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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

From Nucleotides To Nuanced Law: The Value Of An Incremental Approach To Experimentation In State-Level Genetic Anti-Discrimination Legislation, Katelyn Fisher Jun 2021

From Nucleotides To Nuanced Law: The Value Of An Incremental Approach To Experimentation In State-Level Genetic Anti-Discrimination Legislation, Katelyn Fisher

University of Massachusetts Law Review

A person’s genetic information tells a detailed story of what someone looks like, who her relatives are, and even what illnesses she may develop. This information, as enlightening as it may be, can be especially damaging when utilized in a discriminatory way. This Note explores how the protections under the Genetic Non Discrimination Act of 2008 will no longer be sufficient for protecting individuals from genetic discrimination as the use of genetic information becomes more commonplace. The questions become: Where do we start? How and where should protections that extend to circumstances not covered by GINA be created in ...


Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing: Maintenance Of Individual Privacy, Jessica L. Missel Jan 2020

Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing: Maintenance Of Individual Privacy, Jessica L. Missel

Health Law Outlook

No abstract provided.


Permitted Incentives For Workplace Wellness Plans Under The Ada And Gina: The Regulatory Gap, Elizabeth Pendo, Brandon Hall Jan 2019

Permitted Incentives For Workplace Wellness Plans Under The Ada And Gina: The Regulatory Gap, Elizabeth Pendo, Brandon Hall

All Faculty Scholarship

Although workplace wellness plans have been around for decades, they have flourished under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”) into a $6 billion-dollar industry. Under PPACA, a “wellness plan” is a program of health promotion or disease prevention offered by an employer that is designed to promote health or prevent disease and which meets the other applicable requirements of that subsection. Employers look to these programs to promote healthy lifestyles, improve the overall health of employees and beneficiaries, and reduce rising healthcare costs. PPACA’s amendments to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) permit employers to ...


Gina, Big Data, And The Future Of Employee Privacy, Brad Areheart Jan 2019

Gina, Big Data, And The Future Of Employee Privacy, Brad Areheart

UTK Law Faculty Publications

Threats to privacy abound in modern society, but individuals currently enjoy little meaningful legal protection for their privacy interests. We argue that the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) offers a blueprint for preventing employers from breaching employee privacy. GINA has faced significant criticism since its enactment in 2008: commentators have dismissed the law as ill-conceived, unnecessary, and ineffective. While we concede that GINA may have failed to alleviate anxieties about medical genetic testing, we assert that it has unappreciated value as an employee-privacy statute. In the era of big data, protections for employee privacy are more pressing than protections against ...


Privacy Of Information And Dna Testing Kits, Shanna Raye Mason Jan 2018

Privacy Of Information And Dna Testing Kits, Shanna Raye Mason

Catholic University Journal of Law and Technology

In modern times, consumers desire for more control over their own health and healthcare. With this growing interest of control, direct to consumer DNA testing kits have never been more popular. However, many consumers are unaware of the potential privacy concerns associated with such use. This comment examines the popularity and privacy risks that are likely unknown to the individual consumer. This comment also addresses the shortcomings of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), as well as the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) in regard to protecting individual’s genetic information from misuse. This ...


Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra Jun 2016

Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra

Pepperdine Law Review

Imagine applying for a job, and as part of your application process, your prospective employer asks for a photograph. You, as an eager candidate, comply with the request and, unbeknownst to you, the employer runs your picture through a software program that scans you for any common genetic diseases and that estimates your longevity. Alas, your face indicates that you may die young. No job for you. Although this sounds like science fiction, we may not be that far off from this scenario. In June 2014, scientists from Oxford reported that they have developed a facial recognition program that uses ...


Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye Mar 2016

Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye

David Kaye

In August 2009, the Board of Trustees of the University of Akron added to the university's employment policy the following proviso: "any applicant may be asked to submit fingerprints or DNA sample for purpose of a federal criminal background check." Although the federal government does not do background checks with DNA, the policy is significant because it highlights a largely unexplored feature of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). GINA generally prohibits employers from asking for "genetic information." The faculty senate and outside commentators have declared that the Akron policy is "of doubtful legality" because it "appears ...


Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra Jan 2016

Use Of Facial Recognition Technology For Medical Purposes: Balancing Privacy With Innovation, Seema Mohapatra

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Whose Genome Is It Anyway?: Re-Identification And Privacy Protection In Public And Participatory Genomics, Sejin Ahn Sep 2015

Whose Genome Is It Anyway?: Re-Identification And Privacy Protection In Public And Participatory Genomics, Sejin Ahn

San Diego Law Review

This Comment advocates for a comprehensive solution to achieve the balance between privacy rights and availability of information. In particular, a strong ban on malicious re-identification and broader anti-discrimination and privacy legislation are necessary to ensure the participants' privacy protection and encourage participation in genomics projects. In addition, the scientific community should establish data standards that can aid in implementation of protective measures to minimize privacy violations. Part II provides an overview of recent developments in genomic technologies and public and participatory genomics. Part III summarizes the privacy issues present in public genomics. Part IV reviews current legislation on genetic ...


