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Immigration

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 40

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review Of Lawyers In The Dock: Learning From Attorney Disciplinary Proceedings, By Richard L. Abel, Eli Wald Nov 2009

Book Review Of Lawyers In The Dock: Learning From Attorney Disciplinary Proceedings, By Richard L. Abel, Eli Wald

Journal of Legal Education

No abstract provided.


The International Law Of Economic Migration: Toward The Fourth Freedom, Joel P. Trachtman Sep 2009

The International Law Of Economic Migration: Toward The Fourth Freedom, Joel P. Trachtman

Upjohn Press

This volume examines the welfare economics, political economy, and legal experience in international economic migration, and on the basis of its analysis, suggests the structure of a multilateral framework agreement on international economic migration.


Defining “Sexual Abuse Of A Minor” In Immigration Law: Finding A Place For Uniformity, Fairness And Feminism, Kate Barth Sep 2009

Defining “Sexual Abuse Of A Minor” In Immigration Law: Finding A Place For Uniformity, Fairness And Feminism, Kate Barth

Kate S. Barth

This article examines the circuit split over the proper definition of the term "sexual abuse of a minor" in the Immigration and Nationality Act, using considerations of fairness, uniform application of the law, and feminist perceptions of the purpose of statutory rape laws to help guide analysis. The Board of Immigration Appeals, the Second, Third, Fifth, Seventh, and Eleventh Circuits have tied the term "sexual abuse of a minor" to the definition given in 18 U.S.C § 3509(a)(8). The Ninth Circuit, on the other hand, recently decided that the term should more properly be tied to the ...


The New Sanctuary Movement: When Moral Mission Means Breaking The Law, And The Consequences For Churches And Illegal Immigrants, Kara L. Wild Aug 2009

The New Sanctuary Movement: When Moral Mission Means Breaking The Law, And The Consequences For Churches And Illegal Immigrants, Kara L. Wild

Kara L. Wild

Are the churches involved in the New Sanctuary Movement -- a movement that hides illegal immigrants in churches to prevent them from being deported -- acting legally? If not, is there a way that they could pursue their goals in a legal manner? The author explores the movement's goal, to win public sympathy and eventual legality for the nation's illegal immigrant population by using methods that were popular during the successful 1980s Sanctuary Movement. The author examines the differences between the 1980s Movement and the current one, the likelihood of success for the New Sanctuary Movement's legal arguments, and ...


Battered, Broken, Bruised, Or Abandoned: Domestic Strife Presents Foreign Nationals Access To Immigration Relief, Misty Wilson Borkowski Jul 2009

Battered, Broken, Bruised, Or Abandoned: Domestic Strife Presents Foreign Nationals Access To Immigration Relief, Misty Wilson Borkowski

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Streamlining" The Rule Of Law: How The Department Of Justice Is Undermining Judicial Review Of Agency Action, Shruti Rana May 2009

"Streamlining" The Rule Of Law: How The Department Of Justice Is Undermining Judicial Review Of Agency Action, Shruti Rana

Shruti Rana

Judicial review of administrative decision making is an essential institutional check on agency power. Recently, however, the Department of Justice dramatically revised its regulations in an attempt to insulate its decision making from public and federal court scrutiny. These “streamlining” rules, carried out in the name of national security and immigration reform, have led to a breakdown in the rule of law in our judicial system. While much attention has been focused on the Department of Justice’s recent attempts to shield executive power from the reach of Congress, its efforts to undermine judicial review have so far escaped such ...


The Life Cycle Of Immigration: A Tale Of Two Migrants, William J. Aceves, James M. Cooper Apr 2009

The Life Cycle Of Immigration: A Tale Of Two Migrants, William J. Aceves, James M. Cooper

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Two Years Later, How Far Have We Come: A Review Of The 2006 Measures Of Improvement To The Immigration Courts And Board Of Immigration Appeals, Christina M. Workman Mar 2009

Two Years Later, How Far Have We Come: A Review Of The 2006 Measures Of Improvement To The Immigration Courts And Board Of Immigration Appeals, Christina M. Workman

Christina M Workman

I have attaches for your review a copy of “How Far Have We Come: A Review of the 2006 Measures of Improvement to the Immigration Courts and Board of Immigration Appeals”. In this article I first explore the causes of large disparities in asylum denial rates both between and within Immigration Courts across the United States. In one Court alone, one judge grants asylum 9% of the time, while another judge on that same Court grants asylum 91% percent of the time. Critics of the Immigration Courts, including Federal Appellate Courts, have citied reasons including but not limited to poor ...


