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Fourth amendment

2011

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Law

Smartphone, Dumb Regulations: Mixed Signals In Mobile Privacy, Christian Levis Dec 2011

Smartphone, Dumb Regulations: Mixed Signals In Mobile Privacy, Christian Levis

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The smartphone has turned a user’s location into valuable information. Users of smart devices can use location-based mobile services to get driving directions, check into social networks, or even see which of their friends are around. But the use of this technology, and the new type of data created by it, raises privacy concerns as to who has access to one's location-based information. Because the only legislation covering this technology, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, is more than twenty-five years old, courts encounter problems when trying to use it to resolve these privacy issues, often reaching illogical results. This Note …


“A More Majestic Conception:” The Importance Of Judicial Integrity In Preserving The Exclusionary Rule, Robert M. Bloom, David H. Fentin Oct 2011

“A More Majestic Conception:” The Importance Of Judicial Integrity In Preserving The Exclusionary Rule, Robert M. Bloom, David H. Fentin

Robert M. Bloom

In Mapp v. Ohio (1961), the Warren Court held that the so-called exclusionary rule was applicable to the states. Subsequent Supreme Courts have shown their disenchantment with the rule by seeking to curb its applicability. Most recently, the Court has characterized the exclusionary rule as a “massive remedy” to be applied only as a “last resort.” The Courts’ analytical framework for the last thirty-five years for cutting back the exclusionary rule was a balancing test which weighed the costs of suppressing reliable evidence with the benefits of deterring future police violations. This balancing has been used most recently in two …


Defining Instrumentalities Of Deadly Force, Tim Longo Oct 2011

Defining Instrumentalities Of Deadly Force, Tim Longo

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


City Court Of New York, City Of Watertown: People V. Saldana, Ara K. Ayvazian Oct 2011

City Court Of New York, City Of Watertown: People V. Saldana, Ara K. Ayvazian

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Appellate Division, Second Department: People V. Rodriguez, Michael J. Puma Oct 2011

Appellate Division, Second Department: People V. Rodriguez, Michael J. Puma

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


City Court Of New York, City Of Watertown: People V. Saldana, Ara K. Ayvazian Oct 2011

City Court Of New York, City Of Watertown: People V. Saldana, Ara K. Ayvazian

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Supreme Court Of New York, New York County: People V. Derrell, Maurice M. Labrie Oct 2011

Supreme Court Of New York, New York County: People V. Derrell, Maurice M. Labrie

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


That's Not My Bag, Baby: The Seventh Circuit Tackles Fourth Amendment Standing In United States V. Carlisle, Mariana Karampelas May 2011

That's Not My Bag, Baby: The Seventh Circuit Tackles Fourth Amendment Standing In United States V. Carlisle, Mariana Karampelas

Seventh Circuit Review

In its recent decision in United States v. Carlisle, the Seventh Circuit made clear that challenging the constitutionality of a search is no easy task. Although the Fourth Amendment protects individuals from unreasonable government intrusion, defendants seeking to suppress evidence must first prove a reasonable expectation of privacy. This Note will use Carlisle as a basis of exploring the law of Fourth Amendment standing. This Note will argue that the Seventh Circuit applied a flawed test in evaluating a defendant's subjective expectation of privacy, but nevertheless arrived at a result supported by existing precedent. Finally, this Note will examine …


How Public Schools Can Constitutionally Halt Cyberbullying: A Model Cyberbullying Policy That Survives First Amendment, Fourth Amendment, And Due Process Challenges, Naomi Harlin Goodno Apr 2011

How Public Schools Can Constitutionally Halt Cyberbullying: A Model Cyberbullying Policy That Survives First Amendment, Fourth Amendment, And Due Process Challenges, Naomi Harlin Goodno

Naomi Harlin Goodno

There have been all too many recent cases where children are taking their lives because of cyberbullying. Schools, courts, and legislatures are struggling with how to deal with such tragedies. Imagine two public school students, Joe and Jane. Joe punches Jane during class. The school is certainly within its legal rights to discipline Joe. Assume, instead, Joe punches Jane while both are walking home from school. The school cannot discipline Joe because the act took place off-campus. Now, assume instead, that Joe, while at home and using his own laptop, creates a website about Jane stating that he wished she …


The Talmudic Rule Against Self-Incrimination And The American Exclusionary Rule: A Societal Prohibition Versus An Affirmative Individual Right, Suzanne Darrow Kleinhaus Mar 2011

The Talmudic Rule Against Self-Incrimination And The American Exclusionary Rule: A Societal Prohibition Versus An Affirmative Individual Right, Suzanne Darrow Kleinhaus

Suzanne Darrow Kleinhaus

No abstract provided.


Reconsidering A Parent’S ‘Apparent’ Authority In Intergenerational Co-Residence: The Need For A Paradigm Shift In Evaluating Parental Consent To Search Adult Children’S Bedrooms, Hillary B. Farber Feb 2011

Reconsidering A Parent’S ‘Apparent’ Authority In Intergenerational Co-Residence: The Need For A Paradigm Shift In Evaluating Parental Consent To Search Adult Children’S Bedrooms, Hillary B. Farber

Hillary B. Farber

Intergenerational households are the fastest growing living arrangement in the country. The foreclosure crisis, high unemployment rate, and exorbitant health care costs are causing adults across the generational spectrum to make choices based on their newly realized financial circumstances. An important social effect caused by the weakened economy is that more adult children are moving back into their parent’s home, and aging parents are increasingly seeking refuge in their adult child’s home.

