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Constitutional Law

2001

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Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 43

Full-Text Articles in Law

Editorial, Succession Question Requires Amendment, Randy Lee Dec 2001

Editorial, Succession Question Requires Amendment, Randy Lee

Randy Lee

No abstract provided.


Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman Dec 2001

Baker V. State And The Promise Of The New Judicial Federalism, Charles H. Baron, Lawrence Friedman

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In Baker v. State, the Supreme Court of Vermont ruled that the state constitution’s Common Benefits Clause prohibits the exclusion of same-sex couples from the benefits and protections of marriage. Baker has been praised by constitutional scholars as a prototypical example of the New Judicial Federalism. The authors agree, asserting that the decision sets a standard for constitutional discourse by dint of the manner in which each of the opinions connects and responds to the others, pulls together arguments from other state and federal constitutional authorities, and provides a clear basis for subsequent development of constitutional principle. This Article ...


Closet Case: Boy Scouts Of America V. Dale And The Reinforcement Of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, And Transgender Invisibility, Darren Hutchinson Oct 2001

Closet Case: Boy Scouts Of America V. Dale And The Reinforcement Of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, And Transgender Invisibility, Darren Hutchinson

Darren L Hutchinson

This Article argues that the Supreme Court's decision in Boy Scouts of America v. Dale misapplies and ignores controlling First Amendment precedent and incorrectly defines "sexual identity" as a clinical or biological imposition that exists apart from expression or speech. This article provides a doctrinal alternative to Dale that would protect vital interests in both equality and liberty and that would not condition, as does Dale, sexual "equality" upon the silencing of gay lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals.


Purveyance And Power Or Over-Priced Free Lunch: The Intellectual Property Clause As An Ally Of The Takings Clause In The Public’S Control Of Government, Malla Pollack Oct 2001

Purveyance And Power Or Over-Priced Free Lunch: The Intellectual Property Clause As An Ally Of The Takings Clause In The Public’S Control Of Government, Malla Pollack

Malla Pollack

Government can bypass citizen control if it can use revenue not publicly scrutinized through the public taxing/spending system. One method of bypass is paying with non-monetary compensation such as (i) property, or (ii) the right to charge others for some necessary good or service, intangible property. The Takings/Just Compensation Clause of the Fifth Amendment is one authority controlling government's ability to bypass financial scrutiny. In this article, I argue that the Intellectual Property Clause also should be used to control some governmental bypass. I attempt to justify this suggestion both theoretically and historically. The historical material included ...


A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman Oct 2001

A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman

Law Faculty Publications

The Tenth Amendment is invoked whenever congressional powers threaten the independent law-making power of the several states. In that context, however, the Tenth Amendment does not tell us very much. After all, if powers are not delegated to the federal government, where else would they go but to the states? Accordingly, the Supreme Court has dismissed the Amendment as a truism.

Although the Amendment is only deployed as a rather ineffectual check on congressional authority, it clearly applies to all branches of the federal government. However, according to the theory of inherent executive authority, certain powers are unique to the ...


Bush V. Gore And Equal Protection, Martin D. Carcieri Oct 2001

Bush V. Gore And Equal Protection, Martin D. Carcieri

South Carolina Law Review

No abstract provided.


Licensing Speech: The Case Of Vanity Plates, Marybeth Herald May 2001

Licensing Speech: The Case Of Vanity Plates, Marybeth Herald

Marybeth Herald

Vanity license plates qualify as protected speech under the First Amendment, and denying plate requests because of their content contradicts traditional principles of free speech. State motor vehicle departments are almost as creative as applicants when it comes to ferreting out offensive license plate requests through the use of computer programs and linguists. Offensiveness, however, remains an elusive concept to capture and often lies in the eyes of a single viewer. When the government takes on the role of arbiter of good taste, it leads to arbitrary decision making and chaotic results.

Under traditional First Amendment doctrine, vanity license plates ...


Section 1983, The First Amendment, And Public Employee Speech: Shaping The Right To Fit The Remedy (And Vice Versa), Michael Wells Apr 2001

Section 1983, The First Amendment, And Public Employee Speech: Shaping The Right To Fit The Remedy (And Vice Versa), Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

This Article is not about theories of free speech and how they bear on the public employment context, nor does it contribute to the academic debate over what the aims of public employee speech law ought to be. I take the Court at its word when it says that its aim is to give substantial weight to both the value of speech and the government's interest as an employer. Unlike Massaro and Ingber, I take it as a given that the government may insist on hierarchy and obedience to authority in the workplace. Unlike Rosenthal, I begin from the ...


