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Pharmaceuticals

Michigan Law Review

Administrative Law

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Renovations Needed: The Fda's Floor/Ceiling Framework, Preemption, And The Opioid Epidemic, Michael R. Abrams Jan 2018

Renovations Needed: The Fda's Floor/Ceiling Framework, Preemption, And The Opioid Epidemic, Michael R. Abrams

Michigan Law Review

The FDA’s regulatory framework for pharmaceuticals uses a “floor/ceiling” model: administrative rules set a “floor” of minimum safety, while state tort liability sets a “ceiling” of maximum protection. This model emphasizes premarket scrutiny but largely relies on the state common law “ceiling” to police the postapproval drug market. As the Supreme Court increasingly holds state tort law preempted by federal administrative standards, the FDA’s framework becomes increasingly imbalanced. In the face of a historic prescription medication overdose crisis, the Opioid Epidemic, this imbalance allows the pharmaceutical industry to avoid internalizing the public health costs of their opioid products. This Note …


Regulating By Repute, David Zaring Apr 2012

Regulating By Repute, David Zaring

Michigan Law Review

Is regulation a hopeless cause? Many thoughtful observers spend a lot of time enumerating all of the reasons why it is doomed to fail. The entire field of public choice, with impeccable logic, posits the likely corruption of every bureaucrat. And if corruption cannot explain the failure of regulation, the atrophy that comes from lack of competition-there is just one government, after all, and it does not have a profit motive-may be just as rich a vein to mine. It could also be that the legal system itself, with its myriad complexities, checks, and procedural requirements, may ossify to the …


The Ftc's Injunctive Authority Against False Advertising Of Food And Drugs, Michigan Law Review Mar 1977

The Ftc's Injunctive Authority Against False Advertising Of Food And Drugs, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Two judicial decisions in the early 1950s construing the FTC's section 13 (a) power produced a conflict that has not been resolved either by later courts or by the amendments to section 13 enacted in 1973. The dispute basically concerns the depth of the courts' inquiry into whether an advertisement violates- section 12 and the applicability of traditional equitable concepts in the context of the statutory injunction procedure. This Note contends that the legislative history of pertinent provisions of the Act suggests an appropriate resolution of the conflict through a two-step approach that would relax the scrutiny ordinarily accorded petitions …