge an increasing amount of personal information on them, often unaware of the potential negative effects it may have on their search for employment. Employers are beginning to take note of this trend and are increasingly using applicants' social networking profiles to supplement traditional application information. Many applicants feel that employers should not base employment decisions on social networking profiles in any way and believe that it is illegal for employers to do so. Yet, it appears that employers that …