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Full-Text Articles in Law

Destabilization Rights: How Public Law Litigation Succeeds, Charles F. Sabel, William H. Simon Jan 2004

Destabilization Rights: How Public Law Litigation Succeeds, Charles F. Sabel, William H. Simon

Faculty Scholarship

"Public law litigation" – civil rights advocacy seeking to restructure public agencies - has changed course over the last three decades. It has moved away from remedial intervention modeled on command-and-control bureaucracy toward a kind of intervention that can be called "experimentalist." Instead of top-down, fixed-rule regimes, the experimentalist approach emphasizes ongoing stakeholder negotiation, continuously revised performance measures, and transparency. Experimentalism is evident in all the principal areas of public law intervention – schools, mental health institutions, prisons, police, and public housing. This development has been substantially unanticipated and unnoticed by both advocates and critics of public law litigation. In this Article, we ...


The "Inexorable Zero", Bert I. Huang Jan 2004

The "Inexorable Zero", Bert I. Huang

Faculty Scholarship

[F]ine tuning of the statistics could not have obscured the glaring absence of minority [long-distance] drivers .... [T]he company's inability to rebut the inference of discrimination came not from a misuse of statistics but from "the inexorable zero."

The Supreme Court first uttered the phrase "inexorable zero" a quarter-century ago in International Brotherhood of Teamsters v. United States, a landmark Title VII case. Ever since, this enigmatic name for a rule of inference has echoed across legal argument about segregation, discrimination, and affirmative action. Justice O'Connor, for instance, cited the "inexorable zero" in a major sex discrimination ...


John Ely: The Harvard Years, Henry Paul Monaghan Jan 2004

John Ely: The Harvard Years, Henry Paul Monaghan

Faculty Scholarship

John Ely's life ended too soon, on October 25, a few weeks before his sixty-fifth birthday. Six months earlier, Yale had awarded him an honorary Doctor of Laws. The citation accompanying the award stated, "Your work set the standard for constitutional scholarship for our generation." It is, I believe, particularly appropriate that this Law Review dedicate an issue to John's memory. John taught at Harvard Law School from 1973 to 1982. During that time he produced his signature work, Democracy and Distrust, and the articles most closely associated with his name, several of which appeared in this Review.


Nine Justices, Ten Years: A Statistical Retrospective, Robert J. Jackson Jr., Thiruvendran Vignarajah Jan 2004

Nine Justices, Ten Years: A Statistical Retrospective, Robert J. Jackson Jr., Thiruvendran Vignarajah

Faculty Scholarship

The 2003 Term marked an unprecedented milestone for the Supreme Court: for the first time in history, nine Justices celebrated a full decade presiding together over the nation's highest court.' The continuity of the current Court is especially striking given that, on average, one new Justice has been appointed approximately every two years since the Court's expansion to nine members in 1837.2 Although the Harvard Law Review has prepared statistical retrospectives in the past,3 the last decade presents a rare opportunity to study the Court free from the disruptions of intervening appointments.

Presented here is a ...