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Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections Of Race And Class For Women In Academia, Carmen G. Gonzalez Sep 2012

Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections Of Race And Class For Women In Academia, Carmen G. Gonzalez

Carmen G. Gonzalez

Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America. The downloadable document contains the Introduction …


Liberalism And Postliberalism In Bolivarian Venezuela, Tony Petros Spanakos Sep 2012

Liberalism And Postliberalism In Bolivarian Venezuela, Tony Petros Spanakos

Department of Political Science and Law Faculty Scholarship and Creative Works

In the last half-decade, the “rise of the left” in Latin America has been studied extensively by many scholars. Whether framed as one, two, or many lefts, its various party leaders have been vocal in opposition to neoliberalism, although the orientation of their policies and governments toward neoliberalism has been mixed (Panizza 2009). The most influential and visible case of an anti-neoliberal government is that of Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez Frías.

The five books reviewed here, drawing on research on Venezuela, share a common scholarly interest in liberalism, pluralism, and account- ability, although some defend liberalism (Brewer-Carías, Corrales and Penfold), …


Moral Markets And The Problematic Proprietor: How Neoliberal Values Shape Lottery Debates In Nevada, Christopher Wetzel Aug 2012

Moral Markets And The Problematic Proprietor: How Neoliberal Values Shape Lottery Debates In Nevada, Christopher Wetzel

Occasional Papers

All but seven states have legalized lotteries since New Hampshire ushered in the modern lottery era in 1964. Although casino gaming has been permitted since 1931, Nevada has rejected multiple legislative proposals amend the State Constitution and create a state-run lottery. This paper theorizes the lottery’s absence in Nevada, focusing in particular on the role of the state. Lotteries are distinct from other forms of gaming because states act simultaneously as the operation’s regulator and proprietor. In this case, Nevada’s lottery legalization debates over the last half century reflect the profound moral valence of markets. The state as a potential …


Debtor’S Prison In The Neoliberal State: “Debtfare” And The Cultural Logics Of The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention And Consumer Protection Act Of 2005, Linda E. Coco Apr 2012

Debtor’S Prison In The Neoliberal State: “Debtfare” And The Cultural Logics Of The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention And Consumer Protection Act Of 2005, Linda E. Coco

Linda E. Coco

The enactment of the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”) of 2005, amending the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, marks a transformation in bankruptcy law and policy that is representative of larger shifts in dominant economic and political models from “embedded liberalism” to free market “neoliberalism.” BAPCPA’s provisions are part of the new practices of the emergent neoliberal state as they relate to the American middle class segment of the population. In disciplining the middle class, BAPCPA shifts the risk and the responsibility of the lending relationship onto consumer debtors. BAPCPA does this by keeping financially distressed individuals …


Debtor’S Prison In The Neoliberal State: “Debtfare” And The Cultural Logics Of The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention And Consumer Protection Act Of 2005, Linda E. Coco Apr 2012

Debtor’S Prison In The Neoliberal State: “Debtfare” And The Cultural Logics Of The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention And Consumer Protection Act Of 2005, Linda E. Coco

Linda E. Coco

The enactment of the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”) of 2005, amending the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, marks a transformation in bankruptcy law and policy that is representative of larger shifts in dominant economic and political models from “embedded liberalism” to free market “neoliberalism.” BAPCPA’s provisions are part of the new practices of the emergent neoliberal state as they relate to the American middle class segment of the population. In disciplining the middle class, BAPCPA shifts the risk and the responsibility of the lending relationship onto consumer debtors. BAPCPA does this by keeping financially distressed individuals …


Feminism In The Global Political Economy: Contradiction And Consensus In Cuba, Deborah M. Weissman Jan 2012

Feminism In The Global Political Economy: Contradiction And Consensus In Cuba, Deborah M. Weissman

Deborah M. Weissman

Much has been written about transnational feminist networks and their impacts on the local condition of women. Transborder feminist organizing has reshaped discourses and practice from the local to the international. Global feminist endeavors have influenced the development of international legal standards affecting the circumstances of women and contributed to the gender mainstreaming of human rights initiatives. At the same time, feminist transnationalism has often been identified as the source of tension as efforts have at times resulted in support for a neoliberal agenda propounding empowerment and self-esteem issues, which in turn, has raised questions about who is defining the …


How The "Unintended Consequences" Story Promotes Unjust Intent And Impact., Martha T. Mccluskey Jan 2012

How The "Unintended Consequences" Story Promotes Unjust Intent And Impact., Martha T. Mccluskey

Journal Articles

In the guise of critical analysis of the limits of law reform, the familiar phrase “unintended consequences” serves to rationalize rising inequality and to undermine democratic accountability. This paper examines how the phrase promotes a story of disentitlement, using the recent financial crisis as an example. By naturalizing inequality as power beyond law’s reach, this phrase’s message that benign law is likely to bring unequal consequences dovetails with a seemingly contradictory message that benign intent, rather than harmful impact, is what primarily counts for evaluating inequality.

