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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Law

Slavery And The Sudan: Can Good Works Be Good?, Ibpp Editor Mar 1999

Slavery And The Sudan: Can Good Works Be Good?, Ibpp Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article focuses on the consequences of attempts to free slaves and abolish slavery in the Sudan.


In-House Live-Client Clinical Programs: Some Ethical Issues, James E. Moliterno Jan 1999

In-House Live-Client Clinical Programs: Some Ethical Issues, James E. Moliterno

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Towering Figures, Enigmas, And Responsive Communities In American Legal Ethics, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 1999

Towering Figures, Enigmas, And Responsive Communities In American Legal Ethics, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


The Professional And The Liar, Richard H. Underwood Jan 1999

The Professional And The Liar, Richard H. Underwood

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Many individuals in society think that all lawyers are liars. Some think lawyers are allowed to lie. Regrettably, some American lawyers apparently think so too. In the United States there has been, and continues to be, a troubling lack of professional consensus when it comes to litigating a case. Indeed, lawyers who are neither corrupt nor insensitive have been accused of arguing that the elicitation of false testimony, and the use of it, is a professional responsibility. Fairness also calls for some acknowledgment that even the most cunning, zealous, and successful of trial lawyers have agonized over such moral choices ...


Renewed Introspection And The Legal Profession, Eugene R. Gaetke Jan 1999

Renewed Introspection And The Legal Profession, Eugene R. Gaetke

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

As the twentieth century draws to a close, the legal profession again immersed in a process of self-assessment, reflection, and reform. Operating on several fronts, various constituent elements of the bar have recently completed or have underway significant projects relating to the law of lawyering.

Two efforts stand out in particular. For more than a decade, the American Law Institute has labored in the production of a new Restatement of the Law Governing Lawyers, and the organization stands now on the brink of that monumental work's publication. Equally significant, the American Bar Association has again undertaken a comprehensive review ...


A Proposal To Require Lawyers To Disclose Information About Procedural Matters, William H. Fortune Jan 1999

A Proposal To Require Lawyers To Disclose Information About Procedural Matters, William H. Fortune

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In the absence of a rule clearly requiring disclosure, a lawyer is obligated not to disclose information which is adverse to the interests of a client. However, judges should be able to expect lawyers to disclose information about procedural matters. This Article argues that Model Rule of Professional Conduct 3.3 should be amended to require disclosure of information about procedural matters. Part I describes the events in Potter v. Eli Lilly & Co., a case involving a secret settlement related to Prozac. Part II makes the argument for a rule requiring disclosure of procedural information. Part III describes how such ...


1998 Survey Of Ethics In Land-Use Planning, Patricia E. Salkin Jan 1999

1998 Survey Of Ethics In Land-Use Planning, Patricia E. Salkin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Limited Representation: Helping Clients While Protecting Yourself, Mary E. Berkheiser Jan 1999

Limited Representation: Helping Clients While Protecting Yourself, Mary E. Berkheiser

Scholarly Works

The lawyer-client relationship is defined by what the client retains the lawyer to do, and that retention may be as general or specific as the lawyer and client desire. The Nevada Supreme Court has recognized that even with regard to “a particular transaction or dispute, an attorney may be specifically employed in a limited capacity.” This freedom to contract for broader or narrower representation benefits both lawyers and clients. No lawyer can be a true generalist anymore, and most clients cannot afford the full range of representation that the legal profession offers on a single matter.


The National Association Of Honest Lawyers: An Essay On Honesty, "Lawyer Honesty" And Public Trust In The Legal System, John A. Humbach Jan 1999

The National Association Of Honest Lawyers: An Essay On Honesty, "Lawyer Honesty" And Public Trust In The Legal System, John A. Humbach

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The growing public disquiet about lawyer ethics is not mainly because people think lawyers neglect their professional standards. Rather, the main problem is the belief among lawyers that the duty of loyalty to clients requires a lawyer to mislead. Specifically, the ethical duty of confidentiality and the ethical duty of zealous advocacy are interpreted together to mean that lawyers must conceal some facts (‘confidentiality‘) while forcefully asserting others. This mis-coupling of these two key ethical duties has an inevitable tendency to produce a kind of partial-truth advocacy in which the lawyer knowingly distracts attention from the truth and fosters misconceptions ...


