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Full-Text Articles in Law

“Smart” Lawyering: Integrating Technology Competence Into The Legal Practice Curriculum, Dyane L. O'Leary May 2021

“Smart” Lawyering: Integrating Technology Competence Into The Legal Practice Curriculum, Dyane L. O'Leary

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

Technology has changed modern law practice. Ethics rules obligate lawyers to understand whether, when, and how to use it to deliver services. But most law schools do not incorporate the so-called “Duty of Technology Competence” into the required curriculum. Despite broad calls for legal education to make students more practice-ready, there is no clear path forward for how to weave this valuable professional skill into coursework for all students. This Article supplies one.

The legal practice course should pair technology competence with traditional legal writing and research work. Lawyers do not draft memos or perform legal research or manage caseloads ...


Smart Cities And Sustainability: A New Challenge To Accountability?, Iria Giuffrida Apr 2021

Smart Cities And Sustainability: A New Challenge To Accountability?, Iria Giuffrida

William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review

From 1800 to today, the global population has shifted from only three percent living in an urban environment to well over fifty percent in 2020. As a result of urbanization, cities around the world struggle to manage traffic and waste, efficiently distribute utilities, and lower pollution to slow the progression of global warming. Smart city technologies have emerged as a tool to process cities’ various forms of data collected through networks of precisely placed sensors and map solutions to many of the environmental and social issues created by urbanization. For swelling metropolitan areas in the United States, China, and Europe ...


Gauging The Acceptance Of Contact Tracing Technology: An Empirical Study Of Singapore Residents’ Concerns With Sharing Their Information And Willingness To Trust, Ee-Ing Ong, Wee Ling Loo Apr 2021

Gauging The Acceptance Of Contact Tracing Technology: An Empirical Study Of Singapore Residents’ Concerns With Sharing Their Information And Willingness To Trust, Ee-Ing Ong, Wee Ling Loo

Research Collection School Of Law

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, governments began implementing various forms of contact tracing technology. Singapore’s implementation of its contact tracing technology, TraceTogether, however, was met with significant concern by its population, with regard to privacy and data security. This concern did not fit with the general perception that Singaporeans have a high level of trust in its government. We explore this disconnect, using responses to our survey (conducted pre-COVID-19) in which we asked participants about their level of concern with the government and business collecting certain categories of personal data. The results show that respondents had less concern ...


Protection Of Data In Armed Conflict, Robin Geiss, Henning Lahmann Feb 2021

Protection Of Data In Armed Conflict, Robin Geiss, Henning Lahmann

International Law Studies

This article presents a novel way to conceptualize the protection of data in situations of armed conflict. Although the question of the targeting of data through adversarial military cyber operations and its implications for the qualification of such conduct under International Humanitarian Law has been on scholars’ and states’ radar for the last few years, there remain a number of misunderstandings as to how to think about the notion of “data.” Based on a number of fictional scenarios, the article clarifies the pertinent terminology and makes some expedient distinctions between various types of data. It then analyzes how existing international ...


Hipaa-Phobia Hampers Efforts To Track And Contain Covid-19, Lee Hiromoto M.D., J.D. Jan 2021

Hipaa-Phobia Hampers Efforts To Track And Contain Covid-19, Lee Hiromoto M.D., J.D.

SLU Law Journal Online

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), enacted by the US Congress 1996, laudably protects medical privacy in healthcare settings. However, this federal law has created a culture of fear that limits current efforts to address the COVID-19 pandemic. Healthcare providers, who are covered by HIPAA, may be reluctant to disclose information about outbreak clusters for fear of violating the law. Healthcare organizations, who are also covered by the law, still rely on fax machines to avoid violating HIPAA’s data security requirements. And the scrupulous rule-following in healthcare has given independent life to a HIPAA boogeyman. Thus, officials ...


Regulating The Sixth Sense: The Growing Need For Forward-Looking Data Privacy And Device Security Policy As Illustrated By Brain-Computer Interfaces, Hannah Gallagher Jan 2021

Regulating The Sixth Sense: The Growing Need For Forward-Looking Data Privacy And Device Security Policy As Illustrated By Brain-Computer Interfaces, Hannah Gallagher

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Many of today’s consumers are skeptical of the vast amounts of information technology companies are capable of gathering. Methods of collecting such data have become more invasive over time and have the potential to become compromised or abused. Gallagher urges policymakers to consider the regulations necessary to address privacy and security risks associated with emerging biotechnology such as brain-computer interfaces (“BCI”) without disrupting innovation incentives.This Note analyzes the current state of augmentative BCI technology, the trend of increasingly invasive technology, and proposed policy solutions for governing data privacy. Since BCIs will be collecting data on consumers’ neural signals ...