Corrective Justice And Constitutional Torts, Bernard P. Dauenhauer, Michael L. Wells Apr 2001

Corrective Justice And Constitutional Torts, Bernard P. Dauenhauer, Michael L. Wells

Scholarly Works

Tort liability in the private realm may be understood as "an instrument aimed...at deterrence...[and] a way of achieving corrective justice between the parties." Following the common law model, the Supreme Court has borrowed this normative framework for constitutional torts, ruling that the aims of liability for damages are to vindicate constitutional rights and to deter constitutional violations. A recent article by Daryl Levinson takes issue with this approach. Levinson argues that the superficial similarities between public torts and private torts conceal real differences, to which neither the Court nor scholars have paid adequate attention. The main point of ...


Foreword: Symposium Re-Examining First Principles: Deterrence And Corrective Justice In Constitutional Torts, Thomas A. Eaton Apr 2001

Foreword: Symposium Re-Examining First Principles: Deterrence And Corrective Justice In Constitutional Torts, Thomas A. Eaton

Scholarly Works

This Symposium provides a forum for a careful and thoughtful consideration of whether constitutional tort law can deter wrongdoing and is consistent with principles of corrective justice.


The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod Feb 2001

The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod Jan 2001

The Gfp (Green) Bunny: Reflections On The Intersection Of Art, Science And The First Amendment, Sheldon Nahmod

Sheldon Nahmod

No abstract provided.


Rights Of Inequality: Rawlsian Justice, Equal Opportunity, And The Status Of The Family, Justin Schwartz Jan 2001

Rights Of Inequality: Rawlsian Justice, Equal Opportunity, And The Status Of The Family, Justin Schwartz

Justin Schwartz

Is the family subject to principles of justice? In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls includes the (monogamous) family along with the market and the government as among the "basic institutions of society" to which principles of justice apply. Justice, he famously insists, is primary in politics as truth is in science: the only excuse for tolerating injustice is that no lesser injustice is possible. The point of the present paper is that Rawls doesn't actually mean this. When it comes to the family, and in particular its impact on fair equal opportunity (the first part of the the ...


A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman Jan 2001

A Truism That Isn't True? The Tenth Amendment And Executive War Power, D. A. Jeremy Telman

D. A. Jeremy Telman

The Tenth Amendment is invoked whenever congressional powers threaten the independent law-making power of the several states. In that context, however, the Tenth Amendment does not tell us very much. After all, if powers are not delegated to the federal government, where else would they go but to the states? Accordingly, the Supreme Court has dismissed the Amendment as a truism.

Although the Amendment is only deployed as a rather ineffectual check on congressional authority, it clearly applies to all branches of the federal government. However, according to the theory of inherent executive authority, certain powers are unique to the ...


In The Wake Of Lee V. Weisman: The Future Of School Graduation Prayer Is Uncertain At Best, Stephen Durden Jan 2001

In The Wake Of Lee V. Weisman: The Future Of School Graduation Prayer Is Uncertain At Best, Stephen Durden

Stephen Durden

No abstract provided.


Nude Entertainment Zoning, Stephen Durden Jan 2001

Nude Entertainment Zoning, Stephen Durden

Stephen Durden

Local government regulation, as opposed to prohibition, of nude entertainment began in earnest in the 1970's. These regulations generally fell into four categories: (1) zoning; (2) prohibiting nude entertainment in conjunction with the service of alcohol; (3) licensing; and (4) regulating conduct, e.g., hours of operation, distance from customers, prohibition of private booths. The proliferation of these many and varied approaches began soon after the Supreme Court in California v. LaRue held that nude dancing is, or at least might be, protected by the First Amendment. Prior to LaRue, states regularly prohibited nude entertainment via general prohibitions on ...


James Madison And The Constitution's “Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson Jan 2001

James Madison And The Constitution's “Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

This article traces the progress of James Madison's thought on the Constitution's "convention for proposing amendments as a way for states to assert themselves against the federal government. Madison saw the convention as an important part of the Constitution, and a constitutional alternative to nullification.


Subjective States Of Mind And Custodial Arrest: Race Based Policing, Christopher C. Cooper Jan 2001

Subjective States Of Mind And Custodial Arrest: Race Based Policing, Christopher C. Cooper

Christopher C. Cooper Dr.

No abstract provided.


