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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Suburban Sprawl: Not Just An Environmental Issue, Michael E Lewyn Dec 2000

Suburban Sprawl: Not Just An Environmental Issue, Michael E Lewyn

Michael E Lewyn

Explains why conservatives should be concerned about suburban sprawl, and how market-oriented solutions can mitigate sprawl.


Deportation And Justice: A Constitutional Dialogue, Daniel Kanstroom Jul 2000

Deportation And Justice: A Constitutional Dialogue, Daniel Kanstroom

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Recent statutory changes to the United States immigration law have resulted in a large increase in the number of lawful permanent resident noncitizens who are deported because of prior criminal conduct. Now, deportation is often a virtually automatic consequence of conviction for an increasingly minor array of crimes including possessory drug offenses and shoplifting. Under current statutory law, permanent resident noncitizens may be deported for crimes that were not grounds for deportation when they were committed and there may be no possibiilty of mercy or humanitarian relief. This Dialogue explores arguments for and against this system. Specifically, it examines the ...


Putting Watergate Behind Us: Salinas, Sun-Diamond, And Two Views Of The Anticorruption Model, George D. Brown Feb 2000

Putting Watergate Behind Us: Salinas, Sun-Diamond, And Two Views Of The Anticorruption Model, George D. Brown

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

A central question in the ongoing debate over the future of the American political system is how to deal with public corruption. This Article first examines the dominant theme of the last thirty years: a relatively hard-line approach that Professor Brown refers to as the post-watergate concensus. In recent years, however, this approach has been subject to growing criminalization of government ethics; Professor Brown then turns to what can be viewed as the counterrevolutionary critique. Against this background, he considers the United States Supreme Court's contribution to the debate. Starting with the recent Sun-Diamond and Salinas cases, and drawing ...


Homosexuality As Contagion: From The Well Of Loneliness To The Boy Scouts, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2000

Homosexuality As Contagion: From The Well Of Loneliness To The Boy Scouts, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

In the political arena, there are currently two central and competing views of homosexuality. Pro-family organizations, working from a contagion model of homosexuality, contend that homosexuality is an immoral, unhealthy, and freely chosen vice. Many pro-gay organizations espouse an identity model of homosexuality under which sexual orientation is an immutable, unchosen, and benign characteristic. Both pro-family and pro-gay organizations believe that to define homosexuality is to control its legal and political status. This sometimes bitter debate regarding the nature of same-sex desire might seem like an exceedingly contemporary development. However, the ex-gay media blitz of 2000 represents only the latest ...


The Evolution Of The Public Trust Doctrine And The Degradation Of Trust Re- Sources: Courts, Trustees And Political Power In Wisconsin, Melissa K. Scanlan Jan 2000

The Evolution Of The Public Trust Doctrine And The Degradation Of Trust Re- Sources: Courts, Trustees And Political Power In Wisconsin, Melissa K. Scanlan

Melissa K. Scanlan

The public trust doctrine is rooted in ancient Roman law and the Wisconsin Constitution. Ancient Roman jurists be- lieved that the natural law concept that the waters are common to all was not subject to the changing whims of legis- latures. Similarly, modern theorists assert that a constitutionally-based doctrine will be more insulated from politics. This Comment demonstrates the limits of these theories. The trust doctrine is not immutable. Based on interviews with the trustees of Wisconsin's water resources, this Comment uncovers the constraints on the trustees. It shows that trust resources are at risk due to politically-motivated decisions ...


Globalization And Social Protection: The Impact Of Eu And International Rules In The Ratcheting Up Of U.S. Data Privacy Standards, Gregory C. Shaffer Jan 2000

Globalization And Social Protection: The Impact Of Eu And International Rules In The Ratcheting Up Of U.S. Data Privacy Standards, Gregory C. Shaffer

Gregory C Shaffer

No abstract provided.


The Evolving Police Power: Some Observations For A New Century, David B. Kopel, Glenn Harlan Reynolds Jan 2000

The Evolving Police Power: Some Observations For A New Century, David B. Kopel, Glenn Harlan Reynolds

David B Kopel

A review of state and federal courts decisions on the scope of state police powers suggests that the shift from the more restrictive sic utere principle to the more open salus populi principle may be reversing, with courts -- at least in cases involving sex and marriage -- taking a much more skeptical view of government objectives and justifications.


