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Full-Text Articles in Law

Special Treatment Stigma After The Ada Amendments Act, Nicole Buonocore Porter Mar 2016

Special Treatment Stigma After The Ada Amendments Act, Nicole Buonocore Porter

Pepperdine Law Review

This article explores a unique source of stigma suffered by individuals with disabilities in the workplace. Instead of focusing on those with the most stigmatizing disabilities, I focus on those individuals who have disabilities that are not perceived as very severe, yet they still suffer stigma. These individuals are stigmatized because of the special treatment they receive (or are perceived as receiving) through workplace accommodations provided pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In prior work, I have called this phenomenon “special treatment stigma,” the harm that arises from receiving special treatment in the workplace, especially when co-workers believe ...


Towards Reasonable: The Rise Of State Pregnancy Accommodation Laws, Stephanie A. Pisko Jan 2016

Towards Reasonable: The Rise Of State Pregnancy Accommodation Laws, Stephanie A. Pisko

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

In light of the recent Supreme Court decision Young v. UPS, pregnancy accommodation in the workplace is once again at the forefront of employment law. Pregnancy is not considered a disability under the ADA, nor is it within the scope of Title VII protections, but states are passing their own pregnancy accommodation laws. These laws will affect employers and employees alike, but exactly how is uncertain. Perhaps the most natural (and obvious) result of the explosion of state pregnancy accommodation laws will be a federal law, or an amendment to the ADA categorizing pregnancy as a disability. But there are ...


Designing A Flexible World For The Many: "Essential Functions" And Title I Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Michael J. Powers Jan 2014

Designing A Flexible World For The Many: "Essential Functions" And Title I Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Michael J. Powers

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Note explores how courts interpret the meaning of “essential functions” under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To be protected under the ADA, a plaintiff must be able to perform the “essential functions” of her job with or without a reasonable accommodation. In general, courts follow one of two approaches when interpreting this phrase. The first approach narrowly focuses on the employer’s judgment regarding which functions are essential. The second approach considers the employer’s judgment, but looks beyond to consider the broader employment relationship. This Note argues that these different approaches have led to varying ...


Institute Brief: Support Through Mentorship: Accessible Supervision Of Employees With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities, John Kramer, Ashley Wolfe, Jean Winsor Jul 2013

Institute Brief: Support Through Mentorship: Accessible Supervision Of Employees With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities, John Kramer, Ashley Wolfe, Jean Winsor

The Institute Brief Series, Institute for Community Inclusion

Effective supervision of employees with intellectual or developmental disabilities can be challenging for businesses that may not have experience in hiring people with diverse support requirements. This is largely due to the relatively low participation rates of people with disabilities in the workforce. This is, thankfully, changing as more businesses are seeing the value of diversifying their workforce, which includes hiring people with diverse cognitive abilities like people with intellectual or developmental disabilities.


Practical Tips For Employers For Compliance With The Ada , Patrick L. Clancy Apr 2013

Practical Tips For Employers For Compliance With The Ada , Patrick L. Clancy

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Aids, Employment And The Law, American Bar Association; Aids Coordinating Committee Apr 2013

Aids, Employment And The Law, American Bar Association; Aids Coordinating Committee

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Legal Implications Of Substance Abuse Testing In The Workplace, Michael S. Cecere, Phillip B. Rosen Apr 2013

Legal Implications Of Substance Abuse Testing In The Workplace, Michael S. Cecere, Phillip B. Rosen

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Mitigation And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Jill Elaine Hasday Nov 2004

Mitigation And The Americans With Disabilities Act, Jill Elaine Hasday

Michigan Law Review

It is an open question whether the prohibition on employment discrimination in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects plaintiffs who have not attempted to mitigate the effect of their disability on their ability to work. Suppose, for example, that a job applicant has severely impaired vision because of a corneal disease. He can have corneal transplant surgery that his doctors recommend and expect will allow him to see much more clearly, but he does not want to have the surgery because of the complications sometimes associated with the operation and the possibility that the surgery will not work. He ...


Crazy (Mental Illness Under The Ada), Jane Byeff Korn Apr 2003

Crazy (Mental Illness Under The Ada), Jane Byeff Korn

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Article examines how people with mental disabilities and mental illnesses have been treated under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Part I addresses the history of mental illness. It argues that while beliefs about the causes and content of mental illness have vacillated over time, the mentally ill have received consistently poor treatment throughout human history. Part II addresses present problems with the definition of mental illness, including how mental illness and mental disability are defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Part III discusses the problems faced by people with mental illness today. The author argues the current state ...


The Law And Economics Of Disability Accommodations, Michael Ashley Stein Jan 2003

The Law And Economics Of Disability Accommodations, Michael Ashley Stein

Faculty Publications

The Americans with Disabilities Act provides a clear mandate that disabled workers be provided with "reasonable" accommodations, but does not meaningfully articulate the standards by which reasonableness ought to be measured. Until now, neither courts nor commentators have provided a systematic model for analyzing accommodation claims. This Article articulates an initial law and economics framework for analyzing disability-related accommodations. In doing so, it demonstrates how accommodations span a cost continuum that can be divided into areas of Wholly Efficient and Semi-Efficient Accommodations to be funded by private employers, Social Benefit Gain Efficient Accommodations where the costs should be borne by ...


Tools For Inclusion: One-Stop Centers: A Guide For Job Seekers With Disabilities, Sheila Fesko, David Hoff, Melanie Jordan Feb 2000

Tools For Inclusion: One-Stop Centers: A Guide For Job Seekers With Disabilities, Sheila Fesko, David Hoff, Melanie Jordan

Tools for Inclusion Series, Institute for Community Inclusion

General information about the One-Stop system and answers to specific questions individuals with disabilities may have about One-Stop services.


Is There A Pink Slip In My Genes? Genetic Discrimination In The Workplace, Paul Steven Miller, Lawrence O. Gostin Jan 2000

Is There A Pink Slip In My Genes? Genetic Discrimination In The Workplace, Paul Steven Miller, Lawrence O. Gostin

Journal of Health Care Law and Policy

No abstract provided.


Workmen's Compensation--Encouraging Employment Of The Handicapped In Michigan: A Proposal For Revision Of The Michigan Second Injury Fund, Michigan Law Review Dec 1968

Workmen's Compensation--Encouraging Employment Of The Handicapped In Michigan: A Proposal For Revision Of The Michigan Second Injury Fund, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Employment of the handicapped is clearly a proper concern of the state. Unemployed, such a person is a burden on his family and on the state; welfare and relief payments to such a person needlessly increase costs to both the state and local governments supporting such programs. Employed, the handicapped person is a self-supporting, stable member of the community; he becomes a taxpayer rather than a tax consumer. There are also important moral and social considerations which may be simply summarized stating that no person who is able to work should be needlessly denied employment. In short, any continued waste ...