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Full-Text Articles in Law

Business Taxes And International Competitiveness, Michael S. Knoll May 2008

Business Taxes And International Competitiveness, Michael S. Knoll

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Around the world, policymakers are obsessed with the competitiveness of their domestic companies and domestically based multinational corporations (MNCs). Such concerns frequently influence policy, especially tax policy. In this paper, I develop a theory of how taxes affect the international competitiveness of businesses. I then use that theory to evaluate basic tax policy decisions, such as the choice between residence- and source-based taxation and the level of tax rates, and to understand the impact various provisions in the U.S. Internal Revenue Code are likely to have on the competitiveness of U.S.-based corporations and MNCs.


Clicks And Mortar: Taxing Multinational Business Profits In The Digital Age, Aldo Forgione Jan 2003

Clicks And Mortar: Taxing Multinational Business Profits In The Digital Age, Aldo Forgione

Seattle University Law Review

This Article argues that governments should abandon the treaty concept of permanent establishment and adopt international tax reforms that restore the primacy of "market country taxation of multi-national business profits promoted by domestic tax laws. Part I explores several emerging e-commerce issues that demonstrate the tension of introducing traditional tax norms to a digital environment. Part II reviews historical and recent developments in the international taxation of business profits and looks at the underlying trends and sentiments for reform of the existing system of global taxation of business income. Part III canvasses several prominent international tax reform alternatives proposed by ...


The Forgotten Link: Control In Section 482, Wayne M. Gazur Jan 1994

The Forgotten Link: Control In Section 482, Wayne M. Gazur

Articles

The foundation of international taxable income allocations between related parties is formed by the imposition of an arm's length standard. The presence of "control" over a person invokes this measure. The author examines the implications of control presented by continuing developments in the global business environment, including the rise of cooperative interfirm arrangements.