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Full-Text Articles in Law

"Carhart", Constitutional Rights, And The Psychology Of Regret, Chris Guthrie Jan 2008

"Carhart", Constitutional Rights, And The Psychology Of Regret, Chris Guthrie

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

In "Gonzales v. Carhart", the Supreme Court upheld the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act. In so doing, the Court used the prospect of regret to justify limiting choice. Relying on empirical evidence documenting the four ways in which regret actually operates, this Article argues that the Court's analysis reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of the psychology of regret. By exposing the Court's misunderstanding of this emotion, this article seeks to minimize the most significant risk posed by the Carhart decision: that states will use the prospect of regret to justify additional constraints not only on the abortion right but also on other …


Government Data Mining And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin Jan 2008

Government Data Mining And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

The government's ability to obtain and analyze recorded information about its citizens through the process known as data mining has expanded enormously over the past decade. Although the best-known government data mining operation (Total Information Awareness, more recently dubbed Terrorism Information Awareness) supposedly no longer exists, large-scale data mining by federal agencies devoted to enforcing criminal and counter-terrorism laws has continued unabated. This paper addresses three puzzles about data mining. First, when data mining is undertaken by the government, does it implicate the Fourth Amendment? Second, does the analysis change when data mining is undertaken by private entities which then …


Six Clicks Of Separation: The Legal Ramifications Of Employers Using Social Networking Sites To Research Applicants, Ian Byrnside Jan 2008

Six Clicks Of Separation: The Legal Ramifications Of Employers Using Social Networking Sites To Research Applicants, Ian Byrnside

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

As social networking sites like Facebook.com and MySpace.com continue to grow in popularity, college students and other job applicants voluntarily divulge an increasing amount of personal information on them, often unaware of the potential negative effects it may have on their search for employment. Employers are beginning to take note of this trend and are increasingly using applicants' social networking profiles to supplement traditional application information. Many applicants feel that employers should not base employment decisions on social networking profiles in any way and believe that it is illegal for employers to do so. Yet, it appears that employers that …


The Fair Use Doctrine And Trackjacking: Beautiful Animal Or Destroyer Of Worlds?, S. Wayne Clemons, Jr. Jan 2008

The Fair Use Doctrine And Trackjacking: Beautiful Animal Or Destroyer Of Worlds?, S. Wayne Clemons, Jr.

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

"Trackjacking" is the unauthorized replacement of the original soundtrack of an audiovisual recording, such as a movie or television show, with another that is designed to alter substantially the plot and/or characters of the original work. While trackjacking is a creative and entertaining form of art, it may also constitute copyright infringement if the original work is one that is copyrighted. However, if certain criteria are met, the "fair use" doctrine provides a mechanism for courts to excuse what otherwise would be considered copyright infringement. Because the unique nature of trackjacking allows the new work to be distributed in such …