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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Right To Feast And Festivals, Juan C. Riofrio Jan 2021

The Right To Feast And Festivals, Juan C. Riofrio

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

Festive behavior is a basic characteristic of human life, as evidenced from ancient times. Humans need to use ceremony and ritual in specific places and times to mark their triumphs, joys, and sorrows. However, some categories of individuals are harmed because they cannot celebrate the most important highlights of their lives through such festive feasts: prisoners, mariners at sea, soldiers on the frontlines, workers subject to the pressures of ungenerous employers, towns occupied by oppressive invaders, and impoverished individuals who cannot afford customary celebrations, among others. When feasts and festivals are restricted, societies lose well-being, communities lose identity, and individuals …


Looking To The Future: The Scope, Value And Operationalization Of International Human Rights Law, Lorna Mcgregor Jan 2019

Looking To The Future: The Scope, Value And Operationalization Of International Human Rights Law, Lorna Mcgregor

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The international human rights system of which international human rights law (IHRL) is a part has been critiqued for being ineffective, too legal, insufficiently self-critical, and elitist, with some claiming that it self-generates some of the challenges it faces. This Article challenges this presentation of IHRL and in doing so, sets out three priorities for its future development. These are first, that it should continue to engage in critical analysis of how IHRL can effectively respond to the complex and multifactorial challenges it faces. Second, rather than refrain from developing due to critiques of over expansion, IHRL should prioritize the …


In Defense Of Human Rights, Karima Bennoune Jan 2019

In Defense Of Human Rights, Karima Bennoune

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

This Article argues that international human rights law, and the human rights movement more generally, need more defenders than critics in the current international political environment. Groups ranging from academics to governments have taken stances critical of human rights, and this Article seeks to defend the rights framework from some of these while also arguing for the importance of human rights in today's world. Noting that the field of human rights is not beyond criticism, this Article embraces some of those criticisms. However, it suggests that human rights law specialists need to spend at least as much time defending human …


Transitional Justice In Housing Injustice: The Case Of Housing Rights Violations Within Settler Democracies, Manal Totry-Jubran Jan 2019

Transitional Justice In Housing Injustice: The Case Of Housing Rights Violations Within Settler Democracies, Manal Totry-Jubran

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The right to housing is recognized by international human rights treaties as an integral part of the right to an adequate standard of living. Many states have ratified these treaties and incorporated protection of some aspects of housing rights into their constitutions and domestic legislation. Other states have not enacted any legislation in recognition of housing rights, but they provide judicial remedies for violations of rights. Despite that, domestic and international reports indicate that housing rights are constantly being violated in countries across the world at different levels.

This Article focuses on housing rights violations within "settler democracies." Such countries …


"Measuring" The Erosion Of Academic Freedom As An International Human Right, Klaus D. Beiter, Terence Karran, Kwadwo Appiagyei-Atua Jan 2016

"Measuring" The Erosion Of Academic Freedom As An International Human Right, Klaus D. Beiter, Terence Karran, Kwadwo Appiagyei-Atua

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

This Article reports and comments on the results of an assessment of the legal protection of the right to academic freedom (an examination of its factual protection to be undertaken at a future point) in EU member states, having examined these countries' constitutions, laws on higher education, and other relevant legislation. The assessment relied on a standard scorecard, developed by utilizing indicators of protection of academic freedom, notably as reflected in UNESCO's Recommendation concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel, a document of 1997 that is not legally, but "politically" binding, and which concretizes international human rights requirements in respect …


Female Genital Mutilation And Designer Vaginas In Britain: Crafting An Effective Legal And Policy Framework, Lisa R. Avalos Jan 2015

Female Genital Mutilation And Designer Vaginas In Britain: Crafting An Effective Legal And Policy Framework, Lisa R. Avalos

