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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Future Of Health Care Conscience Laws Post-Dobbs, Nadia N. Sawicki May 2024

The Future Of Health Care Conscience Laws Post-Dobbs, Nadia N. Sawicki

The Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues

The Supreme Court’s rejection of a constitutional right to choose abortion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization has prompted legislatures to make significant changes to state laws. Some states have criminalized abortion in most circumstances, while others have granted patients and health care providers broader rights to choose and access abortion. Another, perhaps less-recognized, avenue for legislative change is by amending existing state conscience laws. This Article describes the avenues state legislatures might take in using conscience laws to impact abortion access in accordance with the state’s policy preferences.


Crisis Of Conscience In Post-Roe America, Elizabeth Sepper May 2024

Crisis Of Conscience In Post-Roe America, Elizabeth Sepper

The Journal of Contemporary Legal Issues

This essay proceeds in four parts. Summarizing my previous writing, Part II explains that since Roe, the law has systematically favored refusing individuals and institutions. This asymmetry was unjustified, because “[c]onscience equally may compel a doctor or nurse to deliver a controversial treatment to a patient in need.” After Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the asymmetry may deepen. In restrictive states, Part III contends, the crisis of conscience for willing providers will increase, even as rights to refusal expand. Part IV identifies several possible complications for the legal framework governing conscience in medicine. It suggests that as …


Symposium: Gender, Health, And The Constitution: Reforming Clinical Trial Pregnancy Exclusions, Jennifer D. Oliva Mar 2024

Symposium: Gender, Health, And The Constitution: Reforming Clinical Trial Pregnancy Exclusions, Jennifer D. Oliva

ConLawNOW

This essay argues the exclusion of pregnant people from drug and biologic clinical trials is paternalistic, unjust, and counterproductive because the failure to include pregnant people in experimental trials can enhance risks to maternal and fetal health. Bioethicists, legal scholars, and other researchers have pleaded for reform in this context for decades. This article describes pregnancy medical drug use and the genesis and evolution of federal regulations and policies that operate to exclude pregnant people from clinical trials. It argues that the implementation of legal reforms that ensure the inclusion of pregnant people in clinical trials is imperative given Covid, …


The Scrivener's Error: How Bankruptcy Judges Overrule Health Experts On Medicare Decisions, Nicolas C. Oehler May 2023

The Scrivener's Error: How Bankruptcy Judges Overrule Health Experts On Medicare Decisions, Nicolas C. Oehler

Akron Law Review

There is a circuit split over the interpretation of 42 U.S.C. § 405(h), which requires providers to exhaust their remedies with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) before proceeding to court. This split originates from a recodification that omitted several jurisdictional grants from § 405(h), leaving courts to decide whether to continue interpreting the statute as Congress intended or begin interpreting the statute’s plain language. Complicating this split, a backlog of claims in HHS’s appeal systems prevents speedy adjudication. This delay leaves providers searching for other adjudicatory options for their Medicare claims, such as bankruptcy courts.

As initially …


Interagency Dynamics In Matters Of Health And Immigration, Medha D. Makhlouf Jan 2023

Interagency Dynamics In Matters Of Health And Immigration, Medha D. Makhlouf

Faculty Scholarly Works

When Congress delegates authority to an executive agency, it tells us something important about the expertise that Congress wishes to harness in policymaking on an issue. In the legal literature on interagency dynamics and cooperation, issues at the nexus of health and immigration are largely understudied. This Article extends this literature by examining how delegations of authority on issues at the intersection of health and immigration influence policymaking. In an analysis of how administrative law models apply to three topics in the shared regulatory space of the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and the Department of Homeland Security …


Medicaid Waivers, Administrative Authority, And The Shadow Of Malingering, Nicole Huberfeld Oct 2021

Medicaid Waivers, Administrative Authority, And The Shadow Of Malingering, Nicole Huberfeld

Faculty Scholarship

From 2018 through 2020, HHS approved state Medicaid demonstration waivers to impose new eligibility conditions such as work requirements, connecting current “personal responsibility” rhetoric and historical suspicion of malingering. The Biden administration reversed course but advocated to the Supreme Court for expansive administrative discretion. This approach supports health equity now but could enable reemergence of restrictive health policies down the road.


Ai For Retrospective Review, Catherine M. Sharkey Apr 2021

Ai For Retrospective Review, Catherine M. Sharkey

Belmont Law Review

No abstract provided.