As part of a LatCrit XV symposium taking a “bottom-up” view of the recent …


Economic Development And The Problem With The Problem-Solving Approach, Justin Desautels-Stein Jan 2012

Economic Development And The Problem With The Problem-Solving Approach, Justin Desautels-Stein

Publications

Scholars and practitioners alike have recently pointed to the idea of a "new moment" in the field of law and economic development, as well as a hope for a fruitful rethinking of political economy. The idea is that we have passed out of the period of high "neoliberalism," associated at one time with Reagan, Thatcher, and the so-called Washington Consensus and now eclipsed by the ascendance of the Obama Administration. The hope attending the new consensus is that, in the wake of neoliberal law and policy, the field of law and development might be on the verge of a new …


Overcoming Neoliberal Hegemony In Community Development: Law, Planning, And Selected Lamarckism, Jerrold A. Long Jan 2012

Overcoming Neoliberal Hegemony In Community Development: Law, Planning, And Selected Lamarckism, Jerrold A. Long

Articles

No abstract provided.


Fantasies And Illusions: On Liberty, Order, And Free Market, Bernard E. Harcourt Jan 2012

Fantasies And Illusions: On Liberty, Order, And Free Market, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Critical thinkers have used various terms to describe the collective imaginary that has real effects on individuals, society, and politics. Freud used the term “einer Illusion” to characterize religious belief in his work, The Future of an Illusion, though many others in the psychoanalytic tradition would turn to the notion of fantasy. Marx sometimes used the term illusion and he notoriously deployed the optical illusion and the phantasmagoria in his famous discussion of commodity fetishism. (And Marx, of course, is the father of Ideologiekritic). Foucault at times used the language of fantasy and phantasms, in an early period deployed the …


"Becker On Ewald On Foucault On Becker": American Neoliberalism And Michel Foucault's 1979 Birth Of Biopolitics Lectures, Gary S. Becker, Francois Ewald, Bernard E. Harcourt Jan 2012

"Becker On Ewald On Foucault On Becker": American Neoliberalism And Michel Foucault's 1979 Birth Of Biopolitics Lectures, Gary S. Becker, Francois Ewald, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

In a series of lectures delivered in 1979 at the Collège de France under the title The Birth of Biopolitics, Michel Foucault conducted a close reading of Gary Becker’s writings on human capital and on crime and punishment, within the context of an elaboration and critique of American neoliberalism. Foucault was assisted at the time, at the Collège de France, by François Ewald. Since then, there has been ongoing debate over Foucault’s views about neoliberalism. In this historic meeting at the University of Chicago between Professors Becker and Ewald, Professor Ewald presents a framework to understand Foucault’s writings on Becker; …


On The American Paradox Of Laissez Faire And Mass Incarceration, Bernard E. Harcourt Jan 2012

On The American Paradox Of Laissez Faire And Mass Incarceration, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

In The Illusion of Free Markets (Harvard 2011), Professor Bernard Harcourt analyzes the evolution of a distinctly American paradox: in the country that has done the most to promote the idea of a hands-off government, we run the single largest prison complex in the entire world. Harcourt traces this paradox back to the eighteenth century and demonstrates how the presumption of government incompetence in economic affairs has been coupled with that of government legitimacy in the realm of policing and punishing. Harcourt shows how these linked presumptions have fueled the expansion of the carceral sphere in the nineteenth and twentieth …


Rotten Social Background And The Temper Of The Times, Angela P. Harris Dec 2011

Rotten Social Background And The Temper Of The Times, Angela P. Harris

Angela P Harris

This essay was submitted to the Alabama Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Law review as part of a symposium on Richard Delgado's essay on "Rotten Social Background." Its publication has been delayed by the destruction caused by the Tuscaloosa/Birmingham tornado in the spring of 2011.


Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections Of Race And Class For Women In Academia -- Introduction, Carmen G. Gonzalez, Angela P. Harris Dec 2011

Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections Of Race And Class For Women In Academia -- Introduction, Carmen G. Gonzalez, Angela P. Harris

Carmen G. Gonzalez

Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. One of the topics addressed is the importance of forging supportive networks to transform the workplace and create a more hospitable environment for traditionally subordinated groups. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and …


Inscripción Automática Y Voto Voluntario, Pablo Marshall Dec 2011

Inscripción Automática Y Voto Voluntario, Pablo Marshall

Pablo Marshall

Este trabajo analiza las implicancias legales y políticas de la reforma del sistema de votación. La primera parte, jurídica, expone los cambios que se siguen de la transformación del voto obligatorio en voluntario y de la inscripción voluntaria en automática, observando algunos problemas que deberán ser abordados en el futuro. La segunda parte, política, presenta una tesis interpretativa de la reforma que sugiere que ella es un avance de la lógica liberal sobre la lógica democrática en nuestra Constitución y, sobre todo, del proyecto político neoliberal, cuyo objetivo es la completa despolitización de nuestra comunidad.