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Full-Text Articles in Law

Conceptualizing Constitutional Litigation As Anti-Government Expression: A Speech-Centered Theory Of Court Access, Robert L. Tsai Aug 2012

Conceptualizing Constitutional Litigation As Anti-Government Expression: A Speech-Centered Theory Of Court Access, Robert L. Tsai

Robert L Tsai

This Article proposes a speech-based right of court access. First, it finds the traditional due process approach to be analytically incoherent and of limited practical value. Second, it contends that history, constitutional structure, and theory all support conceiving of the right of access as the modern analogue to the right to petition government for redress. Third, the Article explores the ways in which the civil rights plaintiff's lawsuit tracks the behavior of the traditional dissident. Fourth, by way of a case study, the essay argues that recent restrictions - notably, a congressional limitation on the amount of fees counsel for …


Community Redevelopment, Public Use, And Eminent Domain, Patricia E. Salkin, Lora A. Lucero Jul 2012

Community Redevelopment, Public Use, And Eminent Domain, Patricia E. Salkin, Lora A. Lucero

Patricia E. Salkin

Published just weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court handed down their controversial decision on Kelo v. City of New London in 2005, this article, in correctly predicting the outcome of the Supreme Court opinion, explores in Section I how the concept of what constitutes a public use has evolved over the decades from traditionally accepted uses such as public roads, buildings (e.g., government buildings and schools), and utilities to urban redevelopment. It explains how the broad concepts of community redevelopment have been stretched to encompass needed economic development projects that promise jobs, tax revenue, and other public benefits similar to …


Defending Junk-Debt-Buyer Lawsuits, Peter A. Holland Jun 2012

Defending Junk-Debt-Buyer Lawsuits, Peter A. Holland

Peter A. Holland

Junk debt buyer lawsuits have overwhelmed the courts all across the United States. These lawsuits wreak havoc on consumers and their families. Often overlooked is the fact that judgments against consumers which are based on junk debt are part of a zero sum game, where every bogus judgment deprives a legitimate creditor of the chance to get paid from scarce resources. Thus, the legitimate creditor to whom money is owed is materially harmed by the junk debt buyer who extracts money based on an illegitimate claim, or who causes someone to declare bankruptcy. Providing representation to this otherwise unrepresented population …


Confine Is Fine: Have The Non-Dangerous Mentally Ill Lost Their Right To Liberty? An Empirical Study To Unravel The Psychiatrist's Crystal Ball, Donald Stone Mar 2012

Confine Is Fine: Have The Non-Dangerous Mentally Ill Lost Their Right To Liberty? An Empirical Study To Unravel The Psychiatrist's Crystal Ball, Donald Stone

Donald H. Stone

This article will examine the reverse trend in civil commitment laws in the wake of recent tragedies and discuss the effect of broader civil commitment standards on the care and treatment of the mentally ill. The 2007 Virginia Tech shooting and the 2011 shooting of Congresswoman Giffords have spurred fierce debates about the dangerousness of mentally ill and serve as cautionary tale about what happens when warning signs go unnoticed and opportunities for early intervention missed. This article will explore the misconception about the role medication and inpatient civil commitments should play in prevention of dangerousness and undermine the belief …


The Constitutionality Of Government Fees As Applied To The Poor, Henry Rose Feb 2012

The Constitutionality Of Government Fees As Applied To The Poor, Henry Rose

Henry Rose

The Constitutionality of Government Fees as Applied to the Poor

Abstract

The United States Supreme Court has considered on many occasions the constitutionality of government fees that indigent persons were unable to pay. As a result of their inability to pay, these indigent persons were initially denied access to legal process, (in both the civil and criminal context), access to electoral processes and access to general government services. The most recent decision of the Supreme Court involving this issue, M.L.B. v. S.L.J., 519 U.S. 102 (1996), has resulted in a lack of clarity as to the constitutional principles that the …


Illegal Emigration: The Continuing Life Of Invalid Deportation Orders, Richard Frankel Dec 2011

Illegal Emigration: The Continuing Life Of Invalid Deportation Orders, Richard Frankel

Richard H. Frankel

Federal appeals courts overturn more than one thousand deportation orders every year. A significant number of those reversals involve non-citizens who are abroad because they have been deported as a result of losing their cases at the administrative level. Although an order overturning a deportation order ordinarily restores non-citizens to their prior status of being lawfully present in the United States, federal immigration authorities have used the fact of the non-citizen’s now-invalidated deportation to subject such non-citizens to a new and previously inapplicable set of standards that effectively prevents them from returning. Under this practice, non-citizens who seek to return …