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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Integrative Effects Of Global Legal Pluralism, Monica Hakimi Jan 2020

The Integrative Effects Of Global Legal Pluralism, Monica Hakimi

Faculty Scholarship

International lawyers widely understand that legal pluralism is a fact of global life and that it can, in certain settings, be desirable. But many still approach it with some trepidation. A prominent skeptical claim is that pluralist structures lack the integrative resources that unify people around a shared governance project. This claim has been prominent with respect to two kinds of conflicts that are routine in international law: (1) conflicts that play out within a single international legal arrangement, and (2) conflicts that cut across multiple legal arrangements. For both, the skeptical claim is directed at the pluralist structure itself. …


Trade Openness And Antitrust Law, Anu Bradford, Adam S. Chilton Jan 2019

Trade Openness And Antitrust Law, Anu Bradford, Adam S. Chilton

Faculty Scholarship

Openness to international trade and adoption of antitrust laws can both curb anti-competitive behavior. But scholars have long debated the relationship between the two. Some argue that greater trade openness makes antitrust unnecessary, while others contend that antitrust laws are still needed to realize the benefits of trade liberalization. Data limitations have made this debate largely theoretical to date. We study the relationship between trade and antitrust empirically using new data on antitrust laws and enforcement activities. We find that trade openness and stringency of antitrust laws are positively correlated from 1950 to 2010 overall, but the positive correlation disappears …


The World Trade Organization: A Legal And Institutional Analysis, Anu Bradford Jan 2009

The World Trade Organization: A Legal And Institutional Analysis, Anu Bradford

Faculty Scholarship

The law of the WTO can be complex and the intricacies of the WTO hard to grasp even by someone who has spent years studying this area of law. In providing a clear, well-structured and highly accessible introduction to the legal and institutional aspects of the WTO, Jan Wouters and Bart De Meester offer a refreshingly uncomplicated book that walks the reader through the basic legal doctrine underlying international trade.


Legal Institutions And International Trade Flows, Daniel Berkowitz, Johannes Moenius, Katharina Pistor Jan 2004

Legal Institutions And International Trade Flows, Daniel Berkowitz, Johannes Moenius, Katharina Pistor

Faculty Scholarship

Globalization and increasing international flows of goods and capital have created a sense that the importance of individual nation states and the public goods they provide, including law and law enforcement institutions, is in decline. Opting out of domestic legal institutions and into those of a third country or into an "international" architecture have been elevated to important complements, if not substitutes for "good" institutions at home. If traders and investors could indeed effectively opt-out of their home jurisdiction's legal systems, we should observe empirically that the quality of domestic institutions has little impact on international patterns of trade flows. …


Self-Enforcing International Agreements And The Limits Of Coercion, Robert E. Scott, Paul B. Stephan Jan 2004

Self-Enforcing International Agreements And The Limits Of Coercion, Robert E. Scott, Paul B. Stephan

Faculty Scholarship

International law provides an ideal context for studying the effects of freedom from coercion on cooperative behavior. To be sure, almost all academic discussions on the subject begin by asking whether international law constitutes "law." But the category of all "international law" is too big and heterogeneous to permit useful analysis. Whether to regard, say, the rules governing the conduct of war or international humanitarian law as "law" presents radically different issues than analyzing the legal character of the Treaty of Rome (the constitutive instrument of the European Community), or the Warsaw Convention (the instrument governing contracts for the carriage …


Human Rights, Terrorism, And Trade – Remarks By Lori Fisler Damrosch, Lori Fisler Damrosch Jan 2002

Human Rights, Terrorism, And Trade – Remarks By Lori Fisler Damrosch, Lori Fisler Damrosch

Faculty Scholarship

By putting human rights first and terrorism in the middle, I hope to open up questions about linkages among these regimes and whether measures within one regime can advance objectives of the others.


Global Labor Rights And The Alien Tort Claims Act, Sarah H. Cleveland Jan 1998

Global Labor Rights And The Alien Tort Claims Act, Sarah H. Cleveland

Faculty Scholarship

Are labor rights human rights? Are some worker rights so fundamental that must be respected by all nations, and all corporations, under all circumstances? If so, who has the authority to define such rights, and how should they be enforced? What is the effect on the global economy of enforcing international worker rights? These are some of the questions confronted by the authors of Human Rights, Labor Rights, and International Trade, a compilation of essays by an international group of scholars, labor rights activists, and corporate executives addressing contemporary topics in the dialectic among labor, trade, and human rights.


The World Trading System: Law And Policy Of International Economic Relations, Lori Fisler Damrosch Jan 1990

The World Trading System: Law And Policy Of International Economic Relations, Lori Fisler Damrosch

Faculty Scholarship

This book serves an important need by providing a clear overview of an increasingly complex subject. The author, a leading figure in international trade law, has distilled his accumulated wisdom into an accessible account of the major features of the world trading system. His intended audience includes not only lawyers, but political scientists, economists, government officials and others as well. While he acknowledges that his own "comparative advantage" is in the legal aspects of the field (p. 6), he places the legal concepts in their political and economic context to write a treatment that will be enlightening to readers from …


Trade In Place Of Migration, Jagdish N. Bhagwati Jan 1980

Trade In Place Of Migration, Jagdish N. Bhagwati

Faculty Scholarship

This is a very useful and welcome study, sponsored by the World Employment Programme of the I.L.O., of the effects that increased trade flows could have on the level of employment in one “receiving country,” West Germany, and two sending countries, “Spain and Turkey,” and their implications for immigration policies.


General Equilibrium Theory And International Trade, Jagdish N. Bhagwati Jan 1973

General Equilibrium Theory And International Trade, Jagdish N. Bhagwati

Faculty Scholarship

This volume of Takashi Negishi's excellent essays in the theory of international trade underlines two major phenomena in this field: i) the displacement of the MarshalJian partialequilibriμm tools of analysis (now to be found only in the old-fashioned textbooks) by the general-equilibrium analysis of Mill, Marshan and Edgeworth which culminated in the major work of Meade and others; and ii) the emergence of a creative and ingenious school of Japanese international trade theorists in the last decade (of which Negishi is one of the more eminent members) which has virtually shifted the center of gravity in trade-theoretic research from England …


International Trade And Economic Expansion, Jagdish N. Bhagwati Jan 1958

International Trade And Economic Expansion, Jagdish N. Bhagwati

Faculty Scholarship

The recent literature on the effects of economic expansion on international trade has been concerned with two principal problems: the impact of the expansion on the terms of trade; and the resultant change in the welfare of the trading nations. The solutions offered, however, are not fully satisfactory. Thus H. G. Johnson [5) and W. M. Corden [3], who attempt to tackle the first problem, succeed only in establishing the direction, as distinct from the extent, of the consequential shift in the terms of trade. In so far as the full impact of the expansion on the terms of trade …