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Freedom of speech

2012

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Articles 1 - 30 of 74

Full-Text Articles in Law

Appellate Division, First Department - Parkhouse V. Stringer, Alyssa Dunn Dec 2012

Appellate Division, First Department - Parkhouse V. Stringer, Alyssa Dunn

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Talking Chalk: Talking Chalk: Defacing The First Amendment In The Public Forum, Marie A. Failinger Dec 2012

Talking Chalk: Talking Chalk: Defacing The First Amendment In The Public Forum, Marie A. Failinger

Marie A. Failinger

Over the past few years, protesters have been arrested for chalking messages on public forum sidewalks. This article discusses why such arrests are discriminatory and violate the jurisprudence of, and values behind, the Speech Clause


Building The House On A Weak Foundation: Edenfield V. Fane And The Current State Of The Commercial Speech Doctrine, Dennis William Bishop Nov 2012

Building The House On A Weak Foundation: Edenfield V. Fane And The Current State Of The Commercial Speech Doctrine, Dennis William Bishop

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


A First Amendment Exception To The "Collateral Bar" Rule: Protecting Freedom Of Expression And The Legitimacy Of Courts, Richard Labunski Nov 2012

A First Amendment Exception To The "Collateral Bar" Rule: Protecting Freedom Of Expression And The Legitimacy Of Courts, Richard Labunski

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


To Drink The Cup Of Fury: Funeral Picketing, Public Discourse And The First Amendment, Steven J. Heyman Nov 2012

To Drink The Cup Of Fury: Funeral Picketing, Public Discourse And The First Amendment, Steven J. Heyman

All Faculty Scholarship

In Snyder v. Phelps, the Supreme Court held that the Westboro Baptist Church had a First Amendment right to picket the funeral of a young soldier killed in Iraq. This decision reinforces a position that has become increasingly prevalent in First Amendment jurisprudence – the view that the state may not regulate public discourse to protect individuals from emotional or dignitary injury. In this Article, I argue that this view is deeply problematic for two reasons: it unduly sacrifices the value of individual personality and it tends to undermine the sphere of public discourse itself by negating the practical and …


Funding Conditions And Free Speech For Hiv/Aids Ngos: He Who Pays The Piper Cannot Always Call The Tune, Alexander P. Wentworth-Ping Nov 2012

Funding Conditions And Free Speech For Hiv/Aids Ngos: He Who Pays The Piper Cannot Always Call The Tune, Alexander P. Wentworth-Ping

Fordham Law Review

The United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act pledges billions of dollars to fund NGOs combating the HIV/AIDS epidemic but requires recipients to adopt a policy explicitly opposing prostitution and sex trafficking. A possible recipient NGO confronts a tough decision: adopt an affirmative statement against prostitution and sex trafficking to accept the funds, alienating a vital partner in its efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS; or deny the funds to speak its own message, though without the benefit of government assistance.

Courts are split on whether the Leadership Act’s policy requirement places an unconstitutional condition on federal funds that requires …


To Drink The Cup Of Fury: Funeral Picketing, Public Discourse And The First Amendment, Steven J. Heyman Oct 2012

To Drink The Cup Of Fury: Funeral Picketing, Public Discourse And The First Amendment, Steven J. Heyman

Steven J. Heyman

In Snyder v. Phelps, the Supreme Court held that the Westboro Baptist Church had a First Amendment right to picket the funeral of a young soldier killed in Iraq. This decision reinforces a position that has become increasingly prevalent in First Amendment jurisprudence – the view that the state may not regulate public discourse to protect individuals from emotional or dignitary injury. In this Article, I argue that this view is deeply problematic for two reasons: it unduly sacrifices the value of individual personality and it tends to undermine the sphere of public discourse itself by negating the practical and …


The Fourth Estate And The Third Level: Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. V. Federal Communications Commission—Cable Television And Intermediate Scrutiny, R. Stuart Phillips Oct 2012

The Fourth Estate And The Third Level: Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. V. Federal Communications Commission—Cable Television And Intermediate Scrutiny, R. Stuart Phillips

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Madsen V. Women's Health Center, Inc.: Striking An Unequal Balance Between The Right Of Women To Obtain An Abortion And The Right Of Pro-Life Groups To Freedom Of Expression, Keli N. Osaki Oct 2012

Madsen V. Women's Health Center, Inc.: Striking An Unequal Balance Between The Right Of Women To Obtain An Abortion And The Right Of Pro-Life Groups To Freedom Of Expression, Keli N. Osaki

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


"Riding With The Cops And Cheering For The Robbers:" Employee Speech, Doctrinal Cubbyholes, And The Duty Of Loyalty, Marvin F. Hill Jr., James A. Wright Oct 2012

"Riding With The Cops And Cheering For The Robbers:" Employee Speech, Doctrinal Cubbyholes, And The Duty Of Loyalty, Marvin F. Hill Jr., James A. Wright

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Meiklejohn, Monica, & Mutilation Of The Thinking Process, Clay Calvert Oct 2012

