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Jury

2011

Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Civil Practice And Procedure, John R. Walk, Andrew P. Sherrod Nov 2011

Civil Practice And Procedure, John R. Walk, Andrew P. Sherrod

University of Richmond Law Review

This article surveys recent significant developments in Virginia civil practice and procedure. Specifically, the article discusses opinions of the Supreme Court of Virginia from June 2010through June 2011 addressing civil procedure topics; significant amendments to the Rules of the Supreme Court of Virginia concerning procedural issues during the same period; and legislation enacted by the Virginia General Assembly during its 2011 session that relates to civil practice.


Criminal Law And Procedure, Virginia B. Theisen Nov 2011

Criminal Law And Procedure, Virginia B. Theisen

University of Richmond Law Review

Once more, the past year yielded a wealth of developments in the area of criminal law and procedure. The author has endeavored to cull the most significant decisions and legislative enactments, with an eye toward the "takeaway" from a case rather than a discussion of settled principles.


A Theory Of The Perverse Verdict, Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo Aug 2011

A Theory Of The Perverse Verdict, Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo

Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo

The concept of a perverse verdict is one that pervades the Criminal justice system of nearly all common law jurisdictions. The English Criminal Justice system is no exception and the concept has become institutionalised as if it were a true occurrence. This paper challenges the idea and argues that it is, technically, a legal non-event given the system of trial by jury. The theory is that besides the jury, no one else is invested with the power and authority to declare a verdict and this position is supported both by legal custom and the mechanism of the criminal justice system. …


Should Juries Be Informed That Municipality Will Indemnify Officer’S 1983 Liability For Constitutional Wrongdoing?, Martin A. Schwartz Jun 2011

Should Juries Be Informed That Municipality Will Indemnify Officer’S 1983 Liability For Constitutional Wrongdoing?, Martin A. Schwartz

Martin A. Schwartz

No abstract provided.


Vol. 2 No. 1, Spring 2011; Nolan & Ready--"Settling" For Less Than Perfect In Illinois When Determining The Role Defendants Play In The Litigation After They Settle, Benjamin W. Meyer May 2011

Vol. 2 No. 1, Spring 2011; Nolan & Ready--"Settling" For Less Than Perfect In Illinois When Determining The Role Defendants Play In The Litigation After They Settle, Benjamin W. Meyer

Northern Illinois Law Review Supplement

This Note examines the interplay of two decisions made by the Illinois Supreme Court during their 2008 – 2009 term—Ready v. United/Goedecke Services, Inc. and Nolan v. WEIL-McLain. Interpreting the statutory wording of the Illinois joint and several liability statute (735 ILCS 5/2-1117), Ready held that settled defendants may not be included on jury verdict forms when apportioning fault. The later decided Nolan held that a defendant may submit evidence of settled defendants in support of his sole proximate cause defense. This Note points out that the Nolan decision renders the Ready decision unworkable, because once a jury is exposed …


Attorney Duty To Search Case.Net For Juror Nondisclosure: Missouri Supreme Court Rule 69.025, John Constance Apr 2011

Attorney Duty To Search Case.Net For Juror Nondisclosure: Missouri Supreme Court Rule 69.025, John Constance

Missouri Law Review

The term voir dire derives from the Latin phrase verum dicere, literally meaning "to speak the truth."' In American jurisprudence, voir dire has come to mean the pretrial questioning of venire members during which a judge or party is given the opportunity to ask the prospective jurors questions in an attempt to reveal their personal tendencies and possible biases. Missouri courts have held that the right to a fair and impartial panel of twelve qualified jurors is the cornerstone of the judicial system. As such, it is the duty of prospective jurors on voir dire examination to "fully, fairly, and …


Jury Selection And The Coase Theorem, Dru Stevenson Mar 2011

Jury Selection And The Coase Theorem, Dru Stevenson

Dru Stevenson

The thesis of this article is that jury selection is unique among the components of the litigation process, in that zero negotiation or bargaining occurs between the parties over the substantive or procedural events that unfold – despite the absence of any prohibitions on such negotiation. This lack of bargaining is particularly striking given that the litigants are in the same room, where they could discuss things face to face. Negotiation, whether over the ultimate outcome or over specific issues within the case, pervades every other segment of litigation, from the pre-filing phase until after the verdict. It is therefore …


Information Overload, Multi-Tasking, And The Socially Networked Jury: Why Prosecutors Should Approach The Media Gingerly, Andrew Taslitz Feb 2011

Information Overload, Multi-Tasking, And The Socially Networked Jury: Why Prosecutors Should Approach The Media Gingerly, Andrew Taslitz

Andrew E. Taslitz

Abstract The rise of computer technology, the internet, rapid news dissemination, multi-tasking, and social networking have wrought changes in human psychology that alter how we process news media. More specifically, news coverage of high-profile trials necessarily focuses on emotionally-overwrought, attention-grabbing information disseminated to a public having little ability to process that information critically. The public’s capacity for empathy is likewise reduced, making it harder for trial processes to overcome the unfair prejudice created by the high-profile trial. Market forces magnify these changes. Free speech concerns limit the ability of the law to alter media coverage directly, and the tools available …