Moral Bankruptcy: Modeling Appropriate Attorney Behavior In Bankruptcy Cases, Nancy B. Rapoport Jan 1999

Moral Bankruptcy: Modeling Appropriate Attorney Behavior In Bankruptcy Cases, Nancy B. Rapoport

Scholarly Works

This essay discusses how important it is for lawyers, especially senior lawyers, to model appropriate behavior so that the newest lawyers learn how best to behave professionally.


Prosecuting Race, Anthony V. Alfieri Jan 1999

Prosecuting Race, Anthony V. Alfieri

Articles

Theoreticians and practitioners in the American criminal justice system increasingly debate the role of racial identity, racialized narratives, and race-neutral representation in law, lawyering, and ethics.

This debate holds special bearing on the growing prosecution and defense of acts of racially motivated violence. In this continuing investigation of the prosecution and defense of such violence, Professor Alfieri examines the recent federal prosecution of five white New York City police officers charged with assaulting Abner Louima, a young male Haitian immigrant, in 1997. Professor Alfieri presents a race conscious, community-oriented model of prosecutorial discretion guided by constitutional precepts, citizenship ideals, professionalism ...


Can A Religious Person Be A Big Firm Litigator? , Amelia J. Uelmen Jan 1999

Can A Religious Person Be A Big Firm Litigator? , Amelia J. Uelmen

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay takes on the challenge of describing some of the ways in which values often defined as "personal" or "religious" can be integrated into the practice of law at a large firm. Part I describes some of the aspects of big firm practice that make it particularly difficult to integrate religious and personal values which may give meaning to one's work. Part II suggests that such meaning can be found through a religious vision of what it means to be a person, which includes a sense of obligation to serve the common good. Part III explores how this ...


Religion And The Public Defender, Sadiq Reza Jan 1999

Religion And The Public Defender, Sadiq Reza

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This essay argues that the public defender should not undertake, or fail to undertake, any action to the legal detriment of a client on the basis of a conflict the attorney perceives between religious and professional responsibility, except for imminent death or serious bodily harm to another. Having accepted the responsibility of representing indigent criminal defendants, the public defender is duty-bound to not compromise that responsibility for competing religious obligations. This argument rests on four premises: (1) the public defender occupies a unique position in our legal system, and options available to private interest lawyers or other clients should not ...


Friends Of The Court? The Ethics Of Amicus Brief Writing In First Amendment Litigation, Allison Lucas Jan 1999

Friends Of The Court? The Ethics Of Amicus Brief Writing In First Amendment Litigation, Allison Lucas

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Article explores the ethics of writing amicus briefs as they relate to defamation and privacy issues by focusing on two specific cases, Rice v. Paladin and Khawar v. Globe, International. It begins with a history of amicus curaie briefs, followed by a discussion of the two cases. In Paladin, a family sued a publishing company arguing that a book it published aided and abetted a murder. In Khawar, a photo was wrongly placed in a book and was subsequently printed in a newspaper. In both cases, amicus briefs were submitted on the part of the defendants from large media ...


Of Cell Phones And Electronic Mail: Disclosure Of Confidential Information Under Disciplinary Rule 4-101 And Model Rule 1.6, Karin M. Mika Jan 1999

Of Cell Phones And Electronic Mail: Disclosure Of Confidential Information Under Disciplinary Rule 4-101 And Model Rule 1.6, Karin M. Mika

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Regardless of the known security risks, it is difficult, if not impossible, to imagine a law firm in the twentieth century operating without the technological advancements that make it possible to communicate with anyone, anywhere, at any time. These advancements often enable immediate responses that are beneficial to attorneys and clients alike. Cellular phone usage and electronic mail are an integral mode of communication between firm members, negotiating attorneys, as well as between attorneys and their clients. While it has developed into a mode of communication making the practice of law more efficient, it is doubtful that most attorneys give ...