Meiklejohn, Monica, & Mutilation Of The Thinking Process, Clay Calvert

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Televised Political Debates And Arkansas Educational Television Commission V. Forbes: Excluding The Public From Public Broadcasting, Joshua Dale Oct 2012

Televised Political Debates And Arkansas Educational Television Commission V. Forbes: Excluding The Public From Public Broadcasting, Joshua Dale

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Gazing Into The Future: The 100-Year Legacy Of Justice William J. Brennan, Stephen J. Wermiel Oct 2012

Gazing Into The Future: The 100-Year Legacy Of Justice William J. Brennan, Stephen J. Wermiel

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


The 2011-2012 Supreme Court Term: Decisions In Constitutional Law, Wilson Huhn Oct 2012

The 2011-2012 Supreme Court Term: Decisions In Constitutional Law, Wilson Huhn

Akron Law Faculty Publications

This presentation reviews the principal decisions of the Supreme Court in the field of Constitutional Law during the 2011-2012 Term of Court. The presentation primarily focuses on the Court's decisions involving the Arizona immigration law (SB 1070), the federal Stolen Valor Act, the "ministerial exception" to the anti-discrimination laws, and above all the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.


The 2011-2012 Supreme Court Term: Decisions In Constitutional Law, Wilson Huhn Oct 2012

The 2011-2012 Supreme Court Term: Decisions In Constitutional Law, Wilson Huhn

Wilson R. Huhn

This presentation reviews the principal decisions of the Supreme Court in the field of Constitutional Law during the 2011-2012 Term of Court. The presentation primarily focuses on the Court's decisions involving the Arizona immigration law (SB 1070), the federal Stolen Valor Act, the "ministerial exception" to the anti-discrimination laws, and above all the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.


Constitutional Combat: Is Fighting A Form Of Free Speech? The Ultimate Fighting Championship And Its Struggle Against The State Of New York Over The Message Of Mixed Martial Arts, Daniel A. Berger Sep 2012

Constitutional Combat: Is Fighting A Form Of Free Speech? The Ultimate Fighting Championship And Its Struggle Against The State Of New York Over The Message Of Mixed Martial Arts, Daniel A. Berger

Daniel A Berger

No abstract provided.


Environmental Aesthetics And Free Speech: Toward A Consistent Content Neutrality Standard For Outdoor Sign Regulation , Brian J. Connolly Sep 2012

Environmental Aesthetics And Free Speech: Toward A Consistent Content Neutrality Standard For Outdoor Sign Regulation , Brian J. Connolly

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

First Amendment challenges by billboard companies and other sign owners to local sign regulations have become a frequent occurrence in the past thirty years. The stakes are high for both commercial sign owners and local governments. Sign control has emerged as an important front in the environmental protection movement, as it focuses on the visual or scenic quality of the environment. Courts have begun to recognize and accept local governments’ interest in controlling the proliferation of signage as part of their efforts to improve environmental quality, but courts have applied First Amendment doctrine in an inconsistent manner. The courts’ inconsistent …


Baker's Autonomy Theory Of Free Speech, Anne Marie Lofaso Sep 2012

Baker's Autonomy Theory Of Free Speech, Anne Marie Lofaso

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Bakerian Response To Weinstein's Free Speech Theory, Anne Marie Lofaso Sep 2012

A Bakerian Response To Weinstein's Free Speech Theory, Anne Marie Lofaso

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Law—First Amendment And Freedom Of Speech—The Constitutionality Of Arkansas’S Prohibition On Political Robocalls, Caleb J. Norris Jul 2012

Constitutional Law—First Amendment And Freedom Of Speech—The Constitutionality Of Arkansas’S Prohibition On Political Robocalls, Caleb J. Norris

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

The note first discusses the pros and cons of robocalls, concluding that certain restrictions on robocalls are desirable. Next, the note examines current constitutional case law governing the issue. Thereafter, the note illustrates how Arkansas's regulation on political robocalls would fail a First Amendment challenge as currently written. Accordingly, the note proposes a revision to the robocall statute that would most likely allow it to pass constitutional review.

The note concludes that the burdens resulting from robocalls are placed upon robocall recipients, opposing political campaigns (especially those that determine not to use them under current law), and unrelated third parties. …


How Not To Criminalize Cyberbullying, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, Andrea Garcia Jul 2012

How Not To Criminalize Cyberbullying, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, Andrea Garcia

UF Law Faculty Publications

This essay provides a sustained constitutional critique of the growing body of laws criminalizing cyberbullying. These laws typically proceed by either modernizing existing harassment and stalking laws or crafting new criminal offenses. Both paths are beset with First Amendment perils, which this essay illustrates through 'case studies' of selected legislative efforts. Though sympathetic to the aims of these new laws, this essay contends that reflexive criminalization in response to tragic cyberbullying incidents has led law-makers to conflate cyberbullying as a social problem with cyberbullying as a criminal problem, creating pernicious consequences. The legislative zeal to eradicate cyberbullying potentially produces disproportionate …


First Amendment Protection For Union Appeals To Consumers, Michael C. Harper Jul 2012

