Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in Law

"Keep To The Code”: A Global Code Of Conduct For Third-Party Funders, Victoria Sahani Dec 2022

"Keep To The Code”: A Global Code Of Conduct For Third-Party Funders, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

Global commercial third-party funding has given rise to wide-ranging regulatory approaches worldwide. Consequently, funders can engage in cross-border regulatory arbitrage by exploiting regulatory gaps within and among nations. This Article argues that the global community of nations should articulate a universal approach to the behavioral expectations of third-party funders operating transnationally, independent of local laws regarding the technical business of funding. It asserts that the key to fostering the ethical development of the third-party funding industry is to develop a globally applicable but locally enforced code of conduct or professional responsibility for the industry. Moreover, a successful regime for funder …


A Hardy Case Makes Bad Law, Victoria Sahani Dec 2019

A Hardy Case Makes Bad Law, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

This Article is the first ever to analyze a direct clash between the inherent power of US courts regarding the enforcement ofjudgments and the obligations of the United States as one of the 163 member countries of the 1965 Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes between States and Nationals of Other States, commonly known as the "ICSID Convention. " The ICSID Convention includes a self-enforcement mechanism whereby the courts of the member countries are obligated to enforce the pecuniary obligations in multimillion (and sometimes over one billion) dollar ICSID arbitration awards as though they were court judgments of the …


Retour Sur L’Affaire De L’Alabama: De L’Utilité Et De L’Histoire Pour L'Arbitrage International, William W. Park, Bruno De Fumichon Jan 2019

Retour Sur L’Affaire De L’Alabama: De L’Utilité Et De L’Histoire Pour L'Arbitrage International, William W. Park, Bruno De Fumichon

Faculty Scholarship

For any aficionado of international law and international arbitration, the 1872 Alabama case represents a rich historical landmark, as promising a mine as the wreck of the Confederate Ship Alabama itself, sunk off Cherbourg, in 1864, by the United States Ship Kearsarge. This arbitration represents a turning point in relations between the United States and Great Britain, from repeated conflict to a “Special Relationship” that has grown stronger during the past century and a half. The case also marked the revival of international arbitration, after centuries of uncertainty. Not least, the case introduced long-lasting procedural innovations: the neutral collegial tribunal, …


Unity And Diversity In International Law, William W. Park Jan 2019

Unity And Diversity In International Law, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

The primordial Greek sea-god Proteus could alter his shape at will, notwithstanding that his divine substance remained the same. Reinventing himself by adapting to new circumstances, Proteus still stayed unchanged in essence.

Unlike the sea-god’s protean nature, the substance of international law may well undergo alterations when examined through the telescope of legal culture, or with predispositions of divergent educational backgrounds. For the thoughtful reader, scholarly speculation on such variations will be triggered by reading Is International Law International?. In that book, Professor Anthea Roberts explores a variety of elements in the teaching and practice of international law, viewed …


A Conversation With Professor William W. (Rusty) Park, William W. Park Nov 2018

A Conversation With Professor William W. (Rusty) Park, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

ABBY COHEN SMUTNY*: The ITA’s Academic Council has an interesting and very useful project, which is called Preserving Perspectives. It is a project to interview leading arbitrators regarding the development and evolution of international arbitration. This has led to a series of wonderful videos that are posted on ITA’s website. These videos are a tremendously rich resource and I encourage you to check them out on ITA’s website.

I’m now delighted to introduce to you the next interview in this important series. Professor and member of our academic council Catherine Rogers will be interviewing Professor Rusty Park, and …


Third-Party Funding In International Arbitration, Victoria Sahani Nov 2017

Third-Party Funding In International Arbitration, Victoria Sahani

Shorter Faculty Works

Third-party funding, also known as litigation funding, is a financing method in which an entity that is not a party to a particular dispute funds another party’s legal fees or pays an order, award, or judgment rendered against that party, or both. Third-party funding is a growing phenomenon that is becoming more mainstream in both the litigation and the international arbitration communities. The leading jurisdictions worldwide — in terms of volume and sophistication of third-party funding arrangements — are Australia, the U.K., the U.S. and Germany. In the past, third-party funding was a smaller niche market, but in recent years, …


Reshaping Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani Feb 2017

Reshaping Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

Third-party funding is a controversial business arrangement whereby an outside entity—called a third-party funder—finances the legal representation of a party involved in litigation or arbitration or finances a law firm’s portfolio of cases in return for a profit. Attorney ethics regulations and other laws permit nonlawyers to become partial owners of law firms in the District of Columbia, England and Wales, Scotland, Australia, two provinces in Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, and other jurisdictions around the world. Recently, a U.S.-based third-party funder that is publicly traded in England started its own law firm in England. In addition, some U.S. …


Judging Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani Feb 2016

Judging Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

Third-party funding is an arrangement whereby an outside entity finances the legal representation of a party involved in litigation or arbitration. The outside entity—called a “third-party funder”—could be a bank, hedge fund, insurance company, or some other entity or individual that finances the party’s legal representation in return for a profit. Third-party funding is a controversial, dynamic, and evolving phenomenon. The practice has attracted national headlines and the attention of the Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (Advisory Committee). The Advisory Committee stated in a recent report that “judges currently have the power to obtain information about …


Africa's New Economic Partnerships And Dispute Settlement, Victoria Sahani Jan 2016

Africa's New Economic Partnerships And Dispute Settlement, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

This panel was convened at 11:00 a.m., Thursday, March 31, 2016, by its moderator Uche Ewelukwa of the University of Arkansas School of Law, who introduced the panelists: Victoria Shannon Sahani of Washington and Lee University School of Law; David H. Shinn of George Washington University School of Law; and Thomas R. Snider of Greenberg Traurig LLP.