Of Enchantment: The Passing Of The Ordeals And The Rise Of The Jury Trial, Trisha Olson Jan 2000

Of Enchantment: The Passing Of The Ordeals And The Rise Of The Jury Trial, Trisha Olson

Trisha Olson

No abstract provided.


"Bad For Business": Contextual Analysis, Race Discrimination, And Fast Food, Regina Austin Jan 2000

"Bad For Business": Contextual Analysis, Race Discrimination, And Fast Food, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe Jan 2000

Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

After enactment of the first modern state adoption statute in 1851, adoption in the United States evolved as both a state judicial process and a specialized child welfare service to promote the best interest of children in need of permanent homes. This essay reviews developments during the last quarter of the century that force us to ask whether U.S. adoption is meeting the needs of children, its original child welfare intent, or serving the interests of adults.


Emerging Models For Alternatives To Marriage, Sanford N. Katz Jan 2000

Emerging Models For Alternatives To Marriage, Sanford N. Katz

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Perhaps one of the most important changes in family law in the past thirty years has been the inclusion of certain kinds of friendships in the range of relationships from which rights and responsibilities can flow. Domestic partnership laws, a phenomenon of the 1990s, may be seen as a natural development from the judicial recognition of contract cohabitation and the legislative and judicial response to same-sex couples who, unable to meet statutory requirements for marriage, have sought official recognition of their relationships. This essay discusses an aspect of certain kinds of domestic partnership laws-their formal requirements and the extent to ...


Toward A Prudential And Credibility-Centered Parol Evidence Rule, Lawrence A. Cunningham Jan 2000

Toward A Prudential And Credibility-Centered Parol Evidence Rule, Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The most influential judicial voices on the parol evidence rule are Roger Traynor and Richard Posner. Traynor pieced together aspects of positions championed by the antipodal titans of contracts, Arthur Corbin and Samuel Williston. Posner cuts through tangled doctrinal webs to show how the unifying talisman of the doctrine is credibility. Everything in parol evidence rule doctrine, in this formulation, can be understood in terms of two categories of evidence: subjective and objective. While the Traynor composite blended aspects of the titans of contracts into an incoherent stew, the Posner composite unites the central theme of the titans' positions, holding ...


Toward A More Independent Grand Jury: Recasting And Enforcing The Prosecutor’S Duty To Disclose Exculpatory Evidence, R. Michael Cassidy Jan 2000

Toward A More Independent Grand Jury: Recasting And Enforcing The Prosecutor’S Duty To Disclose Exculpatory Evidence, R. Michael Cassidy

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article analyzes the Supreme Court’s decision in Williams, in which the Court struck down an attempt by the Tenth Circuit to impose an obligation on federal prosecutors to disclose substantial exculpatory evidence to the grand jury. The author discusses the contours of this case and the ethical underpinnings of a prosecutor’s disclosure obligations before the grand jury, and sets forth a new framework for consideration of such issues.


A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang Jan 2000

A Liberal Theory Of Social Welfare: Fairness, Utility, And The Pareto Principle, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Possibility Of A Fair Paretian, Howard F. Chang Jan 2000

The Possibility Of A Fair Paretian, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Legacy Of Geographical Morality And Colonialism: A Historical Assessment Of The Current Crusade Against Corruption, Padideh Ala'i Jan 2000

The Legacy Of Geographical Morality And Colonialism: A Historical Assessment Of The Current Crusade Against Corruption, Padideh Ala'i

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This Article examines the legacy of the rule of geographical morality - that is the norm by which a citizen of the country in the North may engage in acts of corruption in any country in the South, including bribery and extortion, without the attachment of any moral condemnation to those acts. Part I of the Article begins by reviewing the impeachment trial of Warren Hastings, who served as Governor General of the Bengal from 1772-1785, on charges of bribery and corruption. It was during that impeachment proceeding when the words "principles of geographical morality" were used by, the prosectuor, Edmund ...