Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park Oct 2003

The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

If a pollster asked a random selection of Americans for a one-line verbal portrait of arbitration, common responses might include the following: (i) private litigation arising for construction and business disputes; (ii) a mechanism to resolve workplace tensions between management and labor; (iii) a process by which finance companies and stock brokers shield themselves from customer complaints; (iv) a way to level the playing field in deciding commercial controversies among companies from different parts of the world; (v) the way big corporations use NAFTA to escape regulation. To some extent all would be correct.'

Unfortunately, these different varieties of arbitration …


The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park Jan 2003

The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park

Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law

Arbitration by its nature is polycentric: one might more accurately speak of arbitrations in the plural. A wide variety of disputes are included in one category, implicating differences related to the sophistication of the parties, the character of the disputes, and the public interests at stake. The current legal framework for arbitration conducted in the United States attempts to squeeze all types of arbitration into the Procrustean bed of a single set of standards for judicial review.

The United States should seriously consider eliminating judicial discretion to review the substantive merits of awards in international cases. The domestically nourished doctrine …


The American Influence On International Arbitration, Roger P. Alford Jan 2003

The American Influence On International Arbitration, Roger P. Alford

Journal Articles

It is indisputable that the international arbitration world is an identifiable epistemic community that transcends national borders, and whose members are shaped by their own experience. Increasingly, that experience reflects an American influence, be it heritage, training, affiliation, or client base. In these remarks, Professor Alford addresses three issues related to the Americanization of international arbitration. The first is whether international arbitration has, in fact, only recently become Americanized. He posits instead that there is always an ebb and flow to the level of the United States' involvement in international arbitration. During the drafting and signing of the 1958 New …