Arbitration's Discontents: Between The Pernicious And The Precarious, William W. Park Oct 2014

Arbitration's Discontents: Between The Pernicious And The Precarious, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

Arbitration has become a victim of its own success, as its wider use has triggered a flood of doubt, disapproval and denunciation. In consequence, higher visibility for arbitral proceedings and awards has led to increased criticism, both just and unjust, with respect to arbitrator independence and impartiality. A robust dispute resolution process requires balance between fairness and efficiency, keeping arbitrators free from taint while at the same time reducing the prospect of dilatory tactics aimed at sabotaging proceedings. If litigants hope to have their disputes resolved by intelligent and experienced individuals, criteria for arbitrator impartiality and independence will need to …


The Cohasset Marshlands Dispute: International Arbitration In Colonial New England, William W. Park Oct 2014

The Cohasset Marshlands Dispute: International Arbitration In Colonial New England, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

One of the earliest international arbitrations in the Americas arose from rival claims to hayfields contested between two groups of religious dissidents. The dispute resolution process which unfolded in 1640 between the Massachusetts and Plymouth colonies takes special significance as an epochal step toward the robust cross-border cooperation that ultimately united thirteen disparate colonies into a single nation.


Third-Party Funding In International Arbitration: The Icca Queen-Mary Task Force, William W. Park, Catherine A. Rogers Oct 2014

Third-Party Funding In International Arbitration: The Icca Queen-Mary Task Force, William W. Park, Catherine A. Rogers

Faculty Scholarship

Third-party funding raises a host of ethical and procedural issues for international arbitration, perhaps most notably in connection with arbitrator comportment. The need for sustained study of these concerns prompted establishment of a Task Force on Third-Party Funding in International Arbitration, convened by the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) along with Queen Mary College at the University of London. The Task Force, comprised of stakeholders from a range of viewpoints and backgrounds, will assess both real and perceived concerns that this relatively new practice raises, as well as what might be done, and why. This article outlines the Task …


Chapter 16: Transnational Legal Process Theories, Maya Steinitz Feb 2014

Chapter 16: Transnational Legal Process Theories, Maya Steinitz

Faculty Scholarship

THIS chapter is devoted to transnational legal process theories. In 1955, Philip Jessup, in his Storrs Lectures at Yale, famously coined the term “transnational law” as he searched for a concept that would capture the legal regulation of actions or events that transcend national boundaries and that can accommodate both public and private international law. Further, while the traditional concept of “international law” referred to the law regulating relationships between states, the new term encompassed legal relationships of and amongst individuals, corporations, and organizations as well as states.

In other words, as early as the 1950s, and thereafter with increased …


Recent Developments In Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani Jan 2013

Recent Developments In Third-Party Funding, Victoria Sahani

Faculty Scholarship

This article addresses recent developments in third-party funding that occurred during late 2012 and early 2013 in the three leading jurisdictions: Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. The most important developments are the following. On 22 April 2013, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) issued regulatory guidelines clarifying the status of funders with respect to ASIC’s regulations and detailing how funders should manage conflicts of interest and handle certain provisions of their funding arrangements. In the United Kingdom, the Jackson Reforms took effect on 1 April 2013, bringing sweeping changes to the allowable fee agreements, discovery rules …


Whose Claim Is This Anyway? Third Party Litigation Funding, Maya Steinitz Jan 2011

Whose Claim Is This Anyway? Third Party Litigation Funding, Maya Steinitz

Faculty Scholarship

Third party litigation funding, or litigation finance, is a new industry composed of institutional investors who invest in litigation by providing finance in return for an ownership stake in a legal claim and a contingency in the recovery. Its emergence has been recognized as one of the most significant developments in civil litigation today. It will transform access to justice, and affect numerous areas of the law including corporate law, torts, intellectual property, environmental law, employment law and international law. Hailing from the U.K. and Australia, the practice is de facto prohibited in the U.S., largely through ethical rules disallowing …


The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park Oct 2003

The Specificity Of International Arbitration: The Case For Faa Reform, William W. Park

Faculty Scholarship

If a pollster asked a random selection of Americans for a one-line verbal portrait of arbitration, common responses might include the following: (i) private litigation arising for construction and business disputes; (ii) a mechanism to resolve workplace tensions between management and labor; (iii) a process by which finance companies and stock brokers shield themselves from customer complaints; (iv) a way to level the playing field in deciding commercial controversies among companies from different parts of the world; (v) the way big corporations use NAFTA to escape regulation. To some extent all would be correct.'

Unfortunately, these different varieties of arbitration …


International Commercial Dispute Resolution, William W. Park, Andrea K. Bjorklund, Jack J. Coe Jan 2003

International Commercial Dispute Resolution, William W. Park, Andrea K. Bjorklund, Jack J. Coe

Faculty Scholarship

A recent Court of Appeals decision has made it more difficult for judges in the United States to second-guess arbitrators in international cases. To understand the significance of the recent decision, one must remember that the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) has been interpreted to permit vacatur of awards in an international arbitration on the same grounds available in domestic cases. Thus, a litigant who is unhappy with an arbitrator's decision gets a chance to re-argue the case by alleging "manifest disregard of the law," a ground for judicial review created fifty years ago by Supreme Court dictum.