The Hidden Legacy Of Palsgraf: A Survey Of Modern Duty Law, W. Jonathan Cardi Feb 2011

The Hidden Legacy Of Palsgraf: A Survey Of Modern Duty Law, W. Jonathan Cardi

W. Jonathan Cardi

The elements of the debate between Justices Cardozo and Andrews in Palsgraf are canonical: (1) What is the nature of duty—is it relational or act-centered?; (2) Is plaintiff-foreseeability a duty inquiry or an aspect of proximate cause?; (3) Is court or jury the proper arbiter of foreseeability? An exhaustive examination of the case law on these questions reveals a deep disconnect between what most of us learned in law school and what is playing out in modern courts. Close scrutiny of Palsgraf’s present-day incarnations also lends an invaluable birds-eye view of duty law, an area so rife with inconsistency and …


Group Decision Making In The Jury Context: A Combined Theoretical Approach, Larissa Angelique Schmersal Jan 2011

Group Decision Making In The Jury Context: A Combined Theoretical Approach, Larissa Angelique Schmersal

Open Access Theses & Dissertations

Much of the extant research on jury decision making has been conducted at the juror level, examining the individual decisions of mock jurors. Although studying mock juror decisions provides initial insight into jury decision making, studying the deliberation process should be a priority for future research. Few theoretical models have been developed to examine the decision process of the jury. The social combination and the social communication approaches provide some insight into this process; however, analysis of these methods is scarce due, in part, to their limited applicability.

The current study examined the jury deliberation using a combined theoretical approach. …


The Dignity, Rights, And Responsibilities Of The Jury: On The Structure Of Normative Argument, Robert P. Burns Jan 2011

The Dignity, Rights, And Responsibilities Of The Jury: On The Structure Of Normative Argument, Robert P. Burns

Faculty Working Papers

Many theorists follow an inevitably circular method in evaluating legal institutions and practices. "Considered judgments of justice" embedded in practices and institutions in which we have a high level of confidence can serve as partial evidence for the principles with which they are consistent, principles that can then have broader implications. Conversely, principles that we have good reason to embrace can serve as partial justification for institutions and practices with which they are consistent. This is the heart of Rawls' notion of "reflective equilibrium," where we "work at both ends" to justify institutions, practices, and principles. This method is applicable …


People V. Guardino: Examined On Appeal In People V. Hecker, Luna Droubi Jan 2011

People V. Guardino: Examined On Appeal In People V. Hecker, Luna Droubi

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Normative Elements Of Parole Risk, W. David Ball Jan 2011

Normative Elements Of Parole Risk, W. David Ball

Faculty Publications

Parole boards evaluate the public safety risk posed by parole-eligible prisoners to determine whether they should be released. In this Essay, I argue that this process, at least as it operates in California, is fundamentally flawed because it asks the wrong question. Rather than ask whether an inmate poses any public safety risk, parole board officials should instead ask whether this risk is worth taking.

One way to answer this question would be to make our calculations more inclusive of all the costs and benefits of release and comparing them with the costs and benefits of retention. Elementary as this …


Victims Before International Criminal Courts: Some Views And Concerns Of An Icc Trial Judge, Christine Van Den Wyngaert Hon. Jan 2011

Victims Before International Criminal Courts: Some Views And Concerns Of An Icc Trial Judge, Christine Van Den Wyngaert Hon.

Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law

No abstract provided.


The Canadian Criminal Jury, Neil Vidmar, Regina Schuller Jan 2011

The Canadian Criminal Jury, Neil Vidmar, Regina Schuller

Faculty Scholarship

The Canadian criminal jury system has some unique characteristics. In contrast to American law, that gives precedent to free speech over fair trial, and English law, that favors fair trial over free speech, Canadian law occupies a middle ground balancing these competing values .Jury selection procedure in most trials is similar to that of England: jurors are assumed to be “impartial between the Queen and the accused” and are selected without a voir dire. However, in cases involving exceptional pretrial publicity or involving accused persons from racial or ethnic minority groups, jurors are vetted by a “challenge for cause” process …


Localism And Capital Punishment, Stephen F. Smith Jan 2011

Localism And Capital Punishment, Stephen F. Smith

Journal Articles

Professor Adam Gershowitz presents an interesting proposal to transfer from localities to states the power to enforce the death penalty. In his view, state-level enforcement would result in a more rationally applied death penalty because states would be much more likely to make capital charging decisions based on desert, without the distorting influence of the severe resource constraints applicable to all but the wealthiest of localities. As well conceived as Professor Gershowitz’s proposal is, however, I remain skeptical that statewide enforcement of the death penalty would be preferable to continued local enforcement. First, Professor Gershowitz underestimates the benefits of localism …