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Full-Text Articles in Law

Who Are The Real Cyberbullies: Hackers Or The Ftc? The Fairness Of The Ftc’S Authority In The Data Security Context, Jaclyn K. Haughom Nov 2017

Who Are The Real Cyberbullies: Hackers Or The Ftc? The Fairness Of The Ftc’S Authority In The Data Security Context, Jaclyn K. Haughom

Catholic University Law Review

As technology continues to be an integral part of daily life, there lies an ever-increasing threat of the personally identifiable information of consumers being lost, stolen, or accessed without authorization. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is the U.S. government’s primary consumer protection agency and the country’s lead enforcer against companies subject to data breaches. Although the FTC lacks explicit statutory authority to enforce against data breaches, the Commission has successfully relied on Section 5 of the FTC Act (FTCA) to exercise its consumer protection power in the data security context. However, as the FTC continues to take ...


Disruptive Platforms, Margot Kaminski Jan 2017

Disruptive Platforms, Margot Kaminski

Articles

No abstract provided.


Health Information Equity, Craig Konnoth Jan 2017

Health Information Equity, Craig Konnoth

Articles

In the last few years, numerous Americans’ health information has been collected and used for follow-on, secondary research. This research studies correlations between medical conditions, genetic or behavioral profiles, and treatments, to customize medical care to specific individuals. Recent federal legislation and regulations make it easier to collect and use the data of the low-income, unwell, and elderly for this purpose. This would impose disproportionate security and autonomy burdens on these individuals. Those who are well-off and pay out of pocket could effectively exempt their data from the publicly available information pot. This presents a problem which modern research ethics ...


Standing After Snowden: Lessons On Privacy Harm From National Security Surveillance Litigation, Margot E. Kaminski Jan 2017

Standing After Snowden: Lessons On Privacy Harm From National Security Surveillance Litigation, Margot E. Kaminski

Articles

Article III standing is difficult to achieve in the context of data security and data privacy claims. Injury in fact must be "concrete," "particularized," and "actual or imminent"--all characteristics that are challenging to meet with information harms. This Article suggests looking to an unusual source for clarification on privacy and standing: recent national security surveillance litigation. There we can find significant discussions of what rises to the level of Article III injury in fact. The answers may be surprising: the interception of sensitive information; the seizure of less sensitive information and housing of it in a database for analysis ...


Cybersecurity Stovepiping, David Thaw Jan 2017

Cybersecurity Stovepiping, David Thaw

Articles

Most readers of this Article probably have encountered – and been frustrated by – password complexity requirements. Such requirements have become a mainstream part of contemporary culture: "the more complex your password is, the more secure you are, right?" So the cybersecurity experts tell us… and policymakers have accepted this "expertise" and even adopted such requirements into law and regulation.

This Article asks two questions. First, do complex passwords actually achieve the goals many experts claim? Does using the password "Tr0ub4dor&3" or the passphrase "correcthorsebatterystaple" actually protect your account? Second, if not, then why did such requirements become so widespread?

Through ...