Hipaa-Phobia Hampers Efforts To Track And Contain Covid-19, Lee Hiromoto M.D., J.D. Jan 2021

Hipaa-Phobia Hampers Efforts To Track And Contain Covid-19, Lee Hiromoto M.D., J.D.

SLU Law Journal Online

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), enacted by the US Congress 1996, laudably protects medical privacy in healthcare settings. However, this federal law has created a culture of fear that limits current efforts to address the COVID-19 pandemic. Healthcare providers, who are covered by HIPAA, may be reluctant to disclose information about outbreak clusters for fear of violating the law. Healthcare organizations, who are also covered by the law, still rely on fax machines to avoid violating HIPAA’s data security requirements. And the scrupulous rule-following in healthcare has given independent life to a HIPAA boogeyman. Thus, officials who …


Mhpaea & Marble Cake: Parity & The Forgotten Frame Of Federalism, Taleed El-Sabawi Apr 2020

Mhpaea & Marble Cake: Parity & The Forgotten Frame Of Federalism, Taleed El-Sabawi

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

No abstract provided.


Covid-19 And Lgbt Rights, Suzanne B. Goldberg Jan 2020

Covid-19 And Lgbt Rights, Suzanne B. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

Even in the best of times, LGBT individuals have legal vulnerabilities in employment, housing, healthcare and other domains resulting from a combination of persistent bias and uneven protection against discrimination. In this time of COVID-19, these vulnerabilities combine to amplify both the legal and health risks that LGBT people face.

This essay focuses on several risks that are particularly linked to being lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender, with the recognition that these vulnerabilities are often intensified by discrimination based on race, ethnicity, age, disability, immigration status and other aspects of identity. Topics include: 1) federal withdrawal of antidiscrimination protections; 2) …


The Federalism Challenges Of Protecting Medical Privacy In Workers' Compensation, Ani B. Satz Oct 2019

The Federalism Challenges Of Protecting Medical Privacy In Workers' Compensation, Ani B. Satz

Indiana Law Journal

Under current law, injured workers face a Hobson’s choice: They may file for workers’ compensation or maintain their medical privacy. The reason for this is that § 164.512(l) of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s Privacy Rule (HPR) is widely misinterpreted by courts and legislatures as a wholesale waiver of privacy protections for injured workers. Section 164.512(l) excludes workers’ compensation from federal privacy protections that may frustrate the efficient administration of workers’ compensation claims. As the history and intent behind the HPR indicate, § 164.512(l) is premised on the assumption that states will protect workers’ privacy by creating and …


A Perfect Storm: Religion, Sex, And Administrative Law, Helen M. Alvare May 2019

A Perfect Storm: Religion, Sex, And Administrative Law, Helen M. Alvare

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

In order to propose a way forward toward better sexual and reproductive health regulation, which also avoids undercutting or crossing swords with religion, this Article will proceed as follows: Part I will paint with a broad brush the current state of sexual and reproductive health problems in the United States, focusing a bit upon younger Americans to whom SRA programs are addressed. It will highlight disparities according to race and socioeconomic conditions when these obtain. These are troubling on their face, but particularly troubling today at a time of perceived heightened racial and socioeconomic class tension in the United …


Teaching The Hipaa Privacy Rule, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2017

Teaching The Hipaa Privacy Rule, Stacey A. Tovino

Scholarly Works

Twenty years ago, President Clinton signed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) into law. Over the past two decades, the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has published several sets of rules implementing the Administrative Simplification provisions within HIPAA as well as the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical (HITECH) Act within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). These rules include, but certainly are not limited to, a final rule published on January 25, 2013, governing the use and disclosure of protected health information by covered entities and their business associates (the …


King V. Burwell: The Supreme Court's Missed Opportunity To Cure What Ails Chevron, Vanessa L. Johnson, Marisa Finley, J. James Rohack Jan 2016

King V. Burwell: The Supreme Court's Missed Opportunity To Cure What Ails Chevron, Vanessa L. Johnson, Marisa Finley, J. James Rohack

Journal of Legislation

The article outlines the construct of the ACA’s premium assistance tax credits, explores the legal controversies surrounding these subsidies, uses the tax subsidies cases to demonstrate the flaws in the Chevron framework, and argues that the Supreme Court should have framed its King v. Burwell analysis in a way that would have cured, rather than ignored, the ails of Chevron.


