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Why Whistleblowers Lose: An Empirical And Qualitative Analysis Of State Court Cases, Nancy M. Modesitt Oct 2013

Why Whistleblowers Lose: An Empirical And Qualitative Analysis Of State Court Cases, Nancy M. Modesitt

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This Article was originally intended to be an analysis of the propriety, or impropriety, of the doctrines most commonly used by courts to decide employees’ whistleblowing retaliation claims against employers. However, upon conducting initial research, it quickly became apparent that there was very little data available on whistleblowing cases. Unlike employment discrimination cases, where several empirical studies have been conducted, there is only one empirical analysis of whistleblower claims, which focused solely on outcomes in the federal administrative process for claims brought under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). That study revealed that whistleblowers fare poorly for a number of reasons, but …


To Cloak The Within: Protecting Employees From Personality Testing, Elizabeth De Armond Jan 2012

To Cloak The Within: Protecting Employees From Personality Testing, Elizabeth De Armond

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Employees and job applicants are often subjected to personality tests that seek sensitive, internal information. These tests can intrude on individual privacy simply by their inquisition, and disclosure of their results can pigeonhole and stigmatize people. The work of sociologist Erving Goffman offers insights into the nature of these harms. Furthermore, the personality tests often do not reliably and accurately measure personality traits, and employers may not have accurately identified traits that enhance performance in specific jobs. Current legal structures, including the federal and state constitutions and the Americans with Disabilities Act, may apply to such tests, but are inadequate …


Reinventing The Eeoc, Nancy M. Modesitt Oct 2010

Reinventing The Eeoc, Nancy M. Modesitt

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The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has struggled to be a meaningful force in eradicating employment discrimination since its inception. The primary reasons for this are structural in nature. The EEOC was designed to react to discrimination complaints by investigating and conciliating all of the thousands of complaints filed annually. The EEOC has never been able to investigate all these complaints despite using the vast majority of its resources attempting to do so. The devotion of resources to managing and investigating the huge volume of complaints prevents the EEOC from taking more effective steps to eliminate discrimination. This article proposes …


The Myth Of Equality In The Employment Relation, Aditi Bagchi Mar 2009

The Myth Of Equality In The Employment Relation, Aditi Bagchi

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Although it is widely understood that employers and employees are not equally situated, we fail adequately to account for this inequality in the law governing their relationship. We can best understand this inequality in terms of status, which encompasses one’s level of income, leisure and discretion. For a variety of misguided reasons, contract law has been historically highly resistant to the introduction of status-based principles. Courts have preferred to characterize the unfavorable circumstances that many employees face as the product of unequal bargaining power. But bargaining power disparity does not capture the moral problem raised by inequality in the employment …


Employer Liability For Supervisors' Intentional Torts: The Uncertain Scope Of The "Alter Ego" Exception, Michael Hayes, Quinn Broverman Mar 1998

Employer Liability For Supervisors' Intentional Torts: The Uncertain Scope Of The "Alter Ego" Exception, Michael Hayes, Quinn Broverman

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When Illinois employees are the victims of intentional torts by supervisors, can they bring common law tort suits against their employers for these injuries, or are they limited to bringing a claim under the workers' compensation system? This question, which arises with unfortunate reguIarity, lacks a clear answer because both state and federal courts in Illinois are divided over the scope of the "alter ego" exception to the exclusivity of workers' compensation as the remedy for intentionally inflicted workplace injuries.

The Illinois Workers' Compensation Act ("IWCA") contains exclusivity provisions that mandate that workers' compensation is the sole remedy available to …