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Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Law

Everything Old Is New Again: Does The '.Sucks' Gtld Change The Regulatory Paradigm In North America?, Jacqueline D. Lipton Jan 2019

Everything Old Is New Again: Does The '.Sucks' Gtld Change The Regulatory Paradigm In North America?, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Articles

In 2012, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (“ICANN”) took the unprecedented step of opening up the generic Top Level Domain (“gTLD”) space for entities who wanted to run registries for any new alphanumeric string “to the right of the dot” in a domain name. After a number of years of vetting applications, the first round of new gTLDs was released in 2013, and those gTLDs began to come online shortly thereafter. One of the more contentious of these gTLDs was “.sucks” which came online in 2015. The original application for the “.sucks” registry was somewhat contentious with ...


Territorialization Of The Internet Domain Name System, Marketa Trimble Jan 2018

Territorialization Of The Internet Domain Name System, Marketa Trimble

Scholarly Works

A territorialization of the internet – the linking of the internet to physical geography – is a growing trend. Internet users have become accustomed to the conveniences of localized advertising, have enjoyed location-based services, and have witnessed an increasing use of geolocation and geoblocking tools by service and content providers who – for various reasons – either allow or block access to internet content based on users’ physical locations. This article analyzes whether, and if so how, the territorialization trend has affected the internet Domain Name System (“DNS”). As a hallmark of cyberspace governance that aimed to be detached from the territoriallypartitioned governance of ...


Private Property For Public Use: The Federal Trademark Dilution Act And Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act As Violations Of The Fifth Amendment Takings Clause, Brian C. Smith Oct 2016

Private Property For Public Use: The Federal Trademark Dilution Act And Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act As Violations Of The Fifth Amendment Takings Clause, Brian C. Smith

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Does The Lanham Act Lose Meaning For Companies That Operate Exclusively Over The Internet?, Sheila D. Rizzo Apr 2016

Does The Lanham Act Lose Meaning For Companies That Operate Exclusively Over The Internet?, Sheila D. Rizzo

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

This Note will examine the differences between trademark registration and domain name registration, focusing specifically on the terms an applicant may register, the rights associated with those registrations, and the manner in which a registrant may lose, assign, and enforce those rights so that others my not use the same registered terms. This Note will also suggest that a company operating exclusively over the internet may obtain greater rights, and therefore protection, than a typical bricks and mortar company, simply by registering its domain name, and not trademark status.


Passing The Virtual Buck: How The Ninth Circuit Used Contributory Trademark Law To Expand Liability For Web Hosts, Alessandra Backus Mar 2016

Passing The Virtual Buck: How The Ninth Circuit Used Contributory Trademark Law To Expand Liability For Web Hosts, Alessandra Backus

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Domain Name Allocation And Government Super-Prioritization, Heather A. Forrest Jan 2015

Domain Name Allocation And Government Super-Prioritization, Heather A. Forrest

Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law

Governments' growing awareness of the Domain Name System (DNS), the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and its stewardship of DNS policy development fuel recent attempts to steer Internet domain name allocation toward policies that prioritize government interests ahead of all other rights and interests, including trademark rights. As the DNS expands, the top level in its hierarchical structure (the level of domains such as ".com" and ".uk") assumes the characteristics and attributes, and therefore also the conflicts and challenges, of its second level (the level of public-registered names). This Article argues that these developments necessitate a new ...


Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline D. Lipton Sep 2014

Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Akron Law Publications

In the lead-up to the next presidential election, it will be important for candidates both to maintain an online presence and to exercise control over bad faith uses of domain names and web content related to their campaigns. What are the legal implications for the domain name system? Although, for example, Senator Hillary Clinton now owns ‘hillaryclinton.com’, the more generic ‘hillary.com’ is registered to a software firm, Hillary Software, Inc. What about ‘hillary2008.com’? It is registered to someone outside the Clinton campaign and is not currently in active use. This article examines the large gaps and inconsistencies ...