Regulating Healthcare Robots: Maximizing Opportunities While Minimizing Risks, Drew Simshaw, Nicolas Terry, Kris Hauser, M.L. Cummings Jan 2016

Regulating Healthcare Robots: Maximizing Opportunities While Minimizing Risks, Drew Simshaw, Nicolas Terry, Kris Hauser, M.L. Cummings

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

Some of the most dynamic areas of robotics research and development today are healthcare applications. Robot-assisted surgery, robotic nurses, in-home rehabilitation, and eldercare robots' are all demonstrating rapidly iterating innovation. Rising healthcare labor costs and an aging population will increase demand for these human surrogates and enhancements. However, like many emerging technologies, robots are difficult to place within existing regulatory frameworks. For example, the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) seeks to ensure that medical devices (few of which are consumer devices) are safe, the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules apply to data collected by health care providers …


Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy Jan 2016

Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy

Brooklyn Law Review

Home care for the elderly and disabled is a rapidly expanding industry in which structural and regulatory factors contribute to worker vulnerability and exploitation. Systemic exclusion from core federal employment and labor laws, as well as many state and local regulations, results in minimal consequences for employers who violate standards. Despite recent movement at the federal level to create a “new mindset” of rights and regulations, home care workers must be equipped with creative ways to enforce these new rights and to challenge existing gaps in enforcement. With the understanding that two-thirds of the home care industry is financed by …


Collecting New Data On Disability Health Inequities, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2016

Collecting New Data On Disability Health Inequities, Elizabeth Pendo

All Faculty Scholarship

Prior to the Affordable Care Act, disability was marginalized in data collection efforts, limiting our ability to understand and address significant health inequities experienced by millions of Americans. Now, for the first time, we can use these tools to collect valuable new data on the nature and extent of health inequities experienced by people with disabilities across the country.

This article argues that standardized health collection data is critical to health equity, and because of the ACA’s groundbreaking requirements for data collection of disability status and treatment of patients with disabilities, we now have the potential to identify, track, and …


Can I Call You Back? A Sustained Interaction With Biospecimen Donors To Facilitate Advances In Research, Jonathan S. Miller Jan 2015

Can I Call You Back? A Sustained Interaction With Biospecimen Donors To Facilitate Advances In Research, Jonathan S. Miller

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

"For the cure." This statement resonates throughout society and offers a simple reasoning for the conduct of biomedical research. It provides a strong impetus for advocates of biomedical research to pursue appropriations to support research hypotheses, advanced medical technologies, and targeted therapeutic strategies. Answering sophisticated medical questions, however, requires researchers and clinicians to have an adequate supply of materials necessary to facilitate their research endeavors. These materials-commonly referred to as biospecimens- may include frozen human embryos, tissue specimens, blood samples, buccal swabs, or exhaled breath condensate, all of which may be collected and stored in biobanks.


Is Too Much Privacy Bad For Your Health? An Introduction To The Law, Ethics, And Hipaa Rule On Medical Privacy, Charity Scott Oct 2014

Is Too Much Privacy Bad For Your Health? An Introduction To The Law, Ethics, And Hipaa Rule On Medical Privacy, Charity Scott

Charity Scott

No abstract provided.


Rick Garnett Publishes Op-Ed Piece In La Times "The Righteousness In Hobby Lobby's Cause", Richard Garnett Dec 2013

Rick Garnett Publishes Op-Ed Piece In La Times "The Righteousness In Hobby Lobby's Cause", Richard Garnett

Richard W Garnett

Rick Garnett's op-ed in LA Times on the HHS mandate and religious liberty cases before the Supreme Court.


A "Common" Proposal, Stacey A. Tovino Jan 2013

A "Common" Proposal, Stacey A. Tovino

Scholarly Works

The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (the “Common Rule”) is codified in separate regulations by seventeen federal departments and agencies, including the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). HHS’s version of the Common Rule currently contains a basic policy for the protection of all human subjects, codified at Subpart A of the Common Rule, as well as special provisions governing human subjects research involving three sets of vulnerable populations, including pregnant women, fetuses, and neonates (Subpart B); prisoners (Subpart C); and children (Subpart D). This Article proposes that HHS amend the Common Rule to add a …


Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld Jan 2013

Where There Is A Right, There Must Be A Remedy (Even In Medicaid), Nicole Huberfeld

