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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law School News: The Honorable Edward C. Clifton: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-17-2021, Michael M. Bowden May 2021

Law School News: The Honorable Edward C. Clifton: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-17-2021, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Law School News: Olin W. Thompson, Iii: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-08-2020, Roger Williams University School Of Law May 2020

Law School News: Olin W. Thompson, Iii: Doctor Of Laws, Honoris Causa 05-08-2020, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Law School News: Millennial Law 08-21-2019, Dick Dahl Aug 2019

Law School News: Millennial Law 08-21-2019, Dick Dahl

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Law School News: A Mandate For Change 01-24-2019, Michael M. Bowden Jan 2019

Law School News: A Mandate For Change 01-24-2019, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Does Testing = Race Discrimination?: Ricci, The Bar Exam, The Lsat, And The Challenge To Learning, Dan Subotnik Apr 2014

Does Testing = Race Discrimination?: Ricci, The Bar Exam, The Lsat, And The Challenge To Learning, Dan Subotnik

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Aptitude and achievement tests have been under heavy attack in the courts and in academic literature for at least forty years. Griggs v. Duke Power (1971) and Ricci v. DeStefano (2009) are the most important judicial battle sites. In those cases, the Supreme Court decided the circumstances under which test could be used by an employer to screen employees for promotion when the test had a negative racial impact on test takers. The related battles over testing for entry into the legal academy and from the academy into the legal profession have been no less fierce. The assault on testing …


A Normalized Scoring Model For Law School Competitions, Edward K. Cheng, Scott J. Farmer Jan 2013

A Normalized Scoring Model For Law School Competitions, Edward K. Cheng, Scott J. Farmer

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Although the focus in this Article is moot court scoring, one can envision many other instances of law school assessment in which such a normalization problem arises. Law review competitions also involve different sets of graders, whose subjective determinations must be reasonably commensurate to make fair comparisons. Even more intriguing, although presenting a more complicated problem, law school grades suffer the same normalization concern. Courses feature material with different degrees of difficulty, attract different pools of students, and are taught by different instructors. Yet, class rank and graduation honors are ultimately calculated under the assumption that all grades are commensurate. …


Private Rights And Collective Governance: A Functional Approach To Natural Resources Law, Eric T. Freyfogle Jun 2007

Private Rights And Collective Governance: A Functional Approach To Natural Resources Law, Eric T. Freyfogle

The Future of Natural Resources Law and Policy (Summer Conference, June 6-8)

4 pages.

"Eric T. Freyfogle, Max L. Rowe Professor of Law, University of Illinois College of Law"


Forgetfulness, Fuzziness, Functionality, Fairness And Freedom, In Dispute Resolution, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2003

Forgetfulness, Fuzziness, Functionality, Fairness And Freedom, In Dispute Resolution, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Professor Subrin is a self-professed traditionalist who has been one of the most forceful defenders of what I might term neo-traditional “Clarkian” litigation. By that, I mean the model of civil disputing in which litigation is a primary vehicle. More important, the litigation is based on notice pleading, broad discovery, and a preference for adjudication on the merits.

Key Subrin works over the years have focused on the historical path of the Clarkian model, which served to fuel much of the law revolution of the mid-Twentieth Century, to the “new era” of civil procedure and dispute resolution that dominated the …


Teaching In The Shadow Of The Bar, Joan W. Howarth Jan 1997

Teaching In The Shadow Of The Bar, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

This Essay is a memorial tribute to Professor Trina Grillo. Trina took seriously what many of us know but find too hard to remember: the student who is academically disqualified or who fails the bar examination might be the most brilliant in the class or the most needed within the profession. When we conceive of the bar exam as a particularly grueling and potentially unfair rite of passage between law school and the practice of law, we collude in hiding the pervasive and often negative power of the bar exam. The bar examination permeates and controls fundamental aspects of legal …


Values, Pierre Schlag Jan 1994

Values, Pierre Schlag

Publications

No abstract provided.


Fairness In Teaching Advocacy, Charles W. Joiner Jan 1985

Fairness In Teaching Advocacy, Charles W. Joiner

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The questions I address are these: Is fairness related to advocacy? Is fairness a concept that law teachers should address in their teaching, in particular in courses involving advocacy? By "courses involving advocacy" I mean courses that teach both law and practice techniques involving the direct protection of the rights of clients, particularly in the courts-for example, civil and criminal procedure and evidence.