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Freedom of speech

University of Michigan Law School

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

1999

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Consensual Relationships And The Constitution: A Case Of Liberty Denied, Gary E. Elliot Jan 1999

Consensual Relationships And The Constitution: A Case Of Liberty Denied, Gary E. Elliot

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

On many university and college campuses, there exists an anti-civil-libertarian spirit reminiscent of the McCarthy period. During the 1940s and early 1950s, regents, trustees, academic administrations, and the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), although each for a different reason, persuaded the Academy to repress personal liberty. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely when constitutionally and statutorily protected liberties and rights became secondary to insulating educational institutions from damage suits in their pursuit of a selective social and political agenda.


The Triumph Of Hate Speech Regulation: Why Gender Wins But Race Loses In America, Jon Gould Jan 1999

The Triumph Of Hate Speech Regulation: Why Gender Wins But Race Loses In America, Jon Gould

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

On March 30, 1995, newspaper headlines declared that hate speech regulations were dead. After six years of litigating over university hate speech codes, Stanford University's rule, one of the most modest and cautiously drafted, had been declared unconstitutional by a California Superior Court. Hate speech regulation is far from over. To the contrary, hate speech rules not only continue to exist, but the courts regularly enforce their provisions. The difference is that these cases are largely restricted to a single category-sexual harassment. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and with the regulatory support of the Equal …