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This Article will explore the power struggle that Medicaid invites and its potential elevation due to the pressures that will follow the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) expansion. Part I of this Article will describe the three phases of private enforcement litigation and how they have affected Medicaid reimbursement rates. This Part also will highlight the deceptive stability that has taken root in the lower federal courts by describing the recent state attempts to end private enforcement actions. The first Part will conclude by briefly considering the nature of the federalism arguments that states are making. Part II …


The Policy Against Federal Funding For Abortions Extends Into The Realm Of Free Speech After Rust V. Sullivan, Loye M. Barton Nov 2012

The Policy Against Federal Funding For Abortions Extends Into The Realm Of Free Speech After Rust V. Sullivan, Loye M. Barton

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Right To No Meaningful Review: The Aftermath Of Shalala V. Illinois Council On Long Term Care, Inc., Ruqaiijah Ayanna Yearby Mar 2005

A Right To No Meaningful Review: The Aftermath Of Shalala V. Illinois Council On Long Term Care, Inc., Ruqaiijah Ayanna Yearby

ExpressO

A RIGHT TO NO MEANINGFUL REVIEW: THE AFTERMATH OF SHALALA v. ILLINOIS COUNCIL ON LONG TERM CARE, INC. Ruqaiijah A. Yearby

The Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment has been perverted in the federal administrative system. Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), regularly deprive individuals of liberty and property with little to no review. In its regulation of the health care industry through the Medicare program, HHS often turns a blind eye to procedural Due Process protections, such as providing individuals an opportunity to challenge the deprivation of property at a hearing, …


The Use Of Placebos In Clinical Trials: Responsible Research Or Unethical Practice?, Sharona Hoffman Jan 2001

The Use Of Placebos In Clinical Trials: Responsible Research Or Unethical Practice?, Sharona Hoffman

Faculty Publications

Developments in medical research have been occurring at a rapidly increasing rate during the past two decades. Expanding budgets, augmented computer capabilities, and new research tools have all dramatically enhanced research technology. Accompanying the proliferation of medical research are increasing concerns about research risks. This article focuses on placebo-controlled clinical trials. The use of placebos enables clinical investigators to compare results from subjects taking an experimental intervention to results from a group that is receiving an inactive substance, such as a sugar pill, in order to determine the efficacy of the new medication. In recent years, some surgeons have also …


Is Too Much Privacy Bad For Your Health? An Introduction To The Law, Ethics, And Hipaa Rule On Medical Privacy, Charity Scott Dec 2000

Is Too Much Privacy Bad For Your Health? An Introduction To The Law, Ethics, And Hipaa Rule On Medical Privacy, Charity Scott

Georgia State University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Give Use Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses . . . Except When They Have Hiv: An Analysis Of Current United States Immigration Policy Regarding Hiv-Positive Aliens In Light Of Guantanamo Bay, Jason W. Konvicka Jan 1993

Give Use Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses . . . Except When They Have Hiv: An Analysis Of Current United States Immigration Policy Regarding Hiv-Positive Aliens In Light Of Guantanamo Bay, Jason W. Konvicka

University of Richmond Law Review

On September 30, 1991, a party of military leaders overthrew the first democratically elected government in Haitian history. Although Haiti's former president, Jean Bertrand Aristide escaped to safety, many of his supporters were not so fortunate. Numerous Haitians were tortured and killed due to their political affiliation. Fearing similar persecution, thousands of Haitian nationals abandoned their belongings and fled to the high seas in an attempt to reach the United States. Soon thereafter, the United States Coast Guard began interdicting an increasing number of Haitian boats as they made their way into international waters.


Government Nonacquiescence Case In Point: Social Security Litigation Jan 1986

Government Nonacquiescence Case In Point: Social Security Litigation

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


In Virto Fertilization: Hope For Childless Couples Breeds Legal Exposure For Physicians, Margaret I. Lane, Susan Cross Bolton, Rose M. Alexander Jan 1983

In Virto Fertilization: Hope For Childless Couples Breeds Legal Exposure For Physicians, Margaret I. Lane, Susan Cross Bolton, Rose M. Alexander

University of Richmond Law Review

The recent successes with in vitro or extracorporeal fertilization ("IVF") in both England" and the United States have led to increased interest in this new medical technique. For a large number of women, IVF represents the most promising opportunity for reproduction. This breakthrough makes it possible for infertile couples to experience for the first time the joys of natural parenthood that fertile or "normal" couples take for granted. Pioneers in the field are therefore to be commended for their work. Unfortunately, like other innovative medical services, the IVF procedures also breed legal concerns which will demand resolution in the not-so-distant …