“Otherness” As The Underlying Principle In Israel’S Asylum Regime, Tally Kritzman-Amir Mar 2009

“Otherness” As The Underlying Principle In Israel’S Asylum Regime, Tally Kritzman-Amir

Tally Kritzman-Amir

This paper aims to be one of the first thorough descriptions of the developing asylum system in the State of Israel. The argument presented in this paper is that, despite the inherent moral and doctrinal differences between asylum and immigration regimes, the Israeli asylum system is essentially an extension of Israel’s immigration and citizenship regime, as it excludes the non-Jewish refugees and frames the refugee as the “other.”

I begin this paper with a description of the Israeli immigration and citizenship regime. I show how the Israeli regime favors and includes Jews, and discriminates and excludes non-Jews, with the ...


Day Labor Markets And Public Space, Gregg Kettles Feb 2009

Day Labor Markets And Public Space, Gregg Kettles

Gregg Kettles

Day laborers standing on street corners have become a more common, and more controversial, sight in many U.S. cities. Taking them to be evidence of public disorder and illegal immigration out of control, some communities have responded by adopting the strategy of exclusion. They have revived the enforcement of ordinances against loitering and vagrancy, and changed traffic rules to discourage drivers from stopping to pick up workers. Other communities have responded by adopting the strategy of shelter. Viewing street corner day laborers as vulnerable, these communities have opened indoor work centers that offer job placement and other services. Both ...


Looking Behind ‘Protection Gap’: The Moral Obligation Of The State To Necessitous Immigrants, Tally Kritzman-Amir Jan 2009

Looking Behind ‘Protection Gap’: The Moral Obligation Of The State To Necessitous Immigrants, Tally Kritzman-Amir

Tally Kritzman-Amir

Do states have a moral obligation towards immigrants whose immigration is a result of necessity? While some types of necessitous immigrants receive international protection because states hold legal duties towards them, many others are left unprotected. This article looks into this “protection gap” and examines that moral justification for eliminating it by imposing additional obligations on states towards additional immigrants. Part I examines the international law foundations of this dilemma. Part II offers a typology of the different moral obligations that states might owe to different immigrants. Parts III, IV and V suggest a theoretical moralistic argument on the scope ...


Coming To Illinois May Mean Loss Of Rights To Decide Under Guardianship, James T. Struck Jan 2009

Coming To Illinois May Mean Loss Of Rights To Decide Under Guardianship, James T. Struck

James T Struck

About 500,000 people die in U.S. nursing homes each year some related to second hand smoke. One Illinois nursing home has staff blow smoke in my face, drive a truck near me, throw parental belongings into the garbage, deny dental and religious services. The nursing home administrator said "you are going to be dead" for expressing concerns with shaking hands, saying I would contact the US attorney about slavery like treatment of disabled persons, requesting that my mother get fresh air from second hand smoke. I have been litigating for over 31 months to visit, phone, take home ...


Coming To Illinois May Mean Loss Of Rights To Decide Under Guardianship, James T. Struck Jan 2009

Coming To Illinois May Mean Loss Of Rights To Decide Under Guardianship, James T. Struck

James T Struck

About 500,000 people die in U.S. nursing homes each year some related to second hand smoke. One Illinois nursing home has staff blow smoke in my face, drive a truck near me, throw parental belongings into the garbage, deny dental and religious services. The nursing home administrator said "you are going to be dead" for expressing concerns with shaking hands, saying I would contact the US attorney about slavery like treatment of disabled persons, requesting that my mother get fresh air from second hand smoke. I have been litigating for over 31 months to visit, phone, take home ...


Latina/Os, Locality, And Law In The Rural South, Lisa R. Pruitt Jan 2009

Latina/Os, Locality, And Law In The Rural South, Lisa R. Pruitt

Lisa R Pruitt

In this era of municipal anti-immigrant ordinances and federal-local cooperation to enforce immigration laws, legal issues associated with immigration are playing out at multiple scales, from the national down to the local. Legal actors at the municipal, county, and state levels have become front-line policymakers and law enforcers in relation to immigrant populations. This essay calls attention to phenomenal surge in Latina/o immigration into the rural South in recent years, and it considers how that socio-spatial milieu may influence these legal matters at the local level.

