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Scriptural Justification For The American Revolution, Samuel Ewing Oct 2017

Scriptural Justification For The American Revolution, Samuel Ewing

Senior Honors Theses

This thesis will seek to examine the intention of the Founding Fathers regarding their decision to break from England in what became the American Revolution. On July 4th, 1776, fifty-five men gathered to sign the defining document of their cause – the Declaration of Independence. As the document presents the climactic argument against the English crown, this thesis will seek to analyze its writers’ intentions, presuppositions, and rationalizations. Ultimately, this thesis will demonstrate that the Founders not only sought biblical justification for their actions and opinions, but followed the letter of biblical and common law in order to please both ...


Good Selves And Just Wars, John Coons Dec 2015

Good Selves And Just Wars, John Coons

John Coons

No abstract provided.


The Resonance Of Christian Political Conceptions Within International Humanitarian Law, David B. Dennison Jan 2013

The Resonance Of Christian Political Conceptions Within International Humanitarian Law, David B. Dennison

David Brian Dennison

This paper presents conceptions from the Christian tradition that have special resonance modern International Humanitarian Law. The object of this paper supplies a lens that enables readers to detect the formative influence of unique Christian concepts. The conceptions from the Christian tradition presented include the Augustinian perspective on mortal and eternal life, the conception of a fallen world contrasted with a utopian vision, love as a motivation for peace, an expansive view of human community, the concept of role appropriate morality and the significance of outward signs and symbolism in the context of armed conflict.


History And The Characterization Of Law: Just War And Other Legal Things In The Age Of Positivism, John Lunstroth Jan 2012

History And The Characterization Of Law: Just War And Other Legal Things In The Age Of Positivism, John Lunstroth

John Lunstroth

If what is important in our affairs is that we know the truth, then are there present things about which we must know the past in order to know the truth? I argue there are, and that one category of those things is legal things, the law. By law I mean political theory, justice, right, rights, positive law and ethics; and all of the various ways those things have been understood by jurists. The way we reason about the law radically changed in the Enlightenment. By the end of the 18th century science and positivism as general methods of reason ...


Towards A Synthesis Between Islamic And Western Jus In Bello, Jacob Turner Jul 2011

Towards A Synthesis Between Islamic And Western Jus In Bello, Jacob Turner

Jacob Turner

In the body of international humanitarian law (‘IHL’), there is a lacuna regarding the status of combatants engaged in asymmetric warfare. This has arisen, at least in part, out of a failure to establish a satisfactory distinction between civilians and combatants reflecting the nature of such conflicts and commanding the respect of parties to them. The recent killing of Osama Bin Laden by US Special Forces Operatives has provided publicity to the debates regarding the legal status of irregular combatants. Some have claimed that Bin Laden ought to have been captured alive and tried in a court. The US administration ...


Are Institutions And Empiricism Enough? A Review Of Allen Buchanan, Human Rights, Legitimacy, And The Use Of Force, Matthew J. Lister Apr 2011

Are Institutions And Empiricism Enough? A Review Of Allen Buchanan, Human Rights, Legitimacy, And The Use Of Force, Matthew J. Lister

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Legal philosophers have given relatively little attention to international law in comparison to other topics, and philosophers working on international or global justice have not taken international law as a primary focus, either. Allen Buchanan’s recent work is arguably the most important exception to these trends. For over a decade he has devoted significant time and philosophical skill to questions central to international law, and has tied these concerns to related issues of global justice more generally. In what follows I review Buchanan’s new collection of essays, Human Rights, Legitimacy, and the Use of Force, paying special attention ...


Jus Ad Bellum And International Terrorism, Rein Mullerson Aug 2003

Jus Ad Bellum And International Terrorism, Rein Mullerson

International Law Studies

No abstract provided.


Applying Just War Jus Bello Doctrine To Reprisals: An Afghan Hypothetical, Michael F. Noone Jr. Jan 2001

Applying Just War Jus Bello Doctrine To Reprisals: An Afghan Hypothetical, Michael F. Noone Jr.

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

No abstract provided.


The 1977 Protocol I And The United States, Howard Levie Feb 1998

The 1977 Protocol I And The United States, Howard Levie

International Law Studies

First published in 38 Saint Louis University Law Journal 469 (1993)