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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Believer And The Powers That Are, Elizabeth Ferguson May 1988

The Believer And The Powers That Are, Elizabeth Ferguson

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Believer and the Powers That Are by John T. Noonan, Jr.


The Shadow Of Natural Rights, Or A Guide From The Perplexed, Hadley Arkes May 1988

The Shadow Of Natural Rights, Or A Guide From The Perplexed, Hadley Arkes

Michigan Law Review

A Review of American Constitutional Interpretation by Walter Murphy, James Fleming and William Harris, II


Toleration And The Constitution, Judith L. Hudson May 1987

Toleration And The Constitution, Judith L. Hudson

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Toleration and the Constitution by David A.J. Richards


The Rise Of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation To Judge-Made Law, Ward A. Greenberg May 1987

The Rise Of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation To Judge-Made Law, Ward A. Greenberg

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Rise of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation to Judge-Made Law by Christopher Wolfe


The Rise And Fall Of The "Doctrine" Of Separation Of Powers, Philip B. Kurland Dec 1986

The Rise And Fall Of The "Doctrine" Of Separation Of Powers, Philip B. Kurland

Michigan Law Review

As the Constitution of the United States nears its two hundredth anniversary, there is a frenzy of celebration. However awesome the accomplishment, I submit that it is no slander to recognize that the 1787 document was born of prudent compromise rather than principle, that it derived more from experience than from doctrine, and that it was received with an ambivalence in no small part attributable to its ambiguities. Indeed, its most stalwart supporters doubted its capacity for a long life. It should not be surprising, then, that even today there is disagreement over whether the Constitution of 1787 is now …


The Constitution As Mirror: Tribe's Constitutional Choices, Richard A. Posner Apr 1986

The Constitution As Mirror: Tribe's Constitutional Choices, Richard A. Posner

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Constitutional Choices by Laurence H. Tribe


Hyperspace, Girardeau A. Spann Apr 1986

Hyperspace, Girardeau A. Spann

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Supreme Court and Constitutional Democracy by John Agresto


Liberalism And American Constitutional Law, Eric Brunstad Apr 1986

Liberalism And American Constitutional Law, Eric Brunstad

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Liberalism and American Constitutional Law by Rogers M. Smith


On What The Constitution Means, Michigan Law Review Feb 1985

On What The Constitution Means, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Review of On What the Constitution Means by Sotirios A. Barber


A Republic, If You Can Keep It, Daniel N. Hoffman Feb 1984

A Republic, If You Can Keep It, Daniel N. Hoffman

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Undeclared War: Twilight Zone of Constitutional Power by Edward Keynes and The War-Making Powers of the President: Constitutional and International Law Aspects by Ann Van Wynen Thomas and A.J. Thomas, Jr.


Handgun Prohibition And The Original Meaning Of The Second Amendment, Don B. Kates Jr. Nov 1983

Handgun Prohibition And The Original Meaning Of The Second Amendment, Don B. Kates Jr.

Michigan Law Review

One of the purposes of this Article will be to sketch out at least some of the very substantial limitations on the right of individuals to keep and bear arms suggested by the historical evidence. First, however, the controversy between the individual right and the exclusively state's right views must be resolved. The evidence to be examined must include: the literal language of the second amendment; the history of its proposal and ratification; the philosophical and historical background that gave rise to the Founders' belief in "the necessity of an armed populace to effect popular sovereignty"; and the contemporary understanding …


Double Jeopardy And Federal Prosecution After State Jury Acquittal, Michigan Law Review Apr 1982

Double Jeopardy And Federal Prosecution After State Jury Acquittal, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note argues that the rationale of the Supreme Court's post-conviction cases cannot be extended to cases involving jury acquittal and that federal reprosecution after state jury acquittal violates the double jeopardy clause. One can give meaning to the clause, Part Iexplains, only by reference to its underlying constitutional values.Part II suggests that these values, while possibly compatible with federal prosecution after a state conviction, cannot countenance reprosecution after a jury acquittal. Part III proposes that courts determine whether such reprosecution is appropriate by applying the Blockhurger same offense standard: Two offenses are the same unless each requires proof of …


A Critique Of John Hart Ely's Quest For The Ultimate Constitutional Interpretivism Of Representative Democracy, James E. Fleming Mar 1982

A Critique Of John Hart Ely's Quest For The Ultimate Constitutional Interpretivism Of Representative Democracy, James E. Fleming

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Democracy and Distrust: A Theory of Judicial Review by John Hart Ely