Florida V. J.L.-Withdrawing Permission To “Lie With Impunity”: The Demise Of “Truly Anonymous” Informants And The Resurrection Of The Aguilar/Spinelli Test For Probable Cause, Peter Erlinder Jan 2001

Florida V. J.L.-Withdrawing Permission To “Lie With Impunity”: The Demise Of “Truly Anonymous” Informants And The Resurrection Of The Aguilar/Spinelli Test For Probable Cause, Peter Erlinder

C. Peter Erlinder

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Revolutions: A New Look At Lower Appellate Review In American Constitutionalism, Robert Justin Lipkin Jan 2001

Constitutional Revolutions: A New Look At Lower Appellate Review In American Constitutionalism, Robert Justin Lipkin

Robert Justin Lipkin

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Law: State Campaign Contribution Limits: Nixon V. Shrink Missouri Government Pac: An Abridgment Of Freedom In The Name Of Democracy, Richard J. Baker Jan 2001

Constitutional Law: State Campaign Contribution Limits: Nixon V. Shrink Missouri Government Pac: An Abridgment Of Freedom In The Name Of Democracy, Richard J. Baker

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Correction Of Wrongful Convictions: A Comparative Perspective, Lissa Griffin Jan 2001

The Correction Of Wrongful Convictions: A Comparative Perspective, Lissa Griffin

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

This Article analyzes the different modes in which two facially similar adversarial systems remedy wrongful convictions. Part I briefly examines the origins of wrongful convictions in both England and the United States. Part II describes the appellate processes in the two countries for correcting wrongful convictions. Part III addresses the processes for correcting wrongful convictions after the appellate processes have been completed. Part IV critiques the English process and examines whether aspects of that process may be carried over to the United States.


Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman Jan 2001

Lochner, Liquor, And Longshoremen: A Puzzle In Progressive Era Federalism, Barry Cushman

Journal Articles

In 1890, the Supreme Court shocked and thrilled the civilized world with the announcement that dry states could not prohibit the sale of liquor shipped in from outside the state. So long as the out-of-state goods remained in their "original packages," the Court held they retained their character as interstate commerce subject only to federal regulation. The consequences for the cause of local sobriety were, predictably, catastrophic. The proliferation in temperance territory of "original package saloons," at which one could purchase liquor free from the superintendence of local liquor authorities, was appalling to dry eyes. Members of Congress immediately proposed ...


The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman Jan 2001

The Supreme Court 2000 Term--Leading Cases, Good News Club V. Milford Central School, 121 S. Ct. 2093 (2001), Emily Gold Waldman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

After the Supreme Court held in Widmar v. Vincent that state universities could not constitutionally deny religious groups access to facilities generally available to student groups, a number of school districts authored access policies that were designed to create “limited public forums.” These policies delineated the categories of activities for which school property could be used, and indicated that religious activities were not among them. In Lamb's Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District, however, the Supreme Court struck a blow to the notion that school districts could employ the limited public forum approach to exclude religious activities ...


What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald Jan 2001

What's So Special About American Law?, William Ewald

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Federal Preemption Of State Tort Claims, Marin Roger Scordato Jan 2001

Federal Preemption Of State Tort Claims, Marin Roger Scordato

Scholarly Articles

This article explores a continuing disagreement among Justices of the United States Supreme Court regarding the proper doctrinal framework for federal preemption jurisprudence. This important difference in views became apparent in the four federal preemption cases that the Supreme Court decided during its 1999-2000 term. The article describes this critical disagreement among the Justices, places it in the larger context of preemption doctrine, and then carefully analyzes a number of possible resolutions.

Federal preemption is an area of enormous practical and theoretical importance. It is a subject that has earned a regular place on the Supreme Court's docket for ...


Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove Jan 2001

Takings Clause, Tara Leigh Grove

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Technologies Of Protest: Insurgent Social Movements And The First Amendment In The Era Of The Internet, Seth F. Kreimer Jan 2001

Technologies Of Protest: Insurgent Social Movements And The First Amendment In The Era Of The Internet, Seth F. Kreimer

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


United States Supreme Court: 2001 Term, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 2001

United States Supreme Court: 2001 Term, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The American Prosecutor: Independence, Power, And The Threat Of Tyranny, Angela J. Davis Jan 2001

The American Prosecutor: Independence, Power, And The Threat Of Tyranny, Angela J. Davis

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This Article compares the power, practices, and policies of the Independent Counsel with those of ordinary state and federal prosecutors and suggests that the purported distinctions turn out to be illusory. Part I charts the principal structural characteristics of the Independent Counsel and regular prosecutors, with particular focus on prosecutorial discretion and the charging power. This section notes the public outrage over former Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr and argues that the American prosecutor deserves similar scrutiny. Using illustrations from the author’s former experience as a public defender, this Part explains how regular prosecutors engage in the same acts of ...