Celebrity In Cyberspace: A Personality Rights Paradigm For Personal Domain Name Disputes, Jacqueline D. Lipton Sep 2014

Celebrity In Cyberspace: A Personality Rights Paradigm For Personal Domain Name Disputes, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Akron Law Publications

When the Oscar™-winning actress Julia Roberts fought for control of the domain name, what was her aim? Did she want to reap economic benefits from the name? Probably not, as she has not used the name since it was transferred to her. Or did she want to prevent others from using it on either an unjust enrichment or a privacy basis? Was she, in fact, protecting a trademark interest in her name? Personal domain name disputes, particularly those in the space, implicate unique aspects of an individual’s persona in cyberspace. Nevertheless, most of the legal rules developed for ...


Implementing An Online Dispute Resolution Scheme: Using Domain Name Registration Contracts To Create A Workable Framework, Michael G. Bowers May 2011

Implementing An Online Dispute Resolution Scheme: Using Domain Name Registration Contracts To Create A Workable Framework, Michael G. Bowers

Vanderbilt Law Review

Online businesses have grown tremendously in the past decade. As a larger percentage of the U.S. economy moves onto the Internet, a larger percentage of people doing business online will find themselves disagreeing with each other. How those disputes are resolved presents an ongoing challenge in a world where traditional ordering mechanisms, like geographical boundaries, become increasingly antiquated. As contracts are formed across state and national lines, dispute resolution systems built around spatial locations become ever more unwieldy. The complications and costs of securing a favorable decision from a far-off decisionmaking body make reliance on geographic-based systems exceedingly difficult ...


Can A State Seize An Internet Gambling Website's Domain Name? An Analysis Of The Kentucky Case, Kirk D. Homeyer Apr 2011

Can A State Seize An Internet Gambling Website's Domain Name? An Analysis Of The Kentucky Case, Kirk D. Homeyer

UNLV Gaming Law Journal

The newly developed Internet gambling forum has produced myriad legal issues affecting state, federal, and international law. The difficulty in addressing the issues arises from the ubiquity of the Internet. Based on an analysis of the Kentucky Case, this Note argues that a state cannot seize an Internet gambling website’s domain name for violating that state’s laws. First, Kentucky did not have personal jurisdiction over the gambling domain names’ registrars to have authority to seize them. Second, Kentucky’s gambling statute violates the Commerce Clause. Part II provides background to and the facts underlying the Kentucky Case and ...


Does It Really Suck?: The Impact Of Cutting-Edge Marketing Tactics On Internet Trademark Law And Gripe Site Domain Name Disputes, Mindy P. Fox Oct 2009

Does It Really Suck?: The Impact Of Cutting-Edge Marketing Tactics On Internet Trademark Law And Gripe Site Domain Name Disputes, Mindy P. Fox

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Celebrity In Cyberspace: A Personality Rights Paradigm For Personal Domain Name Disputes, Jacqueline Lipton Feb 2008

Celebrity In Cyberspace: A Personality Rights Paradigm For Personal Domain Name Disputes, Jacqueline Lipton

Jacqueline D Lipton

When the Oscar™-winning actress Julia Roberts fought for control of the domain name, what was her aim? Did she want to reap economic benefits from the name? Probably not, as she has not used the name since it was transferred to her. Or did she want to prevent others from using it on either an unjust enrichment or a privacy basis? Was she, in fact, protecting a trademark interest in her name? Personal domain name disputes, particularly those in the space, implicate unique aspects of an individual’s persona in cyberspace. Nevertheless, most of the legal rules developed for ...


A Winning Solution For Youtube And Utube? Corresponding Trademarks And Domain Name Sharing, Jacqueline D. Lipton Jan 2008

A Winning Solution For Youtube And Utube? Corresponding Trademarks And Domain Name Sharing, Jacqueline D. Lipton

Articles

In June of 2007, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio ruled on a motion to dismiss various claims against the Youtube video-sharing service. The claimant was Universal Tube and Rollform Equipment Corp ("Universal"), a manufacturer of pipes and tubing products. Since 1996, Universal has used the domain name utube.com - phonetically the same as Youtube's domain name, youtube.com. Youtube.com was registered in 2005 and gained almost-immediate popularity as a video-sharing website. As a result, Universal experienced excessive web traffic by Internet users looking for youtube.com and mistakenly typing utube.com into ...


Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline Lipton Mar 2007

Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline Lipton

Jacqueline D Lipton

In the lead-up to the next presidential election, it will be important for candidates both to maintain an online presence and to exercise control over bad faith uses of domain names and web content related to their campaigns. What are the legal implications for the domain name system? Although, for example, Senator Hillary Clinton now owns ‘hillaryclinton.com’, the more generic ‘hillary.com’ is registered to a software firm, Hillary Software, Inc. What about ‘hillary2008.com’? It is registered to someone outside the Clinton campaign and is not currently in active use. This article examines the large gaps and inconsistencies ...


Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline Lipton Mar 2007

Who Owns "Hillary.Com"? Political Speech And The First Amendment In Cyberspace, Jacqueline Lipton

Jacqueline D Lipton

In the lead-up to the next presidential election, it will be important for candidates both to maintain an online presence and to exercise control over bad faith uses of domain names and web content related to their campaigns. What are the legal implications for the domain name system? Although, for example, Senator Hillary Clinton now owns ‘hillaryclinton.com’, the more generic ‘hillary.com’ is registered to a software firm, Hillary Software, Inc. What about ‘hillary2008.com’? It is registered to someone outside the Clinton campaign and is not currently in active use. This article examines the large gaps and inconsistencies ...


The Constitutional Failing Of The Anticybersquatting Act, Ned Snow Jan 2005

The Constitutional Failing Of The Anticybersquatting Act, Ned Snow

Faculty Publications

Eminent domain and thought control are occurring in cyberspace. Through the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA), the government transfers domain names from domain-name owners to private parties based on the owners' bad-faith intent. The owners receive no just compensation. The private parties who are recipients of the domain names are trademark holders whose trademarks correspond with the domain names. Often the trademark holders have no property rights in those domain names: trademark law only allows mark holders to exclude others from making commercial use of their marks; it does not allow mark holders to reserve the marks for their own ...


A Barcelona.Com Analysis: Toward A Better Model For Adjudication Of International Domain Name Disputes, Zohar Efroni Dec 2003

A Barcelona.Com Analysis: Toward A Better Model For Adjudication Of International Domain Name Disputes, Zohar Efroni

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Virtual Reality: Can We Ride Trademark Law To Surf Cyberspace, David Yan Mar 2000

Virtual Reality: Can We Ride Trademark Law To Surf Cyberspace, David Yan

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Problems Arising Out Of The Use Of "Www.Trademark.Com": The Application Of Principles Of Trademark Law To Internet Domain Name Disputes, Michael B. Landau Feb 1997

Problems Arising Out Of The Use Of "Www.Trademark.Com": The Application Of Principles Of Trademark Law To Internet Domain Name Disputes, Michael B. Landau

Georgia State University Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Internet: Is It Broadcasting?, Jonathan I. Ezor, Peter Brown, Peggy Miles Jan 1997

The Internet: Is It Broadcasting?, Jonathan I. Ezor, Peter Brown, Peggy Miles

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Name Is Not Always The Same, Neal J. Friedman, Kevin Siebert Jan 1997

The Name Is Not Always The Same, Neal J. Friedman, Kevin Siebert

Seattle University Law Review

This Article explores the present Internet addressing system, the history of trademark disputes on the Internet, and proposals for resolving these disputes. Part I provides a brief history of the Internet, discusses its addressing system, and explains the use of domain names as identifiers for companies on the Internet. Part II introduces the current system for registering Internet domain names and the problems associated with its structure. Part III gives a brief background of trademark law and tracks the evolution of disputes that have arisen as a result of the intersection of the Internet and trademark law. Finally, Part IV ...