First Amendment Protection For Union Appeals To Consumers, Michael C. Harper

Faculty Scholarship

This article explains why decisions of the National Labor Relations Board under President Obama holding non-picketing secondary appeals to consumers not to be illegal under the National Labor Relations Act were necessary under a 1988 decision of the Supreme Court, Edward J. DeBartolo Corp. v. Florida Gulf Coast Building & Construction Trades Council. The article also explains why both the Supreme Court decision and the Board’s recent decisions were compelled by the first amendment and could not be based on the language of § 8(b)(4)(ii)(B) of the National Labor Relations Act as interpreted by the Court in other cases. The …


New Technologies And Constitutional Law, Thomas Fetzer, Christopher S. Yoo Jun 2012

New Technologies And Constitutional Law, Thomas Fetzer, Christopher S. Yoo

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Of Speech And Sanctions: Toward A Penalty-Sensitive Approach To The First Amendment, Michael Coenen Jun 2012

Of Speech And Sanctions: Toward A Penalty-Sensitive Approach To The First Amendment, Michael Coenen

Journal Articles

Courts confronting First Amendment claims do not often scrutinize the severity of a speaker’s punishment. Embracing a “penalty-neutral” understanding of the free-speech right, these courts tend to treat an individual’s expression as either protected, in which case the government may not punish it at all, or unprotected, in which case the government may punish it to a very great degree. There is, however, a small but important body of “penalty-sensitive” case law that runs counter to the penalty-neutral norm. Within this case law, the severity of a speaker’s punishment affects the merits of her First Amendment claim, thus giving rise …


Electronic Privacy And Employee Speech, Pauline T. Kim Jun 2012

Electronic Privacy And Employee Speech, Pauline T. Kim

Chicago-Kent Law Review

The boundary between work and private life is blurring as a result of changes in the organization of work and advances in technology. Current privacy law is ill-equipped to address these changes and as a result, employees' privacy in their electronic communications is only weakly protected from employer scrutiny. At the same time, the law increasingly protects certain socially valued forms of employee speech. In particular, collective speech, speech that enforces workplace regulations and speech that deters or reports employer wrong-doing are explicitly protected by law from employer reprisals. These two developments—weak protection of employee privacy and increased protection for …


Judicial Line-Drawing And The Broader Culture: The Case Of Politics And Entertainment, R. George Wright Jun 2012

Judicial Line-Drawing And The Broader Culture: The Case Of Politics And Entertainment, R. George Wright

San Diego Law Review

This article puts in a broader legal and cultural context and critically evaluates Justice Scalia's reluctance to distinguish politics from entertainment or, more precisely, political speech from entertainment speech. Some may think of Justice Scalia's reluctance as the embodiment of judicial modesty or realistic practical wisdom. Others may think of it as an unnecessary expression of relativism or subjectivism that is ominous in its implications. Either way, whether we can appropriately distinguish between entertainment speech and political speech, and then apply appropriately different free speech standards in each case, says much about our status and priorities as a culture. Placing …


How Not To Criminalize Cyberbullying, Lyrissa Lidsky, Andrea Pinzon Garcia Jun 2012

How Not To Criminalize Cyberbullying, Lyrissa Lidsky, Andrea Pinzon Garcia

Missouri Law Review

This essay provides a sustained constitutional critique of the growing body of laws criminalizing cyberbullying. These laws typically proceed by either modernizing existing harassment and stalking laws or crafting new criminal offenses. Both paths are beset with First Amendment perils, which this essay illustrates through 'case studies' of selected legislative efforts. Though sympathetic to the aims of these new laws, this essay contends that reflexive criminalization in response to tragic cyberbullying incidents has led law-makers to conflate cyberbullying as a social problem with cyberbullying as a criminal problem, creating pernicious consequences. The legislative zeal to eradicate cyberbullying potentially produces disproportionate …


Freedom Of Speech And The ‘Occupy’ Protests: ‘Narrowly Tailored To Further Significant Government Interests’, Mel Cousins May 2012

Freedom Of Speech And The ‘Occupy’ Protests: ‘Narrowly Tailored To Further Significant Government Interests’, Mel Cousins

Mel Cousins

This note examines the spate of recent court decisions concerning efforts by Occupy protestors in various cities of the USA to prevent the removal (or restriction) of their protests. In general, though by no means in all cases, the courts, applying existing freedom of speech principles, have upheld the protestors’ right to protest to some extent but have placed narrow limits around the manner in which this right may be exercised. Following a short introduction (Part 1), Part 2 discuses the approach which has been taken by the courts in recent cases. The approach adopted contrasts sharply with the Supreme …


Corporate Criticism On The Internet: The Fine Line Between Anonymous Speech And Cybersmear, Scot Wilson May 2012

Corporate Criticism On The Internet: The Fine Line Between Anonymous Speech And Cybersmear, Scot Wilson

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Ashcroft V. Free Speech Coalition: How Can Virtual Child Pornography Be Banned Under The First Amendment?, Virginia F. Milstead Apr 2012

Ashcroft V. Free Speech Coalition: How Can Virtual Child Pornography Be Banned Under The First Amendment?, Virginia F. Milstead

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.