Firmly established precedent makes clear that a parent’s consent to a police search of a minor child’s bedroom for evidence of a minor’s criminal activity is a reasonable …


Legal Issues Regarding Digital Forensic Examiners Third Party Consent To Search, Thomas Lonardo, Doug White, Tricia P. Martland, Alan Rea Jan 2011

Legal Issues Regarding Digital Forensic Examiners Third Party Consent To Search, Thomas Lonardo, Doug White, Tricia P. Martland, Alan Rea

Journal of Digital Forensics, Security and Law

This paper focuses on Federal law as it relates to consent to search relating to Fourth Amendment privacy in the practice of Digital Forensics. In particular, Digital Examiners should be aware of how decisions in Federal Court may impact their ability to acquire evidence in both civil and criminal settings. Digital Forensics, being a relatively new field, is particularly subject to change as cases and appeals are decided. This paper provides an overview of relevant case law relating to issues in Digital Forensics. More importantly, our research provides Digital Forensic Examiners (DFE), as defined by Lonardo, White, and Rea (2008, …


Streaming The International Silver Platter Doctrine: Coordinating Transnational Law Enforcement In The Age Of Global Terrorism And Technology, Caitlin T. Street Jan 2011

Streaming The International Silver Platter Doctrine: Coordinating Transnational Law Enforcement In The Age Of Global Terrorism And Technology, Caitlin T. Street

National Security Law Program

The dramatic expansion of technology and globalization over the last thirty years has not only facilitated transnational terrorist operations, but also has transformed the countermeasures utilized by law enforcement and amplified the need for counterterrorism coordination between foreign and domestic authorities. Crucially, these changes have altered the fourth amendment calculus, set out by the international silver platter doctrine, for admitting evidence seized in U.S.-foreign cooperative searches abroad. Under the international silver platter doctrine, courts admit the evidence gathered by foreign authorities abroad unless the unreasonable search is deemed a "joint venture" between U.S. and foreign authorities. Notably, the legal framework …


Cell Phone Searches Incident To Arrest: A New Standard Based On Arizona V. Gant, Ben E. Stewart Jan 2011

Cell Phone Searches Incident To Arrest: A New Standard Based On Arizona V. Gant, Ben E. Stewart

Kentucky Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Parent's "Apparent" Authority: Why Intergenerational Coresidence Requires A Reassessment Of Parental Consent To Search Adult Children's Bedrooms, Hillary B. Farber Jan 2011

A Parent's "Apparent" Authority: Why Intergenerational Coresidence Requires A Reassessment Of Parental Consent To Search Adult Children's Bedrooms, Hillary B. Farber

Faculty Publications

The proliferation of multigenerational U.S. households provides a new perspective on the social customs and practices concerning coresidence in the United States. Rather than relying outdated presumptions of parental control, this Article argues that police should be compelled to conduct a more thorough inquiry before searching areas occupied exclusively by the adult child. Police should differentiate between "common" and private areas, and inquire into any agreements - formal or informal - that the parent and child may have regarding access and control over such areas. By fully recognizing the changing nature of the American household and rejecting a bare reliance …


Dna Database Trawls And The Definition Of A Search In Boroian V. Mueller, David H. Kaye Jan 2011

Dna Database Trawls And The Definition Of A Search In Boroian V. Mueller, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

As a general matter, once the government acquires information from a permissible search or seizure, it can use this information in later criminal investigations. Courts have applied this simple rule to uphold the indefinite reuse of DNA samples acquired from convicted offenders. This essay describes the First Circuit Court of Appeals’ reliance on the rule in rejecting a convicted offender’s claim that his DNA sample and profile had to be removed from the federal DNA databank after he completed his sentence. Acknowledging that the rule permitting reuse should not be applied mechanically, I argue that the rule's application to DNA …


Pledge Your Body For Your Bread: Welfare, Drug Testing, And The Inferior Fourth Amendment, Jordan C. Budd Jan 2011

Pledge Your Body For Your Bread: Welfare, Drug Testing, And The Inferior Fourth Amendment, Jordan C. Budd

Law Faculty Scholarship

Proposals to subject welfare recipients to periodic drug testing have emerged over the last three years as a significant legislative trend across the United States. Since 2007, over half of the states have considered bills requiring aid recipients to submit to invasive extraction procedures as an ongoing condition of public assistance. The vast majority of the legislation imposes testing without regard to suspected drug use, reflecting the implicit assumption that the poor are inherently predisposed to culpable conduct and thus may be subject to class-based intrusions that would be inarguably impermissible if inflicted on the less destitute. These proposals are …


The Timely Demise Of The Fourth Amendment Third Party Doctrine, Stephen E. Henderson Dec 2010

The Timely Demise Of The Fourth Amendment Third Party Doctrine, Stephen E. Henderson

Stephen E Henderson

In what may be a slightly premature obituary, in this response to a forthcoming paper by Matthew Tokson I argue that the Fourth Amendment third party doctrine "has at least taken ill, and it can be hoped it is an illness from which it will never recover." It is increasingly unpopular as a matter of state constitutional law, has long been assailed in scholarship but now thoughtful alternatives are percolating, and it cannot – or at least should not – withstand the pressures which technology and social norms are placing upon it. Even the Supreme Court seems loath to defend …