Age Of An Information Revolution: The Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Industry And The Need For A Holistic Regulatory Approach, Michelle D. Irick Feb 2012

Age Of An Information Revolution: The Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Testing Industry And The Need For A Holistic Regulatory Approach, Michelle D. Irick

San Diego Law Review

In order to safeguard consumers and ensure the continued progress of a fledgling industry, determining how to interpret results and communicate them with consumers poses one of the most challenging and important tasks. In discussing the challenges the law faces in this area, this Comment will discuss: (1) consumer interfacing issues, such as in advertising and results analysis, faced by the genetic testing industry; (2) the methods DTC companies use in arriving at results and corresponding problems; (3) who may interpret and communicate results; (4) how the DTC genetic testing industry's activities relate to the claims made regarding test ...


The Anticlassification Turn In Employment Discrimination Law, Brad Areheart Dec 2011

The Anticlassification Turn In Employment Discrimination Law, Brad Areheart

Bradley A. Areheart

The distinction between antisubordination and anticlassification has existed since the 1970s and has been frequently invoked by scholars to advocate for certain readings of antidiscrimination law. The anticlassification principle prohibits practices that classify people on the basis of a forbidden category. In contrast, the antisubordination principle allows classification (or consideration of, for example, race or sex) to the extent the classification is intended to challenge group subordination.

While most scholars writing about antisubordination and anticlassification have done so in the context of equal protection, this Article systematically applies antisubordination and anticlassification values to assess recent developments in employment discrimination law ...


They Aren't Who We Thought They Were: The Importance Of Genetic Testing In Major League Baseball To Prevent The Falsification Of Players' Ages, Laurie C. Frey Jan 2010

They Aren't Who We Thought They Were: The Importance Of Genetic Testing In Major League Baseball To Prevent The Falsification Of Players' Ages, Laurie C. Frey

Marquette Sports Law Review

No abstract provided.


Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye Jan 2010

Gina's Genotypes, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

In August 2009, the Board of Trustees of the University of Akron added to the university's employment policy the following proviso: "any applicant may be asked to submit fingerprints or DNA sample for purpose of a federal criminal background check." Although the federal government does not do background checks with DNA, the policy is significant because it highlights a largely unexplored feature of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). GINA generally prohibits employers from asking for "genetic information." The faculty senate and outside commentators have declared that the Akron policy is "of doubtful legality" because it "appears ...


Race, Sex And Genes At Work: Uncovering The Lessons Of Norman-Bloodsaw, Elizabeth Pendo Jan 2010

Race, Sex And Genes At Work: Uncovering The Lessons Of Norman-Bloodsaw, Elizabeth Pendo

All Faculty Scholarship

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (“GINA”) is the first federal, uniform protection against the use of genetic information in both the workplace and health insurance. Signed into law on May 21, 2008, GINA prohibits an employer or health insurer from acquiring or using an individual’s genetic information, with some exceptions. One of the goals of GINA is to eradicate actual, or perceived, discrimination based on genetic information in the workplace and in health insurance. Although the threat of genetic discrimination is often discussed in universal terms - as something that could happen to any of us - the use ...


The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act: A New Look At An Old Problem, Sagit Ziskind Feb 2009

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act: A New Look At An Old Problem, Sagit Ziskind

Sagit Ziskind

Following more than a decade of congressional and academic debate, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was signed into law. GINA forbids health insurers from making coverage determinations based on genetic information from a broad range of sources. GINA has put an end to a patchwork of inconsistent state and federal laws regulating the use of genetic information by the health insurance industry. This essay offers a new framework for understanding the merits of GINA and the appropriateness of its scope. Drawing on economic rationales, this essay shows that genetics legislation pre-GINA failed to adequately advance the principle ...


The Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act: Protecting Privacy And Ensuring Fairness In Health Insurance And Employment Practices, Melissa Beyer Jan 2009

The Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act: Protecting Privacy And Ensuring Fairness In Health Insurance And Employment Practices, Melissa Beyer

Louis Jackson National Student Writing Competition

Almost two centuries ago, Thomas Jefferson, one of this country’s foremost scientists and original thinkers, wrote, ‘[L]aws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As . . . new discoveries are made [and] new truths disclosed...institutions must advance also, and keep pace with the time.’ In this age of genetic breakthroughs, it is essential that our laws catch up with science. We can’t afford to take one step forward in science but two steps backward in civil rights. Our laws must specify, clearly and unambiguously, how genetic information may be used and ...