The Straight And Narrow Path, Gerald T. Dunne Mar 1982

The Straight And Narrow Path, Gerald T. Dunne

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Democracy and Distrust: A Theory of Judicial Review by John Hart Ely


Constitutional Adjudication: Deciding When To Decide, Carl Mcgowan Mar 1981

Constitutional Adjudication: Deciding When To Decide, Carl Mcgowan

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Judicial Review And The National Political Process: A Functional Reconsideration of the Role of the Supreme Court by Jesse H. Choper


The Eighteenth-Century Background Of John Marshall's Constitutional Jurisprudence, William E. Nelson May 1978

The Eighteenth-Century Background Of John Marshall's Constitutional Jurisprudence, William E. Nelson

Michigan Law Review

This analysis of Marshall's constitutional jurisprudence avoids the pitfalls of previous theories. It does not see the Federalist political program as the source of Marshall's constitutional doctrines and thus does not need to explain how Marshall qualified his political principles or how he convinced non-Federalist judges to accept them. Instead, this essay argues that legal, not political, principles underlay Marshall's jurisprudence, but it attempts to understand those principles in a manner consistent with the unavoidable twentieth-century assumption that law is a body of flexible rules responsive to social reality rather than a series of immutable, unambiguous doctrines derived from a …


Equal Protection: A Closer Look At Closer Scrutiny, Michigan Law Review Apr 1978

Equal Protection: A Closer Look At Closer Scrutiny, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note proposes to restore means-end analysis to legal respectability through a comprehensive integrated approach to purpose, misfit, and balancing. The search for a rational basis is meaningless if there are no constraints on the kind of purpose which may justify a classification. Therefore, this Note initially explores ways in which a court can more rigorously scrutinize statutory purpose. The next significant question is how a court should evaluate the degree of coincidence between the class picked out by the law and the class which would be picked out if the law were to achieve its goals. Such "misfit" analysis …


Congressional Power Under The Appointments Clause After Buckley V. Valeo, Michigan Law Review Jan 1977

Congressional Power Under The Appointments Clause After Buckley V. Valeo, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note examines the constitutional power of Congress to control the selection of government officers. It first discusses the article II grant itself and concludes that the Court in Buckley correctly interpreted that provision to prohibit direct appointment by Congress of officers who are found to possess "significant authority." The Note then explores possible means not explicitly foreclosed in Buckley by which Congress might influence such appointments and argues that these alternatives are restricted by the same constitutional principles that prohibit direct congressional appointments.


Ex Post Facto Limitations On Legislative Power, Michigan Law Review Aug 1975

Ex Post Facto Limitations On Legislative Power, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note explores the rationale underlying the prohibition of ex post facto laws and formulates an analytic framework for a more principled application .of the prohibition. This analytic framework is then used, first, to critique the present strict application of the prohibition to changes in criminal "punishments" and determine whether the prohibition should be applied to sanctions imposed outside the criminal context, and, second, to determine the degree to which the prohibition should be applied to procedural changes.


Immunity Under The Speech Or Debate Clause For Republican And From Questioning About Sources, Michigan Law Review May 1973

Immunity Under The Speech Or Debate Clause For Republican And From Questioning About Sources, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Gravel v. United States, which arose out of Senator Mike Gravel's attempt to publicize the Pentagon Papers, concerned the scope of the immunity conferred upon a legislator and his aide under article I, section 6, of the United States Constitution. This provision, commonly called the "speech or debate clause," provides that "for any Speech or Debate in either House, [United States Senators or Representatives] shall not be questioned in any other Place." Gravel is one of the few Supreme Court interpretations of this clause.


Judicial Supremacy Re-Examined: A Proposed Alternative, G. Sidney Buchanan Jun 1972

Judicial Supremacy Re-Examined: A Proposed Alternative, G. Sidney Buchanan

Michigan Law Review

A citizen critic recently expressed to me his bitter opposition to the Warren Court's decisions on school prayer and school desegregation. If this critic were elected governor of a state or placed in some other position of governmental authority, he would almost certainly use his power to block public school desegregation and to encourage prayer reading in the public schools. Conceding that our critic would be acting controversially in so using his power, would he be acting unconstitutionally? This is the question which this Article will attempt to answer. More generally, this Article will consider the extent to which a …


The Presidential Veto Power: A Shallow Pocket, Michigan Law Review Nov 1971

The Presidential Veto Power: A Shallow Pocket, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Problems created by the uncertain scope of the President's pocket-veto power do not often arise, but neither are they a matter of purely academic interest. Indeed, two Senators who have questioned President Nixon's use of the pocket-veto power base their challenge on the ambiguous language of the pocket-veto provision. They argue that the pocket-veto provision was intended to apply only in circumstances involving a final adjournment at the end of a term or a session of Congress and was not intended to apply to brief adjournments-such as the 1970 Christmas recess-occurring within a session of Congress. Senator Kennedy contends that …


