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Full-Text Articles in Law

Clearing The Smoke-Filled Room: Women Jurors And The Disruption Of An Old-Boys’ Network In Nineteenth- Century America, Cristina M. Rodríguez Jan 1999

Clearing The Smoke-Filled Room: Women Jurors And The Disruption Of An Old-Boys’ Network In Nineteenth- Century America, Cristina M. Rodríguez

Faculty Scholarship Series

In May of 1884, Massachusetts lawyer Lelia Robinson arrived in
Seattle, Washington Territory, at the end of a transcontinental journey with
the " woman question" foremost in her mind. The territorial legislature had
just passed a women's suffrage act, and Robinson had been drawn
westward by the possibility of witnessing women serve on grand and petit
juries. She arrived skeptical, believing that the scope of women's political
rights had been extended too far. " [W]hatever might be the policy and the
desirability of women's voting," she wrote, "it was carrying the matter a
little too far to force ...


Book Review: The Alien And The Asiatic In American Law, Felix S. Cohen Jan 1947

Book Review: The Alien And The Asiatic In American Law, Felix S. Cohen

Faculty Scholarship Series

This treatise on the two chief outcasts of our constitutional system, the
alien and the Asiatic, is a timely probing of the depth of our American democracy.
Its list of legal atrocities constitutionally committed upon Americans or
would-be Americans who did not have the foresight to be born in the proper
places has all the macabre fascination of old ethnology books which recount
the horrors found by missionaries among benighted peoples lacking properly
supported agencies of civilization and true religion.
Today, more than ever, such a study has meaning even for native-born
Americans of whitest ancestry. For none of us ...


Foreign Bondholders Protective Organizations, Edwin Borchard Jan 1933

Foreign Bondholders Protective Organizations, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The unfortunate experience in recent years of the American holders of defaulted foreign bonds led to the passage by Congress on May 27, 1933, of the Corporation of Foreign Bondholders Act, as Title II of the Federal Securities Act. It was designed to furnish a medium through which American bondholders could act jointly in the adjustment of their claims against defaulting governments or other foreign entities. The holders of the defaulted bonds of a foreign state occupy a peculiar position. They cannot sue in the bondholders' state, nor, even where foreign governments permit themselves to be sued, have they any ...