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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Scramble To Promote Egg Donation Through A More Protective Regulatory Regime, Jacob Radecki Apr 2015

The Scramble To Promote Egg Donation Through A More Protective Regulatory Regime, Jacob Radecki

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Egg “donation” is a burgeoning industry in the United States. Fertility clinics capitalize on financially needy college students by advertising substantial financial benefits; particularly gifted women may receive thousands of dollars for selling their eggs. Rosy advertisements portray a well-paying procedure that also helps bring a child to a loving parent. Yet these descriptions mask significant potential harms. With respect to known problems, hormone regimens may cause ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome, which in the most severe cases can lead to infertility. In terms of unknown risks, anecdotal evidence suggests that the long-term side effects of egg extraction may include cancer. The ...


Giving In To Baby Markets: Regulation Without Prohibition, Sonia M. Suter Jan 2009

Giving In To Baby Markets: Regulation Without Prohibition, Sonia M. Suter

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

The commodification of reproductive material evokes different responses. Some argue that the sale of reproductive material should be prohibited. Others argue in favor of unfettered baby markets on principle or to achieve broad-scale access to reproductive technologies. In this Article, the author responds to the emergence of baby markets with great skepticism, but reluctant acceptance. Drawing on a relational conception of autonomy and self-definition, she argues that commodification of reproductive material is intrinsically harmful. Moreover, such commodification poses a number of consequential harms. Nevertheless, in spite of these concerns, the author "gives in" to baby markets, which is to say ...


The Custody Battle Over Cryogenically Preserved Embryos After Divorce: Advocating For Infertile Women’S Rights, Cori S. Annapolen Oct 2005

The Custody Battle Over Cryogenically Preserved Embryos After Divorce: Advocating For Infertile Women’S Rights, Cori S. Annapolen

ExpressO

This paper focuses on the struggles that infertile women face to achieve motherhood because their rights are underrepresented in the American court system. It specifically centers on how the process of in vitro fertilization (IVF) helps infertile women conceive children, but then details the problems that increasing technology now causes for these women after they freeze embryos and then divorce. Because the courts of only four states have determined who gets custody of these embryos after a divorce, and because the divorce rate and the number of couples utilizing IVF are increasing, future states will likely be forced to answer ...


Cloning And The Preservation Of Family Integrity, David Orentlicher Jan 1999

Cloning And The Preservation Of Family Integrity, David Orentlicher

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Choice, Conscience, And Context, Mary Crossley Jan 1996

Choice, Conscience, And Context, Mary Crossley

Articles

Building on Professor Michael H. Shapiro's critique of arguments that some uses of new reproductive technologies devalue and use persons inappropriately (which is part of a Symposium on New Reproductive Technologies), this work considers two specific practices that increasingly are becoming part of the new reproductive landscape: selective reduction of multiple pregnancy and prenatal genetic testing to enable selective abortion. Professor Shapiro does not directly address either practice, but each may raise troubling questions that sound suspiciously like the arguments that Professor Shapiro sought to discredit. The concerns that selective reduction and prenatal genetic screening raise, however, relate not ...