Among other issues, the essay discusses the enhanced opportunity for racial profiling in ...


A Man’S Right To Choose His Surname In Marriage: A Proposal, Michael Mahoney Frandina Jan 2009

A Man’S Right To Choose His Surname In Marriage: A Proposal, Michael Mahoney Frandina

Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy

[...] a brief history of marital and naming practices will outline how these two concepts have shifted to a primarily private issue today, as compared with the Middle Ages, when they were primarily public issues highly concerned with property matters. [...] naming involves important issues in the construction of one's identity.


Lost In The Maze Of Appeals: The Eleventh Circuit's Review Of Decisions By The Board Of Immigration Appeals, Amy L. Moore Jan 2009

Lost In The Maze Of Appeals: The Eleventh Circuit's Review Of Decisions By The Board Of Immigration Appeals, Amy L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarship

The Eleventh Circuit reviews decisions made by the Board of Immigration Appeals with a very lenient substantial evidence test that incorporates the idea of compulsion. In other words, the record must compel an opposite conclusion for a decision to be overturned as opposed to merely being unsupported by substantial evidence. This article details the job of the Board of Immigration Appeals, the types of claims it hears, and the types of review applied to it by the Eleventh Circuit. A study of 251 cases from 1990 through 2008 suggests that the Eleventh Circuit hardly ever overturns the Board of Immigration ...


Private Immigration Screening In The Workplace, Stephen Lee Jan 2009

Private Immigration Screening In The Workplace, Stephen Lee

Faculty Scholarship

Although public law scholars have long addressed the problems of accountability generated by private decision-making and "privatization," they have largely ignored this phenomenon in the immigration context. Our ignorance is increasingly indefensible. Millions of employers - private parties - are required by law to screen their workers for unauthorized immigrants, and growing evidence suggests that they use their screening power to ignore workplace protections and to otherwise exploit these workers. This article is the first attempt to apply the insights generated by the privatization literature to immigration law. It argues that our nation's employers have emerged as private immigration screeners who ...


Redefining The Rights Of Undocumented Workers, Keith Cunningham-Parmeter Jan 2009

Redefining The Rights Of Undocumented Workers, Keith Cunningham-Parmeter

American University Law Review

Should a nation extend legal rights to those who enter the country illegally? The Supreme Court recently addressed this question when it held that unauthorized immigrants who are fired illegally for unionizing cannot recover monetary remedies. This has led to a significant decline in employment protections for unauthorized immigrants beyond the unionized sector. For example, some courts now question whether unauthorized immigrants can receive full remedies for sexual harassment, workplace discrimination, or on-the-job injuries.

Scholars have criticized these losses but have yet to formulate a coherent framework for evaluating the employment rights of unauthorized immigrants. This article does so by ...


Same-Sex Immigration: Domestication And Homonormativity, Nan Seuffert Jan 2009

Same-Sex Immigration: Domestication And Homonormativity, Nan Seuffert

Faculty of Law - Papers (Archive)

LAW- AND POLICY-MAKERS in New Zealand have taken what might be seen, from a conservative/liberal divide, as two contradictory stances on aspects of border control over the past decade. In one move, they have progressively tightened and whitened immigration policy generally, making the criteria and process for gaining residency more restrictive. At the same time, they have progressively opened the borders in relation to the immigration of same-sex couples, aligning immigration requirements for these couples with those of heterosexual couples. I argue that New Zealand's recent liberalisation of immigration law and policy for gays and lesbians aligns with ...


Recognizing The Problem Of Solidarity: Immigration In The Post-Welfare State, David Abraham Jan 2009

Recognizing The Problem Of Solidarity: Immigration In The Post-Welfare State, David Abraham

Articles

No abstract provided.


Ending The Widow Penalty: Why Are Surviving Alien Spouses Of Deceased Citizens Being Deported?, Jayme A. Feldheim Jan 2009

Ending The Widow Penalty: Why Are Surviving Alien Spouses Of Deceased Citizens Being Deported?, Jayme A. Feldheim

Fordham Law Review

Although our nation generally permits aliens to apply to become lawful permanent residents of this country through their marriages to American citizens, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) automatically denies these applications when the citizen spouse dies within two years of the marriage. Termed the “widow penalty,” certain federal courts have rejected this policy as being both unreasonable and in opposition to the plain meaning of 8 U.S.C. § 1151, the statute which categorizes aliens as immediate relatives of U.S. citizens and thus grants them this opportunity. This conflict between the Agency and the judiciary, in turn ...


