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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Law

Materiality And The Efficient Capital Market Model: A Recipe From The Total Mix, Roger J. Dennis Apr 1983

Materiality And The Efficient Capital Market Model: A Recipe From The Total Mix, Roger J. Dennis

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Legalization Of American Society: Economic Regulation, Peter O. Steiner Apr 1983

The Legalization Of American Society: Economic Regulation, Peter O. Steiner

Michigan Law Review

My central thesis is that regulation may be insightfully classified into three broad types of response to perceived market failure, and I will merely touch examples of each. The first is protection of competitive results. I shall focus on natural monopoly regulation, although anti-trust would do as well. The second is protection from competitive results, such as entry control and setting of minimum prices. The third is regulation of externalities such as pollution and accidents arising as byproducts of more usual production.


United States International Competitiveness And Trade Policies For The 1980s, Dan Quayle Jan 1983

United States International Competitiveness And Trade Policies For The 1980s, Dan Quayle

Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business

A new wave of protectionism is upon us and its undertow, if not the wave itself, constitutes a serious threat to the Western alliance. This "neo-protectionism" differs from familiar past practices relying heavily on higher tariffs; it is more often charactierized by the use of more subtle ploys such as dumping, subsidization, and the erection of difficult marketing requirements for foreign traders.


Legal Analysis And The Economic Analysis Of Allocative Efficiency: A Response To Professor Posner's Reply, Richard S. Markovits Jan 1983

Legal Analysis And The Economic Analysis Of Allocative Efficiency: A Response To Professor Posner's Reply, Richard S. Markovits

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


Title V Of The 2nd Lome Convention Between Eec And Acp States: A Critical Assessment Of The Industrial Cooperation As It Relates To Africa, Ndiva Kofele-Kale Jan 1983

Title V Of The 2nd Lome Convention Between Eec And Acp States: A Critical Assessment Of The Industrial Cooperation As It Relates To Africa, Ndiva Kofele-Kale

Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business

On October 31, 1979, representatives from fifty-eight African-Caribbean-Pacific (ACP) and nine European Economic Community (EEC) States signed the second Lome Convetion. This agreement will govern the technical, commercial, and financial relations between the two groups of countries from March 1, 1980 through February 28, 1985. Lome II is the fifth in a series of conventions concluded between the EEC countries and the developing nations of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. Like its predecessors, Lome II was designed to "establish a model for relations between developed and developing states," and lay the foundation for a "New International Economic Order." Toward ...


A Close Analysis Of Buyers And Antitrust Markets, Warren G. Lavey Jan 1983

A Close Analysis Of Buyers And Antitrust Markets, Warren G. Lavey

Washington University Law Review

This Article describes a procedure for ascertaining the proper universe of buyers in a market and using this identified group of buyers to define relevant product and geographic markets. The "affected-buyers" analysis recommended in this Article involves three steps. First, identify a group of buyers with a common demand. A firm attempting to increase its price to this group for some output satisfying this common demand may be likely to find that its sales to other buyers are affected as well. Second, designate the "common demand" group plus these other likely affected buyers as the proper universe of buyers for ...


Afterword: Contracts And Uncertainty, Walter F. Pratt Jan 1983

Afterword: Contracts And Uncertainty, Walter F. Pratt

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Licensure Of Health Care Professionals: The Consumer's Case For Abolition, Charles H. Baron Jan 1983

Licensure Of Health Care Professionals: The Consumer's Case For Abolition, Charles H. Baron

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

While state medical licensure laws ostensibly are intended to promote worthwhile goals, such as the maintenance of high standards in health care delivery, this Article argues that these laws in practice are detrimental to consumers. The Article takes the position that licensure contributes to high medical care costs and stifles competition, innovation and consumer autonomy. It concludes that delicensure would expand the range of health services available to consumers and reduce patient dependency, and that these developments would tend to make medical practice more satisfying to consumers and providers of health care services.