Juvenile Courts--Juveniles In Delinquency Proceedings Are Not Constitutionally Entitled To The Right Of Trial By Jury--Mckeiver V. Pennsylvania, Michigan Law Review Nov 1971

Juvenile Courts--Juveniles In Delinquency Proceedings Are Not Constitutionally Entitled To The Right Of Trial By Jury--Mckeiver V. Pennsylvania, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

At a hearing in the juvenile court of Philadelphia in October 1968, Joseph McKeiver was declared a "delinquent child" and placed on probation by a juvenile court judge who determined that McKeiver had violated a Pennsylvania law. The juvenile court petition charged McKeiver, then sixteen years old, with robbery, larceny, and receiving stolen goods as the result of an incident in which McKeiver and twenty or thirty other youths took twenty-five cents from three teenagers. Despite the fact that the evidence against McKeiver consisted primarily of the weak and inconsistent testimony of two of the victims, the juvenile court judge, …


Conscription And The Constitution: The Original Understanding, Leon Friedman Jun 1969

Conscription And The Constitution: The Original Understanding, Leon Friedman

Michigan Law Review

The general words of the Constitution-famous phrases such as "due process," "freedom of speech," "interstate commerce," and "raise and support armies"-are not self-evident concepts. As Justice Frankfurter said, "The language of the [Constitution] is to be read not as barren words found in a dictionary but as symbols of historic experience illumined by the presuppositions of those who employed them. Not what words did Madison and Hamilton use, but what was it in their minds which they conveyed?" While the framers obviously could not have foreseen the discovery of electromagnetic radio waves or atomic energy, and had no "intent" concerning …


The Supreme Court And The Rule Of Law, Paul G. Kauper Feb 1961

The Supreme Court And The Rule Of Law, Paul G. Kauper

Michigan Law Review

I should like to approach this afternoon's subject along two lines. On the one hand, I propose to develop the subject in terms of the Supreme Court's contribution to our understanding of the Rule of Law, and, on the other hand, I propose to look at the Supreme Court as a governmental institution subject to the Rule of Law. In short, I propose to discuss the Supreme Court both as an instrumentality for the development of the American concept of the Rule of Law and as an institution governed by the Rule of Law. Needless to say, these two approaches …


Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell Feb 1922

Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell

Michigan Law Review

While the Constitution does not in terms forbid the United States, as it forbids the states, to pass any law impairing the obligation of contracts, the principle has become established that contracts made by the United States may create rights of which individuals may not be divested. This principle is attached to the Fifth Amendment's prohibition against depriving any person of property without due process of law. In applying this principle, United States v. Northern Pacific Ry. Co.2 held that a grant of land to a railroad to induce its construction is a contract, and that provisions for substituting indemnity …


Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell Jan 1922

Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell

Michigan Law Review

The difficulty of classifying cases on the police power has not evaporated since the review of decisions for the preceding year. The headings there suggested are used here. Classification on the basis of the objects of the legislation appears too precarious to be attempted with any confidence. It seems safer to work along the line of the subject matters with which the legislation deals. Certain topics are species of a wider genus, and thus the same case may be put in two or more groups. Readers who are dissatisfied with the classification adopted may be assured of the sympathy of …


Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell Dec 1921

Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell

Michigan Law Review

In a proceeding brought by the United States to restrain the construction of a dam in a stream alleged to be a "navigable river, or other navigable water of the United States," Economy Light & Power Co. v. United States2 held that "a river having actual navigable capacity in its natural state and capable of carrying commerce among the states is within the power of Congress to preserve for future transportation, even though it be not at present used for such commerce, and be incapable of such use according to present methods, either by reason of changed conditions or because …


Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell Nov 1921

Supreme Court's Construction Of The Federal Constitution In 1920-1921, Thomas Reed Powell

Michigan Law Review

This review of Supreme Court decisions on constitutional law during the October Term of 1920 follows the plan of its predecessors.' Its aim is the modest one of exposing the precise points decided and the precise or unprecise reasons given in support of the results reached. A valiant effort is made to refrain from criticism or from adding anything to the contributions of the judges. In the footnotes are assembled references to discussions of the cases reviewed in the text and of other issues of constitutional law considered in recognized law journals from October, 1920, to October, 1921. No effort …