Some Suggestions For The Uafa: A Bill For Same-Sex Binational Couples, Timothy R. Carraher Jan 2009

Some Suggestions For The Uafa: A Bill For Same-Sex Binational Couples, Timothy R. Carraher

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


Outsourcing Immigration Compliance, Eleanor Marie Brown Jan 2009

Outsourcing Immigration Compliance, Eleanor Marie Brown

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

Immigration is a hot button issue about which Americans have sent a clear message. They prefer not to admit more aliens until the government is able to credibly screen for entrants who will abide by the terms of admission and sanction those who do not. While immigration debates now focus almost entirely on undocumented workers, they have overshadowed another critical, yet poorly understood challenge: designing institutions to properly screen for aliens who are visa-compliant and sanction non-compliant aliens. Because failed guest worker programs unquestionably increase the size of the undocumented population, this article addresses the difficulty of institutional design by ...


Proportional Deportation, Angela M. Banks Jan 2009

Proportional Deportation, Angela M. Banks

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Outsourcing Immigration Compliance, Eleanor Marie Lawrence Brown Jan 2009

Outsourcing Immigration Compliance, Eleanor Marie Lawrence Brown

Fordham Law Review

Immigration is a hot-button issue about which Americans have sent a clear message. They prefer not to admit more aliens until the government is able to screen credibly for entrants who will abide by the terms of admission and sanction those who do not. While immigration debates now focus almost entirely on undocumented workers, they have overshadowed another critical, yet poorly understood, challenge: designing institutions to screen properly for aliens who are visa-compliant and sanction noncompliant aliens. Because failed guest worker programs unquestionably increase the size of the undocumented population, this Article addresses the difficulty of institutional design by analyzing ...


Regulating Immigration Legal Service Provider: In Adequate Representation And Notario Fraud, Careen Shannon Jan 2009

Regulating Immigration Legal Service Provider: In Adequate Representation And Notario Fraud, Careen Shannon

Fordham Law Review

Immigrants are often easy prey for bogus or incompetent attorneys, "notarios," scam artists, and other bad actors who take advantage of immigrants' limited knowledge of U.S. law, lack of English fluency, and lack of cultural knowledge to charge exorbitant fees for wild promises of green cards and citizenship that the bad actors annot-or in some cases never inteded to-deliver. Such exploitation is merely a symptom, however, of the larger prolem of inadequate access to competent legal counsel by foreign nationals seeking to navigate our labyrinthine scheme of immigration laws, regulations, and policies. ontrary to popular belief, not all of ...


A View From The Immigration Bench, Noel Brennan Jan 2009

A View From The Immigration Bench, Noel Brennan

Fordham Law Review

No abstract provided.


Constitution On Ice: A Report On Immigration Home Raid Operations, Bess Chiu, Lynly Egyes, Peter L. Markowitz, Jaya Vasandani Jan 2009

Constitution On Ice: A Report On Immigration Home Raid Operations, Bess Chiu, Lynly Egyes, Peter L. Markowitz, Jaya Vasandani

Articles

No abstract provided.


From The Chair, Lela P. Love Jan 2009

From The Chair, Lela P. Love

Articles

No abstract provided.


Barriers To Representation For Detained Immigrants Facing Deportation: Varick Street Detention Facility, A Case Study, Peter L. Markowitz Jan 2009

Barriers To Representation For Detained Immigrants Facing Deportation: Varick Street Detention Facility, A Case Study, Peter L. Markowitz

Articles

There is an evolving crisis in the immigration courts and federal courts of appeals caused by the lack of quality representation for immigrants facing deportation. The problem is particularly acute for immigrants who are detained during their removal proceedings. As part of the Study Group on Immigrant Representation (Katzmann study group), the Subcommittee on Enhancing Mechanisms for Service Delivery undertook a case study of the institutional and legal barriers to quality legal representation for immigrants held at the Varick Street Detention Facility in New York City. Through this lens we hope to offer some useful insights into the core factors ...