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) in Britain and Europe has grown in recent years as a result of international migration, and European institutions have grown increasingly concerned with eradicating the practice. According to the European Parliament, approximately 500,000 girls and women living in Europe have undergone FGM and are suffering with the lifelong consequences of the procedure, and more than 30,000 girls in Britain are thought to be at risk of future FGM. Although Britain strengthened its law against FGM in 2003, the number of girls at risk continues to grow, and there have been no convictions for …


Separation Anxiety? Rethinking The Role Of Morality In International Human Rights Lawmaking, Vijay M. Padmanabhan Jan 2014

Separation Anxiety? Rethinking The Role Of Morality In International Human Rights Lawmaking, Vijay M. Padmanabhan

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The conventional accounts of international law do a poor job accounting for human rights. International legal positivists generally argue that there is a strict separation of law and morality, with no role for moral obligation in the validation of law. But human rights practice reveals many situations in which it appears that morality is validating legal obligation. Process theorists recognize an intrinsic role for the values underlying international law in understanding its commands. But they embrace a vision of law as dialogue that fails to protect the right to self-determination that is a core value of human rights.

This Article …


Optimal Asylum, Shalini B. Ray Jan 2013

Optimal Asylum, Shalini B. Ray

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

The U.S. asylum system is noble but flawed. Scholars have long recognized that asylum is a "scarce" political resource, but U.S. law persists in distributing access to asylum based on an asylum seeker's ability to circumvent migration controls rather than the strength of the asylum seeker's claim for protection. To apply for asylum, an asylum seeker must either arrange to be smuggled into the United States or lie to the consulate while abroad to obtain a nonimmigrant visa. Nonimmigrant visa requirements effectively filter the pool of asylum applicants according to wealth, educational attainment, and intent not to remain in the …


A Global Water Apartheid: From Revelation To Resolution, Itzchak Kornfeld Jan 2010

A Global Water Apartheid: From Revelation To Resolution, Itzchak Kornfeld

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

It is well settled in international human rights law that a human right to water exists. Nevertheless, to date, there has been little scholarship about what the practical contours of the right should be. If legal tools are to benefit the world's poor and disenfranchised, they cannot be void due to the impossibility of implementation. This is the problem with the purported human right to water: it is quixotic.

This Article proposes a pragmatic solution to the potable water problem for the world's poor. The solution offered here is based on a model of privatized access to water grounded in …


Panacea Or Pathetic Fallacy? The Swiss Ban On Minarets, Lorenz Langer Jan 2010

Panacea Or Pathetic Fallacy? The Swiss Ban On Minarets, Lorenz Langer

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

On November 29, 2009, Swiss voters adopted a ballot initiative introducing a constitutional ban on the construction of minarets. This Article provides a thick description of the minaret vote's context. A legal analysis addresses the implications of the ban under national, regional, and international normative frameworks. The Article argues that the ban is irreconcilable with the Swiss constitutional bill of rights and several international human right provisions. In Switzerland, however, respect for the vox populi potentially trumps any concern over conflicting international obligations, and there is no effective judicial review of initiatives. This lack of judicial review is partly a …


Resolving The Dissonance Of Rodriguez And The Right To Education, Angela A. Holland Jan 2008

Resolving The Dissonance Of Rodriguez And The Right To Education, Angela A. Holland

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Education exists as a fundamental right recognized by countries worldwide. Overwhelming support for the right to education is reflected in international human rights instruments, including the International Convention on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Notwithstanding a near global consensus on this issue, the United States has refused to recognize a federal right to education since the 1973 Supreme Court decision San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez. The ill-effects of Rodriguez linger today; glaring disparities continue to mar the educational prospects of women, minorities, and poor children in the United States. …


Human Dignity In The Line Of Fire: The Application Of International Human Rights Law During Armed Conflict, Occupation, And Peace Operations, John Cerone Jan 2006

Human Dignity In The Line Of Fire: The Application Of International Human Rights Law During Armed Conflict, Occupation, And Peace Operations, John Cerone

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

One of the most controversial and politically charged issues in current human rights discourse is whether and to what extent states are bound by human rights obligations with respect to the conduct of their armed forces abroad in armed conflict, occupation, and peace operations. Underlying the controversy are a number of complex legal questions, several of which have eluded definitive resolution. Chief among these questions is whether individuals affected by the conflict are among those whose rights states are obliged to secure. Answering these questions is further complicated in situations of collective action, giving rise to such questions as whether …


Interim Measures In International Human Rights: Evolution And Harmonization, Jo M. Pasqualucci Jan 2005

Interim Measures In International Human Rights: Evolution And Harmonization, Jo M. Pasqualucci

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

In this Article, the Author undertakes a comprehensive study of interim measures ordered in human rights cases before six international enforcement bodies--the International Court of Justice, the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the United Nations Human Rights Committee, the United Nations Committee against Torture, and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. An order of interim measures may require that the State take positive action, such as providing protection for human rights activists or journalists, or it may call upon the State to refrain from taking action, such as not extraditing a person or delaying …


Tort Au Canadien: A Proposal For Canadian Tort Legislation On Gross Violations Of International Human Rights And Humanitarian Law, Caroline Davidson Jan 2005

Tort Au Canadien: A Proposal For Canadian Tort Legislation On Gross Violations Of International Human Rights And Humanitarian Law, Caroline Davidson

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Despite Canada's strong rhetoric on the protection of human rights, Canada lacks a meaningful tort scheme for gross human rights violations akin to that of the United States. This Article argues that legislation to facilitate tort suits for gross violations of international human rights and humanitarian law can be consistent with, and in fact supports, Canada's commitments to human rights, the rule of law and multilateralism. In particular, provincial tort legislation should be one of a panoply of mechanisms in place to punish and deter violations of international humanitarian and human rights law. This Article proposes the shape of the …


Laying One Bankrupt Critique To Rest: "Sosa V. Alvarez-Machain" And The Future Of International Human Rights Litigation In U.S. Courts, Ralph G. Steinhardt Nov 2004

Laying One Bankrupt Critique To Rest: "Sosa V. Alvarez-Machain" And The Future Of International Human Rights Litigation In U.S. Courts, Ralph G. Steinhardt

Vanderbilt Law Review

In offering a form of civil redress to the victims of international human rights violations, litigation under the Alien Tort Statute ("ATS") has come to reflect in microcosm the ways that international law and practice have changed in the last half century. Specifically, the successful ATS cases since the Second Circuit's seminal decision in Fildrtiga v. Peia-Irala illustrate the blurring of certain structural distinctions that had long given international law its characteristic shape, especially the distinctions between public and private international law, between treaties and custom, between state and nonstate actors, between international and domestic law, and between lex lata …


Outrelativizing Relativism: A Liberal Defense Of The Universality Of International Human Rights, Robert D. Sloane Jan 2001

Outrelativizing Relativism: A Liberal Defense Of The Universality Of International Human Rights, Robert D. Sloane

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

This Article seeks to provide a new framework, rooted in classical liberalism, for understanding and defending the universality of international human rights. After reviewing the philosophical and historical development of the idea of universality, Part II argues that none of the traditional justifications for conceiving of international human rights as universal succeed. Cultural pluralism therefore must be accepted as a descriptive truth. But to acknowledge the cultural contingency of values as a descriptive claim does not, by itself, undermine the normative claim that human rights are, or should be, universal. Instead, it points to the need to justify universality within …


The Right To Stay, Patrick M. Mcfadden Jan 1996

The Right To Stay, Patrick M. Mcfadden

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

People often fight for their homes. Once established, homes are vital centers of life, and their threatened loss generates predictable resistance. This Article shows how the human desire not to be moved is protected by the law. Such protection can be found in both U.S. domestic and international law, although the two systems of law vary widely in their approach. Since World War II, international scholars and lawmakers have been deeply concerned with promoting the legal rights of people to leave and return to their own countries. This Article emphasizes a different, but equally important right: the right of people, …